Eugene Cho

Garrett Swasey: Christ Follower, Son, Husband, Father, Pastor, and Police Officer. We see you. We honor you.

PhotoGrid_1448697030787* Appreciate the comments and especially the critique via social email and email. Certainly shows my personal blind spots and privilege and my need to keep learning from others. Much to learn.

It’s just utterly tragic. I’m just starting to read the horrendous news of the shootings at Planned Parenthood in Colorado Springs. Information is still being gathered for the shooter, his motivations, and the victims.

One of the killed was a first responder – Officer Garrett Swasey, a six year veteran of the campus police force of Univ. of Colorado (Colorado Springs). It wasn’t even his responsibility as a campus police officer to respond to this incident but he chose to go. If this isn’t heroism, I don’t know what is…

Let’s be honest: There’s been so much horrible news of police brutality throughout our country…that only reveal a glimpse of the reality of police abusing their power and authority including and especially with their engagement with Black Americans. As some of you may know, I’ve been a vocal supporter of racial injustice issues (here, here, here, here, here, and here).  Now, please hear me: The power dynamics (abuse of power) can not and should not be ignored, denied, or avoided. As we go about this urgent work of racial justice and fighting against police brutality, if one is not wise and discerning, one can make the error of making generalizations about anyone and everyone associated with the police. This is certainly my confession.

Couple of my friends who are in the police force have shared this very new reality and tension:

“Eugene, folks don’t see us as human beings any more. They just see the uniform and thus, public enemy #1.”

This is important: To support one is not to reject the other. These two things should not be viewed as competing, contradictory, or antithetical. In other words, I’m trying to articulate – not very well – that one can and must challenge and protest against systemic injustice and still value the individuals that work with integrity within such difficult, unjust systems. These are indeed challenging and complex times….ones that require much prayer, courage, tenacity, and humility.

One easier-said-than-done way we can seek to remedy and fight against such generalizations is to choose to “see” each person. In other words, the intentionality behind the humanity of each person. This is clearly complex in the face of enormous structural and systemic issues and yet, this is so critical for us as Christians because we believe that each person is created in the Imago Dei – the image of God.

Clearly, I did not personally know Office Garrett. Never knew him. Never heard of him. And only now starting to soak in various narratives about his life. He was only 44 – one year younger than me. I’m sure like all of us, he had his flaws and failures but in reading about his story, this I know: I wish I had known him.

Penny, a friend just recently shared this with me on this very blog:

Officer Swasey served our little neighborhood and in fact came to our home in response to a call we made. He was also the personal pastor of what of our good friends. He could have chosen to stay on campus yesterday – leaving the CSPD officers and the El Paso County Police to handle the situation, but he instead went to protect and defend.

Garrett wasn’t just a “good” police officer. In other words, he was more than his uniform but even his uniform had purpose that was informed by his character and faith. He was also the husband to his wife, Rachel, and father to their two children: Elijah and Faith. All that knew him speaks deeply of his courage and faith in Christ. In fact, he we was also a co-pastor of a local church in Colorado Springs called Hope Chapel.

“Here’s a guy who worked full time as a police officer, and then gave a great amount of time to his local church and didn’t get a dime for it,” said Scott Dontanville, a co-pastor who knew Officer Swasey for 15 years. “He did it because it was the thing that he felt he needed to do.” [source]

Garrett Swasey: Christ Follower, Son, Husband, Father, Pastor, and Police Officer.

I never had the privilege of meeting you but…We see you. We honor you. We lift your wife, kids, family, church, and all those that are grieving your passing in heart and prayers. It is an honor to call you a brother-in-Christ and fellow co-laborer of the Gospel. Thank you for your courage and faith. As many mourn and grieve, may their tears turn to a growing peace – knowing that you are united and at peace with our God: Father, Savior, and Spirit.

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3 Responses

  1. Penny says:

    Officer Swasey served our little neighborhood and in fact came to our home in response to a call we made. He was also the personal pastor of what of our good friends. He could have chosen to stay on campus yesterday – leaving the CSPD officers and the El Paso County Police to handle the situation, but he instead went to protect and defend. Thank you for the post honoring him.

  2. Yea–several months ago I was talking to a couple black officers in my neighborhood (99% black) about the manner in which they walk our neighborhood (they will only walk it in groups). They are out of their squad cars because the Chief is fully invested in community oriented policing (which I fully support). My neighborhood is VERY supportive of the police and cooperate. I was taken back by the depth of anxiety they have about the threats they face.

    Neither the young officers nor the young men in community really have a historical sense of how we got to this point.

    I believe Faith community needs to affirm and support three types of groups: Public protest for reform; Political leaders for reform; and Police officers/leaders for reform. And we need to try to support them in unison–in terms that does not pit the groups against each other. e.g. Reducing the quantity and level of physical police-citizen confrontations is in the interest of all.

    Faith leaders need to continue to speak because it is the police we send after the society, communities and individuals have run off the cliff. We send them with a gun and badge to arrest our way out of all we have sowed.

  3. Danamarie Kelley says:

    Dearest Garrett Swasey Family,
    My prayers and loving thoughts are with you in these most difficult hours. I pray you will all be surrounded by loving family and friends to uplift, comfort and be with you. While I do not know any of you personally, I am humbled by your husband’s courageous actions and willingness to stand up for his Lord and Savior. May you “feel his presence” in the stark absence and rise to find comfort knowing he will always be in your hearts and watching over you from above.
    May God comfort and bless each of you.

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One Day’s Wages

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Made it to 47 years old. Grateful for God's grace and all those who believed in me, prayed for me, encouraged me, invested in me, forgave me, fed me, loved me, and _____ me.

I've come a long way since my first school picture  at the age of 6 - the age I immigrated to the United States. And long way to go. You can do it, sun. Break through the clouds. I love her. Saturday morning date at Pike Market with @minheejcho. Enjoying the final day of sun before 6 months of rain and gray. Not lol'ing. Some of my moat memorable travels have been to Myanmar (otherwise known as Burma). In fact, the vision of @onedayswages began on my first visit to this country in 2006. On a recent visit, I began learning about the Rohingya people. Sadly, it has escalated to horrendous, genocidal proportions.

Thus far, about 500,000 people have been driven out from Myanmar through violence...with most going to Bangledesh...regulated to a massive refugee camp. Stateless. Undocumented. Minority groups. Dehumanized. Homes and villages destroyed. And so much more unspeakable atrocities.

Yes, it's complex and messy. It always is. But the root of this injustice as the case for so much brokeness in the world is the sin of dehumanizing one anotber as..."the other." May we see each person, including the Rohingya people, as one who is created in the image of God. It's the truth and the remedy to the incessant dehumanization that goes on in our world.

Lord, in your mercy. The obedience of discipleship which includes the work of justice is a marathon. It's long, arduous, and emotional. Be tenacious. But also take care of yourself. Create healthy rhythms. Don't burn out. We need you for the marathon. Friends, don't give up. Press on. In the midst of so much chaos in the world, may we continue to cling to the hope of the whole Gospel. May we cling unto Jesus:

Way maker!
Miracle worker!
Promise keeper!
Light in the darkness!
That is who You are!

What an encounter with the Holy Spirit at @seattlequest today. Grateful for our worship team, the gospel choir, and the Audio/Visual team. Thank you Matt, Teresita, and Chris. Please thank all the volunteers for us.

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