Eugene Cho

These children share their dreams…and poignantly show that we still have a long way to go. #MLK

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On this Martin Luther King, Jr. day, it would be good to take a moment to pause, reflect and honor this man.

Martin Luther King Jr. was an extraordinary person.  Not perfect but nevertheless, extraordinary.  And as we pause, reflect, and honor this man…it would be prudent for us to consider how far we’ve come and how far we must go.

Clearly, we live in a much better world today in comparison to the days of slavery, lynchings, and Jim Crow. We live in a better day in comparison to the Japanese internment camps. We live in a better day in comparison to yesterdays when women weren’t allowed to vote.

Clearly. Thankfully.

There is much to celebrate…genuinely and sincerely.

But let’s not be fooled.
Let’s not fall asleep.
We have a long way to go.
We have much work to do.

We must keep pursuing and seeking the Kingdom of God. And to give one glimpse of how far we must go, I wanted to share (anonymously) with you some perspectives of children because while they may still be young of age, there’s something about their raw honesty and painful innocence that can challenge us.

I know because we have three children in our home…and sometimes, the questions they ask and comments they make. “Out of the mouths of…”

We have numerous teachers that attend Quest Church and one of them contacted me this week – heartbroken by many of the replies given by her students in response to the assignment to complete the sentence: “I have a dream…” Many of these teachers purposefully teach in low-income schools. I admire them, respect them, pray for them, and honor them…because what they do truly matter. They are living out the Gospel – and that’s often difficult to do in the public school systems but they do their best – in all their own personal brokenness – to love Christ and love on these children.

Here are some of their answers. I don’t know about you but I want our kids – all our kids, of every color, of every background – to be able to dream in ways that capture and fascinate their imagination…which is why there’s a deep poignancy in reading their “honest” dreams:

“I have a dream…That I will not be poor when I grow up.”

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“I have a dream…That imagrant can cross the border so they could see their families.”

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“I have a dream…My dream is that Cambodia will have more (?) better houses and better streets in the future.

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“I have a dream…that everybody will have a home.”

dream

And of course, it wouldn’t really be authentic if there wasn’t a kid that wasn’t dreaming to be an NFL player. And specifically, a Seahawks player. #GoHawks

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Be a drum major for justice.

Yes, we have much to be grateful for…but don’t fall asleep.
We have a long way to go.
We have much work to do.

In the words of Dr. King, we have to keep beating the drums:

“Yes, if you want to say that I was a drum major, say that I was a drum major for justice.
Say that I was a drum major for peace.
I was a drum major for righteousness.
And all of the other shallow things will not matter.
I won’t have any money to leave behind.
I won’t have the fine and luxurious things of life to leave behind.
But I just want to leave a committed life behind…”

Finally, I want to remind you that at the core of his life, Martin Luther King Jr. was a follower of Jesus Christ. His faith in Christ informed all that he sought to do as a man, a pastor, husband, father, and civil rights leader.

And that is precisely why his dream did not die upon his assassination. Because it wasn’t his dream.  This dream is bigger than one man, one race, one gender, and one generation.

God is behind it all…
And God is still stirring.
And God is still speaking into our dreams.

May we have the courage to pursue Jesus and the Kingdom of God. We wait for Christ to return to restore all things, but while we wait, we must actively partner with God to work towards that restoration.

“When our days become dreary with low hovering clouds of despair, and when our nights become darker than a thousand midnights, let us remember that there is a creative force in this universe, working to pull down the gigantic mountains of evil, a power that is able to make a way out of no way and transform dark yesterdays into bright tomorrows. Let us realize the arc of the moral universe is long but it bends toward justice.” –  Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Don’t reduce Martin Luther King Jr. to a yearly quote.
Live out the dream.
Live a life committed to peace, love, and justice.

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5 Responses

  1. […] These Children Share Their Dreams… and poignantly show that we still have a long way to go. (on eugenecho.com) […]

  2. Lori says:

    …that Cambodia will have more mone=money, probably. Thanks for posting this and sharing their dreams.

  3. Brian says:

    Beautiful. Sharing this with my kids.

  4. Garrett says:

    Thanks for writing this, Pastor E!

  5. Al says:

    A long, long way! That MLK quote gets me every time! (along with many others!) Thanks for all you do to keep THE DREAM alive, brother!

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One Day’s Wages

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"He must become greater; I must become less." - John 3:30 We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

Be faithful.

PS: Also, it helps to get some Vitamin D especially if you live in the rainy Northwest Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on.

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