Eugene Cho

freedom is [not] free

I have often heard and read the phrase:

“Freedom is not free.”

And while that may be true, it sums up for me one of the greatest examples of our human depravity.

Freedom.

Freedom is created by God.

Freedom is one of the greatest gifts God has given unto His creation.

But because of sin, rebellion, and human depravity –

is no longer free for all as God desired.

On this memorial day, I express my gratitude to the men and women – past and present – that have served in the military to protect and serve this country.  On this Memorial Day, I especially want to honor those who have died in service to this country.

On this day, I express my gratitude to others (even beyond the military) that has sought to use their lives, voices, and influence to advocate for the rights and freedoms for all of humanity.

But I also hope that while we share our appreciation of those that have served past and present, we would not forget that conflict and war in itself reflects the fallen and broken nature of humanity. While we acknowledge and appreciate, may we be that much more pursuant of the peace and shalom that God intended in the beginning and that God will consummate and restore on the Day.

May we always remember that we serve the Kingdom of God rather than the empire of nations.

We live in broken and fallen world but nevertheless, we believe in a God that created this world in beauty. Sin and rebellion enters into the human story but despite this sin, brokenness, and rebellion, we believe in a God that sent his son, Christ, to not only reconcile the world but to usher a Kingdom that will – one day – restore all things back unto Himself. God is on the move. God has a trajectory and this trajectory is to restore all things back unto Himself.

As we take time to honor those that have given their lives, may we never stop longing for peace.

I long for peace. I yearn for peace. I pray for peace. And I certainly await the day when God will restore all things.

But I don’t just want to wait, yearn, and pray for something, I want to participate – even in my small ways – in the trajectory of what I believe God has already put into motion. I want to call and invite others to live in the way of the peace: Blessed by the peacemakers.

Also, check this out: Flying a Fallen Soldier Home.

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10 Responses

  1. I hope people go out of their way to thank a military person when they come across one on the street (they kind of stick out.) I know I’m kind of shy about approaching strangers, but they are always gracious and thankful for a citizen recognizing what they are doing.

    • Patty Varnes says:

      I totally agree here, I to sometimes have a problem addressing total strangers but there is a familiar connection when I come across our military…..I feel like this if they are willing to lay it all on the line for me and my country and I am a stranger to them how much less harder should it be to extend my heart in gratitude to them when I see them in crossing?

  2. James says:

    “But the wisdom that comes from heaven is first of all pure; then peace-loving, considerate, submissive, full of mercy and good fruit, impartial and sincere. Peacemakers who sow in peace raise a harvest of righteousness.” – James 3:17,18

  3. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Eugene Cho, Jota Mossadihj, Jota Mossadihj, joshua a watson, joshua a watson and others. joshua a watson said: RT @eugenecho: “Freedom is not free” sums up one of the greatest examples of our human depravity – http://bit.ly/bjDCyJ […]

  4. […] freedom is [not] free « eugene cho says: Monday, May 31, 2010 at 2:02 am […]

  5. Brian Kiley says:

    Well said.

  6. Jaycee says:

    I enjoyed reading this. Thank you.

  7. Jon says:

    Well said. It important to keep that tension in view. Thanks for the reminder.

  8. Mickey Gallagher says:

    It never ceases to amaze me that people who consider themselves Christians continue to find ways to justify killing in the name of a nation-state. There were many Iraqi and Palestinian brothers and sisters in Christ who have been killed by U.S. bombs and warplanes, just as there have been many Iraqi, Afghani, and Palestinian Muslims who have died because of those same bombs. Are some deaths more important or tragic in the eyes of God? I don’t think Jesus is pleased with any reason for killing in war, whether it be for “freedom” or “democracy” or because it is believed to be “His will.” As long as Christians find ways to justify war and to celebrate those who perpetuate it, angels will continue to weep. For as the songwriter John Prine once wrote : “Your flag decal won’t get you into Heaven anymore / We’re already overcrowded from your dirty little war / And Jesus don’t like killin’ no matter what the reason for / And your flag decal won’t get you into Heaven anymore.”

  9. Al Engler says:

    War is indeed a terrible thing. I’ve seen it first hand. I also met the Lord and experienced the only true peace – peace with God through Jesus Christ during my military service. I then spent the next twenty years as a missionary to the U.S. Military. I still supervise people that serve in that capacity. As I said, war is a terrible thing, but consider this question. Do we want to leave war in the hands of the unredeemed? Or as long as wars exist, would it not be better to have people serving in our military who answer to Jesus?

    Jesus, during His life and ministry, had opportunities to declare the military profession “off-limits.” To the woman caught in adultery, He said, “Go and sin no more.” He could have given these same instructions to the Roman centurion in Matthew, chapter 8, but He didn’t. If Jesus wanted to condemn this man for serving the evil, Roman nation-state, this encounter provided an ideal opportunity. Instead, He commended the Roman soldier for his faith.

    The centurion replied, “Lord, I do not deserve to have you come under my roof. But just say the word, and my servant will be healed. For I myself am a man under authority, with soldiers under me. I tell this one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and that one, ‘Come,’ and he comes. I say to my servant, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” When Jesus heard this, he was astonished and said to those following him, “I tell you the truth, I have not found anyone in Israel with such great faith” (Matthew 8:5-10)

    John the Baptist also had direct communication with soldiers, who asked him how they should show works of righteousness in their lives. This is a vital passage of Scripture for people in the military.

    Then some soldiers asked him, “And what should we do?” He replied, “Don’t extort money and don’t accuse people falsely–be content with your pay” (Luke 3:2-3, 7-8, 14).

    This was an important question from the soldiers. What should soldiers do to “produce fruit in keeping with repentance”? John could have said other things, including, “Get out of the military. It’s immoral, and you shouldn’t be involved!” But he didn’t. Speaking as a prophet, inspired by God, he told soldiers not to abuse their power and to lead honest, content lives. This is still true today. Both Jesus and John the Baptist could have condemned military service as an option for men and women of God. They did not.

    Now, I know that there will come a time when Jesus “will take away the chariots from Ephraim and the war-horses from Jerusalem, and the battle bow will be broken” (Zech. 9), and that causes me to appreciate believers today who are pacifist. They are probably a little ahead of me, because there will eventually be no soldiers needed in the Kingdom (or policemen or locksmiths or probably doctors). I also greatly appreciate those Christ followers who dive into the grey area of military service and lay their lives down for our nation and more importantly (in the case of believers) for the sake of the gospel.

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One Day’s Wages

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"He must become greater; I must become less." - John 3:30 We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

Be faithful.

PS: Also, it helps to get some Vitamin D especially if you live in the rainy Northwest Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on.

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