Eugene Cho

homeless man donates thousands

This is such an amazing story. I read the story this morning and just started weeping.

It’s the story of a homeless man named Curtis Jackson who has raised over $9000 thus far to help with a “down-on-her-luck” banker named “Sandy.” According to the article:

A year ago, everything was going right for a woman we’ll call Sandy.

She had a good job at a bank in the suburbs.

She and her 10-year-old son had a safe home.

But then the world came crashing down around the 39-year-old. She lost her job. She lost her house. And she and her son moved into her truck. Police found her and DCFS threatened to take away her son if she didn’t find a safe place to stay.

She moved into a hotel with the help of a social worker who paid for a few nights stay with her own money.

There’s so much to learn from this article:

  • Never underestimate the good of humanity – even from those we often cast out to the margins.
  • Maybe we shouldn’t be too quick to judge the “homeless” person with that sign…
  • The best way to love our neighbor is to serve our neighbor.
  • Sow kindness and generosity. It’s gonna come back.
  • We’re all going to go through our down and out moments.

And how about this word of truth:

Jackson said he’s a man of faith; homeless, but not hopeless, and he’s got some words of wisdom for the people he sees bustling by every day.

“I have God. I’m one of the richest men on this earth, ’cause I have God,” he said. “Money is not my master. That’s what’s wrong with this world: money is its master.”

Wow. Amazing. Makes me wonder if we truly believe in the Gospel?

What are your thoughts?

Here’s the full article:

Homeless Chicago Man Donates Thousands to Down-On-Her-Luck Banker

A year ago, everything was going right for a woman we’ll call Sandy.

She had a good job at a bank in the suburbs.

She and her 10-year-old son had a safe home.

But then the world came crashing down around the 39-year-old. She lost her job. She lost her house. And she and her son moved into her truck. Police found her and DCFS threatened to take away her son if she didn’t find a safe place to stay.

She moved into a hotel with the help of a social worker who paid for a few nights stay with her own money. That’s when Sandy’s knight in shining armor showed up. And he’s kept showing up, every day, paying her hotel bill, so she and her son can stay off the streets.

But Sandy’s Good Samaritan isn’t a Chicago big shot. He isn’t living in a Loop highrise. He doesn’t even have a job.

Sandy’s Good Samaritan is Curtis Jackson, who’s been homeless since 2004. He pays for Sandy’s hotel room because she used to treat him with dignity and kindness when she did have a house — and he pays for it by panhandling and giving the money to her.

“All I can do is get out there and put a sign in my hand, or put a cup in my hand and ask people to help me out, and everything I get, except maybe bus fare and something to eat, I give it to her,” Jackson said as he stood at the corner of 55th and Harlem.

Jackson pays the nightly bill by pouring his bucket of change on the hotel counter. Since December, he’s raised $9,000, and he’s given it all to Sandy. He said sometimes 40, 70, a hundred cars go by before someone gives him a few pennies or a few bucks.

Sandy can’t believe it.

“I’ve donated to charities, I’ve helped other homeless families — never realizing that one day we’d be in this situation,” she said. “So thank God that we did have an angel waiting for us.”

Jackson said he’s a man of faith; homeless, but not hopeless, and he’s got some words of wisdom for the people he sees bustling by every day.

“I have God. I’m one of the richest men on this earth, ’cause I have God,” he said. “Money is not my master. That’s what’s wrong with this world: money is its master.”

Sandy said she doesn’t think she’ll ever be able to repay Jackson, who’s become like a brother.

“I’m out here for a purpose: to help someone, and that’s all I’m trying to do is help someone that needs help right at this moment,” he said. “And once she doesn’t need help anymore, I’ll move on to something else.”

Filed under: , , , ,

25 Responses

  1. I’m weeping at work right now.

    I don’t understand how I’ve skated by life without really loving the poor and could still call myself a follower of Christ. I am ashamed. Just completely ashamed.

    This morning, before I even read this story, I was crying on the subway trying not to make a scene while God was absolutely convicting me that I need to love the least of these.

    Last night I cried in my bed after coming to know of Eliot Rausch and his work of giving a voice to the voiceless.

    It’s time. I need to act. I can’t live like this anymore.

  2. Robin says:

    I saw this article earlier this am and loved it. Always to remember that money is not my master and trying to remember to live that way.

  3. Darrell says:

    This is incredible. I have met a couple of homeless guys in my life that have similar hearts for the Lord and compassion for other. It is really a beautiful thing. I love hearing stories like this.

    Thanks for sharing.

  4. Sejin says:

    I can’t believe it. At the same time I can. I was once sharing the Gospel to James and Dale. James was a homeless man and Dale was on the verge of becoming one. In the middle of our conversation, James gives Dale about $2 (all that he has), only to find out a few seconds later that there was change rattling in his pockets. He laid out the 50 cents in the palm of his hands and said, “God will multiply”.

    I shed many tears that night. I will definitely spread Curtis’s story around.

  5. the trash translator says:

    I heard a rumor….
    I hear that the ten year old is HIS son. That panhandling is his hustle. That he would not do odd jobs for less than 25/hr because he made more doing nothing. And that they are a couple and have been together for more than a decade.

    Maybe he should have kept his face of the news, too.
    Makes you go hmm…

    • catesongbird says:

      Thanks for bringing a possible reality to this story. I still think the story speaks volumes to the kind of generosity and love that moves people’s hearts to tears. Also, if what you’re saying is true, then actually, good for him for taking care of his son. He’s actually not “doing nothing” – he’s raising money! Panhandling is work too! haha!

    • Eugene Cho says:

      huh. do you have a link?

    • Andy M says:

      While I do think we need to see the reality instead of turning stories such as this into perfect tear inspiring examples of love, when sometimes they aren’t quite that. We also need to be careful not to disregard the story entirely because the people involved may not be saints.

      Odd jobs are not consistent jobs. Panhandling may be more consistent and so that is what he chose to do. When you are homeless you aren’t necessarily worried about what is respectable, you are worried about shelter and food. And Panhandling is not a hustle when you are homeless. He also may be incapable of getting a steady job, like many unemployed people today, and being homeless makes it all that more difficult.

      I find it unlikely that a banker was having a romantic relationship with a homeless guy. Not to say it couldn’t happen, but it would be very out of the ordinary. If he is the child’s father, but they split and he is now homeless, then it is still commendable as he is taking care of his ex, and his child.

      All in all, it seems a beautiful story to me, and a challenge to us who are more fortunate.

    • Eugene says:

      In reply to your curiosity of this man. My wife and I met this man one day coming off a the ramp with a flat tire. He changed our tire and accepted nothing but a thanks.After talking to him, we discovered that he does have children and a kind heart. He told us he had three children, all whom all grown. Get your facts right before judging him and spreading lies not rumors.I would know this about him because as it turns out, he knew some of my relatives and I found out I knew some of his!

  6. This is so amazing and inspiring! I’ve been thinking a lot about generosity lately, and this story makes me realize that my version of generosity is often one that leaves me feeling good, but safe in what I keep back for myself. Wow.

  7. […] (b) Now having read Spivey’s post, read Eugene Cho’s powerful reporting entitled homeless man donates thousands. […]

  8. Pat Pope says:

    Makes you wonder why he hasn’t taken the money to dig himself out of his own hole, but it’s the ultimate example of selflessness. Now I hope that someone will help him.

  9. Jo Ann says:

    To The Trash Translator: Jesus had skeptics too. And He certainly proved them wrong. I hope you’re proven wrong too!

  10. […] Homeless man donates thousands This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. […]

  11. shantel says:

    I have worked with the homeless and have met some very kind hearted. They are some homeless peopl who remain homeless do to mental issues, hurts or just plain fear of main streaming back into society. Often bought into the American dream and lost it all or mayb subtance abuse but after a while they become comfortable being homeless and actually feeling free and relieved without the presures of every day life. We actually have worked with some homeless to simple help them make the mental or emtional connection to want reconnect to main stream society. I think the have a feeling of being let down to the exstreme and will often help others cause they know what its like. One homeless guy would help us help other homeless people to take shelter but wouldnt take it for himself. I hear they got him to go in by helping him make the connection that he could help other homeless people in doing so. I also hear he is staff at the shelter now.

  12. Roland says:

    I don’t want to live for this world, but for the next. Storing up treasures in heaven. Your reward is in heaven Curtis. Christ is alive!!! And working/walking in us…

  13. […] Originally posted: Homeless man donates thousands. […]

  14. Christian X says:

    What a moving story! If only all of us could have such faith.

  15. […] thankful for Ameneh. I’m thankful for the stories of others like Curtis Jackson – a homeless man that rescued a down-and-out banker named Sandy (and her kid) from […]

  16. Fred says:

    I’m going to work 40/hrs a week busting my a@@ off and this guy is making more money than I am just walking around holding a sign. $9000 over 4 months! Sign me up!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on. I have to remind myself of this every day...because I can forget every day:

Don't be lazy and make assumptions about people. Ask about their story. Then listen. Be humble. Be teachable. Be human. Be a good neighbor. It's a sad reality but our society runs on the currency of fear. Don't feed into this frenzy.

Rather, invest in faith, hope, and love.

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,459,896 hits