Eugene Cho

building bridges > burning bridges

Do yourself a favor and watch this. It’s 7:15 minutes long but well worth your time.

Such a substantive leadership lesson in itself by Bill Hybels as he explains why Howard Schultz withdrew his commitment as a speaker at the Willow Creek Leadership Summit (held on August 11-12). And furthermore, how he and Willow Creek are responding…

I was particularly convicted and stirred by these  leadership ideas:

Build rather than Burn Bridges

I’m not a huge Howard Schultz fan. Honestly, I’m sure he’s a swell guy but the whole Seattle Sonics fiasco has left me a little very bitter. I would have used the opportunity to subversively question Howard’s character but Bill offers three suggestions to exemplify grace:

  • asks people to contact Howard and Starbucks to invite him back.
  • blesses him by encouraging folks to buy his book.
  • asks people to go buy Starbucks.

Wow. I would have offered some other suggestions that I’m too embarrassed to share on the blog.

Throw stones first. Ask questions later.

Lastly, I resonated with Hybels’ concerns about the growing culture of
“Throw stones first. Ask questions later.” Respect and civility seem to be a growing issue – not just in the public forum of politics but in our broader society – especially as it pertains to our engagement with whom we have disagreements.

  • If you don’t support homosexuality, you’re anti-gay.
  • If you support gay rights, you’re anti-marriage.
  • If you don’t support women in leadership, you’re anti-women.
  • If you support women in leadership, you’re anti-Scriptures.
  • If you don’t support the war in _________, you’re anti-American.
  • If you don’t support Eugene, you’re anti-Eugene.

I want to go on the record and declare that I”m anti anti-________. I’ve neutralized your anti-ness. And I’m brilliant.

Really…We often live as people who are defined by what we are against and not necessarily, what we are for.

Seriously,  it’s hard to love your enemies when you can’t even hear what they’re saying…

Which is another reason why building bridges > burning bridges (a la the video below).

Your turn: What did you think of Hybels’ chat?

Filed under: , , , , , ,

11 Responses

  1. Johnny says:

    Starbucks is as bad as McDonalds for America and the world. I wish more articles would explore how being so overcaffeinated is harmful to our physical health. Pumping your body with caffeine to get you through the day is probably a sign that you need a new job or need some pruning in your life. And it’s weird seeing kids as young as junior high students beginning the coffee habit thanks to the 11,000 plus Starbucks in our country. We need to call out Starbucks more like we do the fast-food chains for the way they’re ruining out bodies.

  2. m says:

    Love Hybel’s response, though I doubt that type of response would’ve saved the sonics from becoming the thunder….
    I would love to be a fly on the wall in the meeting between Hybels and whoever it was that started the online petition. As much as Christians get criticized for judging/condemning homosexuals, it seems like homosexuals do a lot of judging/condemning Christians themselves….

    @Johnny: http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/coffee-new-health-food

  3. jchenwa says:

    I like how he suggests to write to Howard Schultz. Even CEOs have feelings too. And of all people those who understand persecution, those people would be the Jewish people. A little noise by some doesn’t change the great and also beneficial business Mr. Schultz created. At the end of day, we all must be accountable to GOD, our LORD Jesus Christ. Whether we serve Him or not, whether we are favored or not. I can learn from Bill Hybels example of gentle and trusting (in GOD to correct) teaching, correction, or admonishing (take your pick).

  4. Ann F-R says:

    Eugene, thank you for articulating what all of us feel when faced, even indirectly, with criticism, penalties and threats for simply standing with Jesus. We can so naturally move away from Jesus, too, as we’re responding to those fearful responses! Bill Hybels’ gracious & loving care for the person who has been held hostage by those who want to live otherwise exemplifies how all of us are called to follow Christ. Hybels has truly allowed the Good Shepherd to guide his steps.

  5. ycw says:

    Eugene,
    You and Bill seem to be genuine in your desire to show love to others. That is something we can all learn from. My only issue with what Bill said was the thing about scripture defining appropriate sexual behavior within heterosexual marriage only. Is that how we should really understand scripture?
    Anway, keep building bridges our way- I am one person who is trying to build bridges your way too- to reconcile my relationship with Christians and with Christ and hopefully in the process to be a peacemaker in the gay community – I pray that gay people will be encouraged by my words, actions, and attitude to stop throwing stones and start working towards peace and love toward others, even Christians.
    Peace,
    Ycw

  6. uthguy says:

    Change.org (who petitioned Mr. Schultz) started as a great idea I’m sure but like any thing that demands actions it has someones passion behind it. The passion that is driving what is happening now isn’t promoting positive action its bullying the very people it accuses of being bullies. They have petitioned the Texas Rangers to play videos about embracing the gay lifestyle whether or not its their position. Im sure this will be infringing on several players beliefs as they follow the teachings of Jesus also.

  7. Annette says:

    Much as I love and use social media, it’s sad to see how bullies have taken over much of the space. Vitriolic comments posted by anonymous people. Would they do this face to face, I wonder? Starbucks is better than many coffee chains, in that they did a deal with Ethiopian coffee growers a while back, to ensure the producers got a better deal. Like McDonald’s, they provide a lot of jobs for young people, new immigrants, part time workers and the semi-retired. Coffee is good for the brain (drunk in moderation!)

    Bill Hybels was gracious in his response. It was very Christian. My brother (who died in ’09) was gay. He never liked Christians as a result, because he had a hard time from them. He didn’t like my renewed faith, but I always loved him and challenged others’ views of him/homosexuality. Our ‘enemies’ want to make enemies of us, so let’s be especially gracious to them.

  8. Jeff Wilson says:

    What a pansy comment. No wonder people can’t figure out Christianity if this is where our leaders are coming from.

  9. I think we need more people taking this approach to leadership. Well life in general.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Collaboration.

col·lab·o·ra·tion
kəˌlabəˈrāSH(ə)n/
noun

the action of working with someone or a group of others  to produce or create something.

May we hold our logos, egos, and tribalism have their place. May we hold them loosely for they too shall pass. May we collaborate for the sake of the greater Kingdom of God ... which endures forever. As we honor Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., don't forget the God behind the man. The one true God who deposited this dream into MLK is still speaking to us today. Are we listening?

Be courageous. Be brave.

Being invited by the King Family to speak at the MLK worship service at Ebenezer Baptist Church in 2016 remains one of the most unexpected honors of my life. On the right is his daughter, Dr. Bernice King and his sister, Dr. Christine King Farris. Walking throughstreet markets in different parts of the world is the best. Soaking in the culture. Listening to the local language and music. Enjoying the amazing cuisine. Meeting new friends. Praying for the Gospel to penetrate. #ChiangRai Blessed be the local, indigenous leaders for it is they who live in the very communities they seek to love. For it is they who understand their context and culture...better than a Westerner ever will. For it is they who will continue to tenaciously pursue a better world with hope, justice and love when visitors like me leave.

Yes, blessed be the local, indigenous leaders. What an honor and privilege to celebrate with the on-the-ground local @thefreedomstory team to celebrate the recent opening of their Education and Resource Center for the local youth in Chiang Rai, Thailanf. This was made possible through a partnership and matching grant by @onedayswages and The Freedom Story.

While it was an honor to be there to cut the cord and say a few words, this is an example of collaboration. Much love to the Freedom Story team including their co-founders Tawee Donchai and @Rachel Goble, to their staff who live in the community, who understand their context and culture, and who tenaciously pursue a better world with hope, justice and love. And of course, much love to the students themselves for they each matter. Finally, to each person that donated to @onedayswages to make this grant possible.

May hundreds and even thousands of youth be impacted, encouraged, and mentored. May they capture a glimpse of God's love for them.

Photo: @benjaminedwards Part 2 on my wrestling with the complex issue of human trafficking. In part, documenting my trip to Thailand for @onedayswages...to listen, learn, and visit one of our partner orgs @thefreedomstory. More to come.

There's such painful and poignant irony in pursuing justice...unjustly. One way we do this is when we reduce people into projects...and thus, propagating the dangerous power dynamic of US as heroes and THEM as helpless and exclusively as victims. So dangerous.

Human trafficking is not just an issue. It’s ultimately, about people. Depending on the sources of statistics, there are anywhere from 29-40 million people in some form of forced labor and slavery, including sex trafficking.

And one thing I’ve learned, personally, is how easy it is easy to reduce people into projects which is why mutuality, reciprocity, and dignity are so vital. These are critical because God never intended people to be reduced into projects.

We forget this and we indirectly foster a culture and system of victimization or worse, the pornification of the poor or in this case, "the trafficked." And when you start dehumanizing the poor or trafficked, you have no genuine desire to build relationships with them. You believe or build stereotypes in broad strokes, singular, black and white narratives that have been told about them. You believe the lie that they have nothing to teach us and are incapable of contributing to the larger society.

Lord, break our hearts for the things that break your heart. Give us eyes to see others through your eyes. Give us humility so that we acknowledge our own need to learn and grow. (Photo via @thefreedomstory)

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,443,131 hits