Eugene Cho

calling on dreamers, visionaries, and investors

Eugene & Minhee Cho, co-founders of One Day's Wages

We recently unveiled our vision for One Day’s Wages – a movement to fight extreme global poverty. We’re still working hard to get the beta version of the website ready by late June/early July and a full launch by September but we still need your help.  This is my invitation for the early Dreamers, Visionaries, & Investors to help launch One Day’s Wages.

Raising funds is not an easy to do especially in light of two things: 1) I hear there’s a global financial recession going on, and 2) It’s not easy investing in something you’re really not sure if it’s going to do what it aspires to do.

And what is ODW’s aspiration?

Inspiring people around the world through human relationships & stories and technology & social media to stir a movement to fight extreme global poverty.

Would you consider being amongst our early Dreamers, Visionaries, and Investors?  Here’s the good news: We’ve already raised $50,519.63 for the Administration Fund and our goal is to raise $150,000.  We’re also receiving donations for the Giving Fund (100% of these funds go towards organizations, causes, and projects and we’ve raised $4,035). If you’re interested or know someone that might be interested, here’s some relevant links for your due diligence:

Additional good news: Until mid-September, people can donate to One Day’s Wages via Amazon Payments with absolutely ZERO surcharges (amazing!). You can also mail your donation.

Yesterday, Seattle Business Journal published this article about One Day’s Wages.  Help us spread the word by tweeting or posting the article on Facebook, or sending our Vision Letter to some of your family & friends that might resonate with ODW’s vision.

Thank for dreaming with us…

[link to article]
A Seattle pastor and blogger is launching a grass-roots, global movement to fight extreme poverty by asking supporters to donate something he says won’t break the budgets: one day’s worth of wages.

The group, One Day’s Wages, was granted status as a nonprofit in May and will unveil a website to accept donations this month. Founded by Eugene Cho and his wife, Min Hee Cho, One Day’s Wages is using social networking tools such as Facebook and Twitter to seek funds. The nonprofit’s mission is not associated with any faith, the Chos said.

The concept is simple: Donate a single workday’s worth of wages — equal to $192 for an income of $50,000 a year — and have donors renew the pledge each year on their birthday.

“My wife and I want to do our part to impact the larger world,” said Eugene Cho, a blogger and Christian pastor at Quest Church in Seattle.

The nonprofit’s Facebook group, called Fight Global Poverty, lists an astounding 803,000 members. The Chos pledged to give $1 for every member of the Facebook group, up to $100,000, and Eugene Cho asked his 2,000 friends on Facebook to consider joining the group. From there word spread rapidly, he said.

“It is pretty stunning to us,” Eugene Cho said of the interest the concept has received.

One Day’s Wages has begun receiving donations but will not make grants until September after screening groups to be eligible to receive the donations, Cho said.

Cho said the idea came to him and his wife three years ago after one of their three children asked about poor children in a television commercial. The question resonated, so Cho and his wife pledged one year of their household income — about $68,000 — to fight poverty. From that, One Day’s Wages was born and the Chos increased their total pledge to $100,000, some of which might go to cover administrative costs for One Day’s Wages.

The group is trying to raise $150,000 to cover the first two years’ administrative costs for the new nonprofit, Cho said. Still, as the recession worsened, the pledge has put the family in a financial bind and they have sold some assets to cover basic needs, Cho said. “It has been a very humbling, painful time as a family.”

The interest on Facebook is providing inspiration, Cho said. “A big part of our vision is this is what we mean by a movement,” he said. “We really are trying to inspire people to be more generous and compassionate.”

Cho said donations will be passed through to established organizations that support clean water, education, health and other strategies for fighting poverty.

“Our desire is not to reinvent the wheel,” Cho said.

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5 Responses

  1. Hey Eugene,

    I’ve been following you on Twitter…I can’t make a financial contribution at this time, but if there is any other way I can support ODW please let me know (photography? video/film?). My website is http://www.blueskyhill.com.

  2. Matt Busby says:

    Can’t wait to spread the word! Your faithfulness through this process is what is so inspiring!

  3. randplaty says:

    I’ve been reading about your organization and watched the videos and read the letter and I must confess to you that I still don’t quite understand the purpose of your organization. It seems like you are encouraging and collecting funds to fight global poverty and in turn are then giving the funds to other organizations.

    I don’t mean to be disrespectful or anything but isn’t your organization a type of “middleman?” Why can you publish a list of your recommended NGOs and we can donate directly to the NGOs? That way we save the $150000 in operational costs for your organization and that money can be used directly in the war against extreme poverty. I’m probably just missing something here, but what added value does your organization contribute?

  4. me says:

    @randplaty: if it’s not clear, then we haven’t done a good job communicating our vision. hopefully, it’ll become clearer when we share our website.

    but i would encourage you to donate directly to NGOs you believe in. that would be cool.

  5. Pat says:

    Hmmm.

    Makes sense to me, Eugene. You’ve made everything transparent and that’s what I really appreciate. You’re asking for some investment to build a network to inspire thousands to join the cause. And if I read your letter correctly, you’ve already stated that 100% of all public donations are going to organizations that people choose via One Day’s Wages.

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One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

People often ask, "How does one stand all that rain in Seattle?" Actually, it doesn't rain that much. I like the rain. Keeps everything "evergreen" and clean. Keeps our air fresh. What's challenging is the gray weather. Give me a few more sunny days. 99 more days to be specific. 
Regardless, still love this city. Checking out Canada in case I need to move up North after the presidential election. Just saying, eh.

Downtown Toronto. Fascinating architecture. Amazed by the diversity of this city. We desperately want our children to not just be captivated by the beauty of creation...but more importantly, to the actual Creator of all that is good and beautiful.

Actually, we want and need this truth for our souls, too. What a privilege. This isn't possible without all those who give, pray, and support the work of @onedayswages. This week, I signed and mailed grants to three partner organizations totaling over $170,000. These grants will empower people by supporting maternal health care, refugee relief efforts, access to clean water, provide education, etc.

Sometimes, the brokenness of the world feel so overwhelming but let's keep running the race with endurance. Let's keep pursuing justice, mercy, and humility. Let's be faithful and may we be spurred on to keep working for God's Kingdom...on earth as it is in heaven.

Again, thank you so much for your support for @onedayswages! My wife, Minhee, and I stand on the shoulders of praying mothers. I'd like to take a moment to honor my mother-in-law. It's hard to put words together to embody her life but she is a very special, anointed person. I'm so blessed to have her as a mother in my life.

She was a devoted wife until she lost her husband to cancer, mother to three daughters, and later became a pastor. She became a follower of Christ as an adult and as such, led her her family to Christ. In her late 50s, she obeyed God's calling to go to seminary and be a leader in the church. She graduated #1 in her class and reminded us that it's never too late to follow a new dream or calling.

As she'll soon celebrate her 80th birthday, I'm especially grateful for the ways that she poured into and prayed over Minhee and her other children.  Even though she's officially retired, I'm inspired that the concept of retirement is not in her vocabulary.  She continues to serve the local church, evangelize and bear witness to Christ, and goes to the early morning prayer meeting at 5am everyday to pray for our family, our church, and for others. 
Jangmonim, we love and honor you. 어머니, 사랑합니다.

Someday, I hope that when my kids speak of Minhee and I...above all, they would say with integrity that their parents prayed for them and kept pointing them to Christ. On this Mother's Day, I want to take a few words to honor mother.

There’s a moment from a few years ago that will stick with me until the day I die. It’s regarding Sung Wha, my mother.

Minhee and I were at a point of transition, between working at an ethnic Korean church in the northern suburbs of Seattle called Lynnwood and launching Quest in urban Seattle. As I shared earlier, I was in desperate need of a job. I had a mortgage to pay. A pregnant wife. A kid at home. 
Then, praise God, after months without work, I finally landed a job.

My mom was in between jobs at this point in her life. She was in her late fifties, but she had such bad knees and degenerative hips that it was, and is, difficult for her to walk. My mom is like a human barometer—when a storm is coming and when it rains, her hips throb. Although my parents lived in San Francisco, she was visiting us in Seattle to encourage us in this difficult season.

As I prepared to go to work one early morning, I walked downstairs to put on my jacket and shoes, and forgot that my mother woke up early every morning to pray. In fact, she had been praying for months that I would find a job. “Eugene, where are you going?” she said when she saw me.

I hadn’t told my mother the news that I had just recently been hired for the janitorial gig at Barnes and Noble. I chose not to because I thought she and my father would be devastated. I didn’t want them to think that after laboring, sacrificing, and doing so much for us over all those years that their son had failed them.

But I couldn’t lie to her, so eventually I told my mom that I got a job and was going to work. “Great! What job? What are you doing?” “Um, I’m working at Barnes and Noble as their custodian,” I said finally.

Without asking another question, my mother got up from the dining table where she had been reading her Bible and praying. She slowly walked slowly toward me.

She approached me, then walked past me without saying a word, and I realized she was headed toward the closet. She opened the closet door, put on her jacket, turned around and said to me (in Korean), “Eugene, let’s go together. I will help you.” This is my mother.

my tweets

  • It's been years since Seattle Sonics "became" the OKC Thunder. Still stings. Seattle deserves a team before OKC gets a title. That is all. || 2 hours ago
  • That time when nearly everyone laughed at @KlayThompson when he said he was the best shooting guard in the NBA. || 2 hours ago
  • The best part of wanting to change the world...is being humbled, learning you're not the savior of the world & being changed in the process. || 13 hours ago
  • Cheer up Toronto & Canada. Great season. Also, you have free health care, toonies and your political candidates are not as crazy as America. || 1 day ago
  • Make friendships more than transactions. There's a huge difference between "I appreciate you" and "I appreciate what you can do for me." || 1 day ago
  • There's much to ponder in this article. Much to repent. Much to grieve. "Seattle's vanishing black community." - seattletimes.com/pacific-nw-mag… || 2 days ago

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