Eugene Cho

all jesus wants is to eat with you

last supper by leonard da vinci

There are numerous significant theological and biblical meanings behind the Last Supper (Passover Seder) and while the pursuit of those meanings are worthwhile and powerful, here’s the most simple and as significant:

Jesus wants to eat with us.

Let me say that again.  The Triune God of the cosmos not only created the world and humanity but desires fellowship, communion, and friendship.  And when sin entered the world and humanity to wreak  havoc and choas, God intervened again – with the redemptive mission of restoring Shalom – all that which God intended for us.

The Word became flesh and blood, and moved into the neighborhood (John 1:14 / The Message)

Throughout Jesus’ journey, he was eating with men, women, and children.  He ate with tax collectors, prostitutes, sinners, Romans, Gentiles, and even religious folks.

When you understand the significant cultural and spiritual meaning behind “eating together,” I completely understand why the religious folk couldn’t “get” Jesus.  Eating together = lifelong friendship.

Even during the Last Supper – in the presence of Judas who will betray Jesus for 30 sickly silver coins and with other disciples arguing and jockeying for position and power – all Jesus wants is to eat with them.

And herein lies the meaning, truth, and grace of the Gospel:

God/Jesus/Holy Spirit wants to be eternal communion and friendship with us.

He creates it, pursues it, and ultimately sends his Son to restore, redeem and reconcile that Relationship – as the perfect Sacrifice.  Truly amazing.

Here I am! I stand at the door and knock. If anyone hears my voice and opens the door, I will come in and eat with them, and they with me.

(Revelations 3:20)

And so, I encourage you:  Eat with Jesus.

***********************************************

If you’re interested, one of our community groups at Quest Church is hosting a Passover Seder meal on Thursday from 6.30-8.30pm at the church basement.  You’ll need to RSVP at office@seattlequst.org if you’re interested.

And lastly, I’m very excited about Easter Sunday @ Quest and the opportunity to share a meal together.  Last year, we ate like this:

quest easter lunch


Filed under: bible, christianity, church, emerging church, Jesus, quest church, , , ,

11 Responses

  1. Hilary says:

    Don’t forget the significant “Jewishness” of this Passover meal. This has many implications for the richness and depth of meaning that this ritual meal represents (freedom from captivity, God’s deliverance of His people, remembrance and reminding, and understanding of being a people “set apart”- holy unto the Lord.) Jesus didn’t simply “just want to eat” with them- they were performing a sacred Jewish festival commanded by Yahweh, and Jesus was showing his disciples that HE was the sacrifical lamb, instating a new covenant- His blood would be on the doorposts for them now.

    Not trying to be a stickler- what you said is beautiful- just wanting to remind us that there is a larger context here that would benefit us to remember and ponder. If you’ve never been to a Messianic Jewish Seder meal, I recommend it. It is one of the most enriching and awesome Easter experiences I’ve ever had.

  2. Derek says:

    Well written Eugene. Thanks for sharing the simple nature of the gospel.

  3. Beautiful post. Thank you, Eugene.

    I always thought that we Southerners were the only ones who appreciated the importance of food and fellowship, but judging by that picture, you guys could give us run for our money!

    A great book that made me think more seriously about the importance of sharing food/ the Lord’s Supper was “Take This Bread” by Sara Miles. She raises some good questions, including: should we share communion with believers as well as non-believers?

    Great post.

  4. Kacie says:

    I am SO JEALOUS of the amazing-looking Asian food you’re serving up in that picture. Church events here in Texas usually mean fried chicken or barbeque. Not that that’s bad… but I would … well… I would do a lot to get a good spread of Asian cuisine!

  5. cat m. says:

    oh snap! is that fresh lumpia in the right corner?!

    awesome.

  6. gsb says:

    shoot!… too bad the west never considers using rice as christ’s body in eucharist….because if they did, jesus would be present in that kim-bop!! it would be like feast and communion all in one bite…

  7. That spread looks awesome, Eugene!

  8. […] We can choose to belief the truth of the Gospel: God not only died for us but dwelt amongst us. He walked among us. And he did the most amazing thing: Jesus ate with humanity. […]

  9. […] A post by Eugene Cho this morning helps to direct thoughtful people toward a peaceful response asking what Jesus would do ? How do their/your/my (my addition) actions and stories testify to God’s work and invitation of reconciliation and redemption?  As Christians, we can find harmony in the beauty of the Gospel:  “For God loved the world so much that he gave his one and only Son, so that everyone who believes in him will not perish but have eternal life.” [John 3:16]  And because Christ has died for us, we can live for the work of reconciliation and redemption. I am not suggesting we be timid in our declaration of Christ as the way, the truth and the life.  But in doing so, we can also choose to lay down the sword and choose love and build peace.  We can choose to believe the truth of the Gospel: God not only died for us but dwelt amongst us. He walked among us. And he did the most amazing thing: Jesus ate with humanity. […]

  10. […] not only died for us but dwelt amongst us. He walked among us. And he did the most amazing thing: Jesus ate with humanity. In that simple expression of eating, he declared his desire for friendship.Read More… More on […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

"He must become greater; I must become less." - John 3:30 We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

Be faithful.

PS: Also, it helps to get some Vitamin D especially if you live in the rainy Northwest Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on.

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,460,851 hits