Eugene Cho

a day in frankfurt, germany

En route to South Africa, I had a 10 hour layover in Frankfurt, Germany.  After it took a few hours to rendezvous with a few folks I’m trekking with in South Africa for research and relationship building, I took several hours to attempt to soak in Frankfurt, Germany and here are some photos below for your enjoyment.

One of these days, I’d love to just backpack thr0ugh Europe.  Seriously, why can’t travel more inexpensive and accessible to everyone.  

Who’s traveled to Europe?  Where?  Reflections?

I’ve actually been to Germany before – many years ago and soaked in a little of Frankfurt, Hamburg, Cologne and a small town called Kreutztal.  I especially love just trying to soak in the culture of another country and people.  

Here are the pics:

Filed under: , travel,

18 Responses

  1. Joel says:

    I was in Germany a few months ago. A visit to former holocaust sites and the former nazi rally party grounds (now an incredible museum) were extremely sobering and fascinating. Pastor Eugene, not sure if you are traveling through Germany on the way back from S. Africa, but I’d recommend a day in Munich if you have a chance.

  2. goldfearsnofire says:

    Cool pictures Eugene. Although I live only two hours away (in Nurnberg) I have yet to explore much of Frankfurt. It looks nice. I have come to really love Germany for it’s quiet dignity, but strong tradition. I think that it’s always just rich to get outside of your comfort zone and experience somewhere new.

    Did you experience any Obama mania today? I went to an Obama party to watch the swearing-in this evening, and it was a pretty cool cross-cultural experience. There must have been about 100 people or so, and most of them were Germans. I think that he’s got a pretty big fan base over here!

    Hope that you have a good time in South Africa, and I will pray for potential seeds being sown.

    Aufwiedersehen!

  3. Ich bin eifersüchtig.

    For two summers Lorri & I hosted a high-schooler from Frankfurt am Main area. Florian was working for Urban Impact for two months.

    I told him that Florian was a very unusual name in the US for a male. I mean, when have you ever met a guy who goes by “Flo?”

    So, his first week I’m taking him around, he wants to go up the Space Needle, naturlich.

    I look at the ticket sales guy. Yup. There on his name tag: “Florian”

    What a world. Safe travels brother.

  4. hilarybarnett says:

    I spent a month as an exchange student in Muehlheim, a small town outside of Frankfurt. It was lovely! And the people are very friendly, not to mention German food- Yum. I chose to minor in German at school because of the wonderful experience I had there. I have that same exact shot of the Frankfurter Dom! It is a wonderful town. I would echo Joel though in saying that Munich is a must see, as well as Dachau. It is less than an hour away from Munich by bus or train.

  5. I’ve been privileged to live in Europe in the past. When I was a kid we lived in the Netherlands (Delft) and traveled around a lot during that time (1970’s). More recently my husband was working in the UK and our whole family moved there for about three years. We were able to do a lot of exploring in the UK and Ireland, along with the continent. Wonderful, wonderful! I’m glad you got to do a bit of looking around today, it’s one of my favorite things to do.

  6. jason says:

    I would love to go to Germany, my biological fathers family came from there

  7. onamatopoeia says:

    Beautiful photos. I’m actually half German. You should try going to Oldenburg when you have the time. It’s small and cute and quaint – perfect for photography. : )

  8. Jim Chen says:

    Love the colors! Thanks for sharing the pictures!

  9. remember ol times says:

    Do you remember the car without lights at night at the autobahn? You drove the car and did not see it and I took a long explanation to warn you, was it politeness or what? That really made us come close to nearly hit it.

    Sometimes we need to be straightforward, real good German straightforward.

  10. eugenecho says:

    @remember ol times:

    e: wow. i was thinking of you the entire time here and your family. you guys were such great hosts. how can i forget driving on the autobahn in the GTI. such great times.
    oh, and i also remember the incredible meals and bread every single day. you are missed and i hope you’re doing well!

  11. mary says:

    I’m currently in London right now for three months and have been surprised at how quickly it has come to feel like “home”. My husband and I will be traveling Europe for six weeks (Spain, Italy, Switzerland, Austria, Greece) this spring before we head back to the states. I am always impressed by the history here, in comparison with our young country.

  12. Ben C says:

    I only enjoyed Germany from visiting all the great automobile sites, namely Stuttgart for Porsche.

    I could live in Barcelona which is saying a lot.

    Italy was cool, but Rome was all right a bit too overrun with touristas.

    Paris needs a month alone to enjoy and a good local friend.

    I’ve been to other sites, but overall, I’m a huge fan of Europe. Great food. Healthier. And great driving roads.

  13. jessicaschafer says:

    I grew up in Germany, in the Black Forest, which is incredibly beautiful. My parents are missionaries out there (25 years!), and I have always felt so privileged to have grown up speaking another language and knowing another culture. I came back to Canada for college and have lived here since graduating, but what I miss the most about Europe is the sense of history. Old fortress ruins, beautiful cathedrals, walking paths that have been there for hundreds of years. I got to back “home” for Christmas this year and it was so great–cobblestones, German baking, my quaint little town with its slow pace of life and as someone else mentioned–the quiet dignity of its people.

  14. J. P. says:

    I visited my relatives in Saarbrücken in 1998 after a brief (and exciting) stay in Berlin where I nearly got mugged by a couple of skinheads… Also memorable was a brief drive on the Autobahn to the ancient city of Trier. Wish I could go again soon with my family!

  15. jan owen says:

    I’ve been to Paris and down to Chamonix, France and loved seeing the Alps. I went to Germany in 2008 while on sabbatical and went to Heidelburg to see a friend and then we wandered down into the Bavarian region. It was beautiful.

  16. Just Meee~ says:

    How ’bout picking ONE day next week and write something FUNNY and light…

    Life is getting to all of us… and I think we need a LITE-day…

  17. Kell says:

    I have family in frankfurt Germany that I have never met. Does the last name Zippold ring a bell?

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