Eugene Cho

an insider’s look at burma

Don’t forget the situation in Burma [Myanmar].  I got this incredible “insider’s look” from Teresa who received this from friends who are working within Burma.  Teresa and her husband, Rich, have been at Quest for about four years now and single handedly made us a multi-generational church when they joined us.  :-)  Like numerous at Quest, their faith in Christ and desire to live out the Gospel not only humbles me but helps shape the depth and direction of our church.  

She [finally] started a blog entitled Jewels in the Ashes.  Rich and Teresa and actively serve on the board of directors at World Aid based here in Seattle.  World Aid focuses much of their energy and work serving and empowering the Internally Displaced People [IDP] in Burma and refugees in the Thai/Burma border.  If you’re looking for someone trustworthy to donate money towards the relief efforts in Burma, Teresa and World Aid will get those funds where they need to get to.

Do yourself a favor and take 3 minutes to read this and invite others: Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health, religion

autistic boy banned from church

Update:  Read some of the comments from [self-claiming] parishioners of St. Joseph’s and their perspective on this situation.

Did anyone catch this news yesterday? Clearly, not the best publicity for this small Catholic church in Bertha, Minnesota.  Again, I want to give some level of benefit to the leadership of that church but something just doesn’t seem right with this story. 

The church leadership claimed that the autistic boy was extremely disruptive: 

“Fr. Walz said Adam struck a child, bolts unexpectedly from church nearly knocking people down, including elderly people. He said Adam also spits and urinates during church.”

QUESTION: So, if you were the priest, pastor, or amongst the leadership of that church, what would you have done if you genuinely felt like Adam’s presence disrupted the spirit and celebration of worship and communion or posed some sort of harm to the other congregants?  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health, religion,

say no to crack

This is an awkward post about breasts, buttcracks, beauty, lust, and the Christian response.  Let me share two posts that I read last week that provoked some thought.  The first post, “My Thoughts on Boobies,” is from Anne Jackson at FlowerDust exhorting Christian women to dress modestly and the second, “Is This All Men Think About?” is from Pete Wilson at Without Wax [a pastor in Nashville].

At Quest, there’s been a few Sundays where I’ve had to ask one of our female pastors to ask a female congregant or two to lower their shirts because it ain’t pretty to see crack anytime or anywhere but especially as you’re trying to worship Jesus.  But…that’s just me.  Say no to crack. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: church, health, religion

strategically fighting poverty

Please take a few minutes to read this.  We can’t save the world but we can make a difference. 

It’s in the news all around us:  the situation in Darfur; the cyclone catastrophe in Burma/Myanmar; unfathomable hunger in North Korea; the food crisis in numerous places around the world, and the list can and do go on.  Over 3 billion people live on less than $2/day; About 1 billion live on less than $1/day; Nearly 1.1 billion people do not have access to clean water; About 27,000-30,000 children die daily due to poverty.  Staggering and numbing statistics.

While it’s awkward to make a public appeal and broadcast of our vision, that is the decision that we’ve made – for better or worse.  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health, religion, , , ,

prayerfully fighting poverty

Thanks for the feedback on last week’s entry on [Wisely] Fighting Poverty.  After reading the responses, I wanted to share a few more details of what we’re envisioning.  Details are still to be worked through but here are some more random thoughts:

  • Our vision cannot eradicate poverty.  If I am honest, poverty – locally and globally – will likely persist on some level but extreme poverty can be eradicated.  But our simple hope is to be moved and move others into action because while we can’t save the world, we can help one child, one family, one village, one area, etc.  We can make a difference. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health, religion

wisely fighting poverty

It’s so easy to fall in love with the vision of something than to do the hard work to move towards bringing life and fruition to that vision. This has been the case for Minhee and I with the humanitarian organization for several years. While we know we’ll face some scrutiny, questions, and criticism, we are ready to move forward – even if we know we’ll make some mistakes along the way.

However, I’d love [and need] to hear some feedback from you about some elements that we hope will shape the humanitarian organization.  If you’re new to the blog, you may want to read Loudly Fighting Poverty and A Vision of Compassion & Redistribution.

OVERVIEW:  Our vision is to start a global organization to fight global poverty  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health, religion

my myers briggs profile

Six years ago ago, I took the Myers-Briggs at a churchplanters’ assessment and I was shocked to discover as I scrounged up the reports last week that I tested as an ENFJ.  I have a feeling I was trying really hard to be appear like an extroverted pastor with a bubbly infectious personality.

Since I was surprised, I retook the tests twice this past week and both times, I tested as an Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health

life is short

One of our church members, CW, had some persistent headaches several months ago and went in see his doctor for what he thought would be a routine check-up.  This is what I shared in an earlier entry [near the end of October 07]:

CW is only in his 30s and a wonderful guy.  In the past couple weeks, CW was experiencing some discomfort, dizziness, headaches, and general illness.  I actually remember chatting with his wife about it couple Sundays ago – it wasn’t that big of a deal.  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, health

myers-briggs personality type

During the Q/A at the workshop I co-led last week in Los Angeles, someone asked me what my Myers-Briggs personality type was and honestly, I don’t remember.  I do have to admit that I’m not a real big fan of these tests but I do know of folks that place much weight on them – particularly the Myers-Briggs.

Several years ago, I did take the test for an official assessment and have it on file somewhere but it’ll take me some time to find it. 

Anyone want to take a guess about my MB type?  What are you?  What do you think about the MB? Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health,

starbucks barista donates organ to customer

“Umm, I’ll take a tall double shot non-fat hazelnut latte with a kidney, please.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: health, , ,

stuff, connect, info

one day’s wages | video

My Instagram

People often ask, "How does one stand all that rain in Seattle?" Actually, it doesn't rain that much. I like the rain. Keeps everything "evergreen" and clean. Keeps our air fresh. What's challenging is the gray weather. Give me a few more sunny days. 99 more days to be specific. 
Regardless, still love this city. Checking out Canada in case I need to move up North after the presidential election. Just saying, eh.

Downtown Toronto. Fascinating architecture. Amazed by the diversity of this city. We desperately want our children to not just be captivated by the beauty of creation...but more importantly, to the actual Creator of all that is good and beautiful.

Actually, we want and need this truth for our souls, too. What a privilege. This isn't possible without all those who give, pray, and support the work of @onedayswages. This week, I signed and mailed grants to three partner organizations totaling over $170,000. These grants will empower people by supporting maternal health care, refugee relief efforts, access to clean water, provide education, etc.

Sometimes, the brokenness of the world feel so overwhelming but let's keep running the race with endurance. Let's keep pursuing justice, mercy, and humility. Let's be faithful and may we be spurred on to keep working for God's Kingdom...on earth as it is in heaven.

Again, thank you so much for your support for @onedayswages! My wife, Minhee, and I stand on the shoulders of praying mothers. I'd like to take a moment to honor my mother-in-law. It's hard to put words together to embody her life but she is a very special, anointed person. I'm so blessed to have her as a mother in my life.

She was a devoted wife until she lost her husband to cancer, mother to three daughters, and later became a pastor. She became a follower of Christ as an adult and as such, led her her family to Christ. In her late 50s, she obeyed God's calling to go to seminary and be a leader in the church. She graduated #1 in her class and reminded us that it's never too late to follow a new dream or calling.

As she'll soon celebrate her 80th birthday, I'm especially grateful for the ways that she poured into and prayed over Minhee and her other children.  Even though she's officially retired, I'm inspired that the concept of retirement is not in her vocabulary.  She continues to serve the local church, evangelize and bear witness to Christ, and goes to the early morning prayer meeting at 5am everyday to pray for our family, our church, and for others. 
Jangmonim, we love and honor you. 어머니, 사랑합니다.

Someday, I hope that when my kids speak of Minhee and I...above all, they would say with integrity that their parents prayed for them and kept pointing them to Christ. On this Mother's Day, I want to take a few words to honor mother.

There’s a moment from a few years ago that will stick with me until the day I die. It’s regarding Sung Wha, my mother.

Minhee and I were at a point of transition, between working at an ethnic Korean church in the northern suburbs of Seattle called Lynnwood and launching Quest in urban Seattle. As I shared earlier, I was in desperate need of a job. I had a mortgage to pay. A pregnant wife. A kid at home. 
Then, praise God, after months without work, I finally landed a job.

My mom was in between jobs at this point in her life. She was in her late fifties, but she had such bad knees and degenerative hips that it was, and is, difficult for her to walk. My mom is like a human barometer—when a storm is coming and when it rains, her hips throb. Although my parents lived in San Francisco, she was visiting us in Seattle to encourage us in this difficult season.

As I prepared to go to work one early morning, I walked downstairs to put on my jacket and shoes, and forgot that my mother woke up early every morning to pray. In fact, she had been praying for months that I would find a job. “Eugene, where are you going?” she said when she saw me.

I hadn’t told my mother the news that I had just recently been hired for the janitorial gig at Barnes and Noble. I chose not to because I thought she and my father would be devastated. I didn’t want them to think that after laboring, sacrificing, and doing so much for us over all those years that their son had failed them.

But I couldn’t lie to her, so eventually I told my mom that I got a job and was going to work. “Great! What job? What are you doing?” “Um, I’m working at Barnes and Noble as their custodian,” I said finally.

Without asking another question, my mother got up from the dining table where she had been reading her Bible and praying. She slowly walked slowly toward me.

She approached me, then walked past me without saying a word, and I realized she was headed toward the closet. She opened the closet door, put on her jacket, turned around and said to me (in Korean), “Eugene, let’s go together. I will help you.” This is my mother.

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,395,783 hits
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,409 other followers