Eugene Cho

Invest in women and girls around the world as an affirmation of dignity that has already been given to them by God.

This is one of the reasons why my wife, kids, and I started One Day’s Wages. It’s because we believe in local heroes like Diana Keesiga who was  born in Western Uganda and at a very young age decided she wanted to be an engineer. She defies the dangerous stereotypes that we have about Africans being absolutely lost and helpless without Western saviors or only looking for handouts. Diana has a love and understanding of her Ugandan people and culture that we will never fully grasp – which is why its best for us to come alongside people like Diana but we should never take their place.

In doing the work of justice, one of the most fundamental questions we must ask is this:

“Who are we trying to elevate? The people we serve or ourselves?

I dare you to watch this short video (above) about Diana and the water partnership between One Day’s Wages and The Adventure Project – that is currently being featured on Upworthy. There are many but here are four reasons why I love this partnership:

1 in 3 water wells are broken in Africa

While there are few things in development as spectacular as seeing water gush out of the ground after a well is drilled, what happens in year 2, 5, and 10 is far more important and difficult. By many reports, over one-third of all wells drilled in the last twenty years are now broken – 50,000 are currently broken in Africa alone, preventing access to clean water for millions of people. Some experts say as much as 60% of wells in the developing world aren’t working. Wells often break within a few years and in most instances, there are no trained mechanics, spare parts, or tools nearby…or the local community is not invested enough to maintain the well.

That’s why good community development must work with communities to equip people to care for their water systems, long after the “grand opening” ribbon-cutting ceremonies have faded from memory. If some organization comes in, drills wells, and doesn’t teach people the importance of clean water or teach how to care for the systems from a community level, it’s a disservice to the community.

For those that aren’t good at math, that’s 1 out of every three water wells. Like a lot. Like 33% a lot.While there’s value in creating new water solutions, it’s also smart for many reasons to “rehabilitate” and fix those broken water wells.

23 broken wells to be exact. For 23 different communities.

Jobs and People

This partnership creates 46 jobs.
Will this fix everything?
Will it change the entire world?

The answers: No and No.

How about now? No, still won’t change everything but those jobs will impact the world of those 46 people. Those jobs for local folks will create ownership that will  impact sustainability. Even more so, those water wells will help provide clean water to about 5750 people. Not a typo. Real people. And while water, in itself, won’t fix everything, it impacts so much.

5750 people.

No “Free” Water

Yes. That’s what I wrote. No “free” water.

Handouts can be debilitating in any context. We’re not speaking about abusing water privileges or preventing access but when we keep assuming that people are so poor…we can easily make false assumptions and in the process, block paths to create healthier systems and for more ownership and sustainability.

When I’ve traveled to the developing world, it’s always amazed me how many people have cellphones. Those cellphones have costs and thus, are seen as particularly valuable.

Water is valuable. Charge a small fee for usage. Very small fee. But those small usage fees add up that go to a fund that helps for repair costs because we know the inevitable will eventually all happen: All wells and water pumps will break at some point.

But they don’t have to remain broken.

Exit strategy.
Ownership.

Investing in women and girls

This isn’t about favoring women over men but a simple acknowledgement of the gross imbalance of power and opportunities in the world. It would be false and misleading to say that investing in women will dramatically impact the world without first acknowledging the “why” behind such a dramatic statement. In short, investing in women and girls will dramatic impact the local communities and world because in many parts of the world, the gifts and personhoods of girls and women are often overlooked, ignored, and forgotten. Thus…half the sky.

In short, the oldest injustice in human history is the way we treat women.

Consider this – research demonstrates that girls who complete seven years of schooling will marry four years later and have 2.2 fewer children than girls who do not complete primary school. Yet even though the economic and social returns of investing in girls are undeniable, World Bank research demonstrates that only two pennies of every dollar in international aid funding goes to support programs for girls.

In Davos last month at the World Economic Forum, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon told world leaders that girls are the key to ending global poverty. Investing in girls is now proven to be one of the most cost effective strategies to improve health, education, and economic outcomes for poor countries around the world.

Just like the girl on the train, there are 600 million girls living in poor countries who struggle to eat, attend school, and see a doctor when they need one. These girls could be our own daughters – bright, eager to learn, with dreams and hopes for the future. These girls could become doctors, entrepreneurs, and leaders of their countries. These girls could change the world.

Reality, however, is very different. Most of these girls are forced to work while their brothers attend school, suffer abuse in their families, and experience violence in their communities. They are too often married off as children to men three times their age, and give birth to daughters whose lives will follow the same cycles of exploitation…

The world’s 600 million girls are our greatest return on investment. The time has come for our dollars to follow our research and our rhetoric. As a global community, we can no longer afford to look away. [link]

We must invest in women and girls around the world – as an affirmation of dignity that we can never give but as a reminder of that which has been already given to them by God.

“Diana Keesiga is an example of a young woman who is changing her community and world. Diana is a strong young woman who saw a problem in her community and decided to learn how to fix it.”

I believe in this so much.
How much?

Well, the board at ODW extended a $75,360 matching grant in our collaboration with The Adventure Project. Meaning, we believe in this in the amount of $37,680.

Development is messy but if done well, it can make a significant impact in the lives of people and communities. This Saturday is World Water Day…and I invite you to join me and others.

Invest in the Dianas. Invest in People. Invest in Water.

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4 Responses

  1. Bruce Strom says:

    Thank you! Please continue to push this message. Way too much aid flows out of this country through paternalistic channels. If our purpose is developing the God-given talent within each person (male and female), then it is absolute arrogance to believe we have all the answers and need to help those poor, destitute people. Even your photos convey the right message instead of advancing a stereotype. I don’t hear this message often enough so deeply appreciate your servant leadership in this.

  2. […] into this process of discerning how to handle my male privilege. Yesterday morning, I encountered a blog post that touches on exactly that […]

  3. […] this is a great post by the leader of One Day’s Wages… please read! […]

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stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. Thanks for your prayers. 
I have numerous stories to share but for now, the following came up in every conversation with Iraqi/Syrian refugees:

1 Have tea with us. Or coffee. Or juice. Or something with lots of sugar in it. Or better yet, all of the above.
2 We want peace. We want security. 
3 We hate ISIS. 
4 We just want to go home.
5 Please don't forget us.

Please don't forget them... Father, please bless and protect these Iraqi and Syrian "refugee" children that have already endured so much. Protect their hearts and mind from unfathomable trauma. Plant seeds of hope and vision in their lives. And as we pray for them, teach us how to advocate for them. Amen. "We don't call them refugees. We call them relatives. We don't call them camps but centers. Dignity is so important." -  local Iraqi priest whose church has welcomed many "relatives" to their church's property

It's always a privilege to be invited into peoples' home for tea - even if it's a temporary tent. This is an extended Yezidi family that fled the Mosul, Iraq area because of ISIS. It's indeed true that Christians were targeted by ISIS and thatbstory muat be shared but other minority groups like the Yezidis were also targeted. Some of their heartbreaking stories included the kidnapping of their sister. They shared that their father passed away shortly of a "broken heart." The conversation was emotional but afterwards, we asked each other for permission to take photos. Once the selfies came out, the real smiles came out.

So friends: Pray for Iraq. Pray for the persecuted Church. Pray for Christians, minority groups like the Yezidis who fear they will e completely wiped out in the Middle East,, and Muslims alike who are all suffering under ISIS. Friends: I'm traveling in the Middle East this week - Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. (Make sure you follow my pics/stories on IG stories). Specifically, I'm here representing @onedayswages to meet, learn, and listen to pastors, local leaders, NGOs, and of course directly from refugees from within these countries - including many from Syria.

For security purposes, I haven't been able to share at all but I'm now able to start sharing some photos and stories. For now, I'll be sharing numerous photos through my IG stories and will be sharing some longer written pieces in couple months when ODW launches another wave of partnerships to come alongside refugees in these areas. Four of us are traveling together also for the purpose of creating a short documentary that we hope to release early next year.

While I'm on my church sabbatical, it's truly a privilege to be able to come to these countries and to meet local pastors and indigenous leaders that tirelessly pursue peace and justice, and to hear directly from refugees. I've read so many various articles and pieces over the years and I thought I was prepared but it has been jarring, heartbreaking,  and gut wrenching. In the midst of such chaos, there's hope but there's also a lot of questions, too.

I hope you follow along as I share photos, stories, and help release this mini-documentary. Please tag friends that might be interested.

Please pray for safety, for empathy, for humility and integrity, for divine meetings. Pray that we listen well; To be present and not just be a consumer of these vulnerable stories. That's my biggest prayer.

Special thanks to @worldvisionusa and @worldrelief for hosting us on this journey. 9/11
Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.

Today, I had some gut wrenching and heart breaking conversations about war, violence, and peacemaking. Mostly, I listened. Never in my wildest imagination did I envision having these conversations on 9/11 of all days. I wish I could share more now but I hope to later after I process them for a few days.

But indeed: Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.
May it be so. Amen. Mount Rainier is simply epic. There's nothing like flying in and out of Seattle.

#mountrainier
#seattle
#northwestisbest

my tweets

  • Boom. Final fishing trip. Grateful. A nice way to end my 3 month sabbatical. #catchandrelease twitter.com/i/web/status/9… || 20 hours ago
  • Christians: May we be guided by the Scriptures that remind us, "Seek first the Kingdom of God" and not, "Seek first the kingdom of America." || 21 hours ago
  • Every convo with Iraqi/Syrian refugees included: 1 Have tea with us 2 We want peace 3 We hate ISIS 4 We want to go home 5 Don't forget us || 3 days ago
  • Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan to assess @OneDaysWages' partnerships & to film mini-documentary on refugee crisis. So many emotions. || 3 days ago
  • Pray for Mexico. For those mourning loved ones. For those fighting for life - even under rubbles. For rescue workers. Lord, in your mercy. || 3 days ago
  • Don't underestimate what God can do through you. God has a very long history of using foolish and broken people for His purposes and glory. || 6 days ago