Eugene Cho

theology of singlehood 4 – don’t kiss dating good-bye and the most important things…

In my final message on a theology of singlehood, I share thoughts about:

  • Having faith vs allowing cynicism and pessimism to rule over us.
  • The importance of wisdom.

But most of the sermon is focused on two main areas:

Don’t kiss dating good-bye meaning that I’m a fan of Christians dating but Christians shouldn’t adopt a worldly or self-centered perspective of dating that can equate to recreational dating or that perpetuate a state of immaturity and irresponsibility that is impacting many people [and not just “the young”]. I’m personally a fan of dating because we really need to take time to build healthy friendships to even consider the possibility of dating and beyond. But in lieu of the question, “Should we date or not,” the more important questions are:

  • Who are you? [Are we mature enough]
  • And how do you date? [Who are you when no one’s watching you?]

“What’s the most important thing as you consider someone for marriage?”

We all have our answers. I’d love to hear yours but let me also say that my concern is that we simply can’t reduce the answers to “the one most important thing.” There’s simply too many things. It’s too important and frankly, it’s too complex. All this time, I prided myself in being a simple dude…and that I ain’t. And so is my wife. Imagine the additional complexities (and combustion) of two people coming together to become one…for life.

And while there are numerous helpful resources and advice, I share three for folks to consider: Passion. Vision. Mission. If you’ve got some time, I’d encourage you to watch it or listen to it via podcast.

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One Day’s Wages

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41 years ago today, our family immigrated to the United States from Seoul, South Korea. I was six years old; the youngest of three sons. My father, when he was also six, fled from what is now known as North Korea. Just recently, he shared with me that he and some of his family had been in a refugee camp when war and violence broke out on the Korean peninsula. It's emotional thinking about what my brothers and I went through coming to a completely foreign country. It wasn't easy. And then, I think about what my parents had to go through:

They fled their homes near Pyongyang which also meant leaving some of their extended families.

They experienced unfathomable hunger and poverty.

They experienced the pain of war.

They immigrated again to the United States as adults with minimal resources and a handful of English words.

All in hopes that their children would have the opportunities that were never afforded to them.

I'm thinking of my brothers today. I'm thinking of my parents and honoring them for their sacrifice and tenacity. And finally, I'm thinking of refugees and immigrants all around the world that are yearning for family, peace, hope, and opportunities. Don't reduce Martin Luther King Jr. to a yearly quote on social media. Live out the dream. Seek first the Kingdom of God. Confront evil. Be a truth-teller. Seek justice. Love mercy. Pursue reconciliation. Build bridges. Love your neighbors. Forgive your enemies. Pray unceasingly. Live a committed life of peace, love, and justice.

The God who deposited this dream into MLK is still speaking to us today.

Be brave. "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." ~ Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Here's the full context of his famous quote: "The ultimate weakness of violence is that it is a descending spiral, begetting the very thing it seeks to destroy. Instead of diminishing evil, it multiplies it. Through violence you may murder the liar, but you cannot murder the lie, nor establish the truth. Through violence you murder the hater, but you do not murder hate. In fact, violence merely increases hate. Returning violence for violence multiplies violence, adding deeper darkness to a night already devoid of stars. Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate. Only love can do that." An important word for the Church... Oh, how God loves the nations. The Scriptures make this so clear. No one - let alone, the leader of a country - should ever disparage other nations with such a disgusting comment.

To the beautiful people of Haiti, El Salvador, and of the many countries of Africa: We are so sorry. Please accept our apologies on behalf of President Trump.

I've had the privilege of being in Haiti twice and numerous countries in Africa including Kenya where I took this picture during an afternoon drive near Kijabe. In many of these visits, I witnessed such creativity, courage, leadership, hospitality and kindness. To follow Jesus without obedience, repentance, self-denial, and dying to self is an oxymoron. In other words, are we more in love with the idea of following Jesus than actually following Jesus?

Grateful for an incredible Sunday at @seattlequest of beginning our 21 Days of Prayer and Fasting.

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