Eugene Cho

odw featured in the seattle times!

picture by Jim Bates of the Seattle Times

Thanks for your support. Only together – literally – can we ensure the end of extreme poverty. I know there are so many worthwhile causes.

Let’s celebrate, support, and cheer on these efforts and the people behind them.

We’re not here to compete w/ others. We want to celebrate the work and efforts of so many different causes and the people and communities behind them. And so with that, I hope you can help support, cheer on, and even celebrate the work of One Day’s Wages.

Here’s the article: Local Charity Based on Donating a Day’s Salary (or click on image above).

The compelling aspect of ODW is that 100% of your donations (minus transaction costs) go to projects on the ground YOU CHOOSE to fight extreme global poverty. While we may not be able to fix the world, our investments can help change the life of a child, a mother, a father, a family, and even a village.

Here’s three other 5 PRACTICAL things you can do to give us “a bump’:

1. VISIT THE WEBSITE and create an account. Just creating an account is a simple great way to support us.

2. MAKE A DONATION. Calculate your day’s wages on the website or make another donation. You can choose to invest in one of the 3 incredible organizations/projects highlighted on the website. 100% of your donations (minus transaction costs) go directly to these projects.  (check out the partnerships below)

3. BE A FAN ON FACEBOOK. Join us on FB and share our Page on Profile.

4. SPREAD THE WORD. Use the tools on our website (like Twitter), share the video below on your FB profile, email this link, or use the SHARE button below.

5. BE CREATIVE. Host a party, a dinner, do a benefit concert, talk to your company, or any gathering to help raise awareness and invite people to JOIN you in donating their day’s wages.

PS: Check out our current partnerships:

  1. Clean Sanitation & Water Well for an entire Ethiopian school (charity: water)
  2. 250 Fresh Start Kits for Congolese women
  3. Border Outpost between Nepal/India to support girls caught in human trafficking.

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8 Responses

  1. I’ll be in touch…

    as soon as I get some wages again.

    Sigh.

  2. Eugene Cho says:

    @Holiday Longing: these are tough times for many people.

    don’t feel obligated to donate your one day’s wages but you’re also welcome to even make another donation. another great way to support our work is to create a profile on the ODW website if you haven’t done so already.

    e

  3. evannak says:

    just curious, odw is a non-profit that raises money to give to another non-profit, that in turn gives to a cause. doesnt this seem to be counter-productive? why not just spread the message to give directly to that charity?

  4. Eugene Cho says:

    @evannak: thanks for stopping.

    we don’t believe it’s counterproductive.

    we will raise awareness.
    we will join our voices for advocacy.
    we will gather people to pool our funds together for projects.
    we will share stories of people doing amazing things.

    and if people want to bypass odw and give directly to organizations, that would be AWESOME.

    the point is we want to see more people engage these issues of injustice.

    glad to hear that you are doing your part. thanks.

  5. evannak:

    My former church started a non profit to funnel both resources and funds to many other ministries in New York City (Hope for New York). Sure, folks could give directly to the other ministries. However, because HFNY was associated with a large church, it gave the attendees access to volunteer and giving opportunities that they might not otherwise have had. In the end, both church attendees and non profits supporte by HFNY gained more than they would have otherwise.

  6. evannak says:

    thanks eugene and holiday for your responses. when i say counter-productive i wonder if the non-profit sector is clothing itself in good deeds but in reality it just is another capitalistic model for business. if ODW receives a $1 donation, up to 10% will go to the costs of doing business, then that .90 goes to another non-profit, where most likely another 10% will go to that non-profits costs of doing business, then the left overs are given to the cause. i like that ODW is an advocate for other organizations, but i want to make sure my donation goes to those in need and not in the non-profit business, especially more than one. looking at ODW it looks like double-dipping in my opinion. not trying to be harsh, but asking why.

  7. Eugene Cho says:

    @evannak:

    define “capitalistic model for business.” i’ll wait to hear your answer because i define that as people using charity to make money for themselves.

  8. daniel so says:

    evannak — If you’re interested in making a donation and want to know more about how it works, read the FAQs on the One Day’s Wages site (http://www.onedayswages.org/donate/faq-about-donations):

    “ODW uses 100% of the money raised to directly grant proven organizations, projects, and causes around extreme global poverty.” Sums up ODW’s approach pretty clearly. Operations funds are raised separately.

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One Day’s Wages

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It. Still. Hurts.
#TamirRice Incredible news: @onedayswages is projecting to have our most impactful year as we grant out $1.3 million dollars! Thank you so much for your prayers and support...please read on to learn how you can join in our work.

As you gather with family, friends, and loved ones for Thanksgiving and the holidays, I wanted to share an opportunity. Often times, when I speak to people about the privilege of generosity, I remind them, "You don't have to but you get to." It's so true.

My wife and I (and our three kids) started ODW in 2009. We felt the Holy Spirit convicting us to give up our year's salary. It wasn't an easy thing to say "Yes" or "Amen" to but we made the decision to obey. As a result, it took us about three years to save, simplify, and sell off things we didn't need.

It's been an incredible journey as we've learned so much about the heart of God and God's love for the hurting and vulnerable around the world - particularly those living in extreme poverty. ODW is a small, scrappy, grassroots organization (with just 3 full-time employees) but since our launch, we've raised nearly $6 million dollars to help those living in extreme poverty: clean water and sanitation, education, maternal health, human trafficking, refugee crisis, hunger, and the list goes on and on.

So, here's my humble ask: As we do this work, would you consider making a pledge to support our work...so that we can keep doing this work with integrity and excellence?
You can make a one time gift or make monthly pledge of just $25 (or more). Thanks so much for considering this: http://onedayswages.org/give (link in bio, too) Don't just count your blessings. Bless others with your blessings. Here, there, everywhere. Be a blessing for this blesses our Father in Heaven and builds the Kingdom of God.

#ReThinkRegugees #WeWelcomeRefugees
@onedayswages Grateful. Still reflecting on the letters that I've received from classmates and students that have come before me and after me. Never imagined all that God would have in store for me. Lots of humbling things but in the midst of them, there were literally thousands upon thousands of daily decisions and choices to be faithful. That's what matters. Seen or unseen. Noticed or unnoticed. You do your best and sometimes you stumble and fumble along but nevertheless, seeking to be faithful.

Also, you know you're getting old when your school honors you with a Distinguished Alumni Award. Lol. 47 is the new 27. Or something like that. Here's to the next 47. In our culture, we can be so obsessed with the "spectacular" or "glamorous." The Church often engagws in thia language and paradigm...but what if God has called many of us to small, ordinary things?

Will we still be faithful?
Will we still go about such things with great love and joy?

I recently came across this picture taken by @mattylew, one of our church staff...and I started tearing up: This is my mother; in her 70s; with realities of some disabilities that make it difficult for her to stand up and sit down...but here she is on her knees and prostate in prayer. She doesn't have any social media accounts, barely knows how to use her smartphone, doesn't have a platform, hasn't written a book, doesn't have any titles in our church, isn't listed as a leader or an expert or a consultant or a guru. But she simply seeks to do her best - by God's grace - to be faithful to God. She prays for hours every day inteceding for our family, our church, and the larger world.

Even if we're not noticed or celebrated or elevated...let's be faithful. Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant. And not even successful in the eyes of the world.

Be faithful. Amen. #notetoself (and maybe helpful for someone else)

At times, we have to say ‘NO’ to good things to say ‘YES’ to the most important things.

We can't do it all.
Pray and choose wisely.
Then invest deeply.

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