Eugene Cho

can i just wear my darn shirt?

How ironic that on the day I was wearing my “Africa” shirt, someone emails me these images. Its’ either amazing timing or someone is a stalker. I’m really hoping it’s the former.

My initial vomitaceous thoughts:

  • Yes, we all care about image.
  • Can I just wear my darn shirt?
  • Everything can be criticized No one and nothing can hide.
  • But cynicism aside, can we try to see the “good”?
  • Are there such things as cynical prophetic voice?

Check out the shirt below. What do you think?

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18 Responses

  1. Ben from TIC says:

    I don’t like altruism being co-opted by Starbucks. Just buy our products and you’ve done your penance. Corporations have adopted charities because it’s good marketing and it makes them look good and green. Regarding t-shirts, there is a sense that it becomes more about fashion than about the cause. I remember I wanted the same doctors without borders t-shirt that Jeff Tweedy wore. At the time, I didn’t know anything about the organization, I just wanted to be cool and be the only other person wearing that shirt besides Jeff. Since then I’ve found causes that are near and dear to my heart to support and I’ve never gotten the t-shirt. But, perhaps the t-shirt incentive was a stepping stone for me to find a charity to support?

  2. mo says:

    Yeah it sucks when corporations like Starbucks get involved in charities, simultaneously raising awareness and generating orders of magnitude more money for the cause. The nerve of those people to co-opt MY charity…

    As for the shirt, whatever man. The only way to fight cynicism is to keep doing what you’re doing. Wear your shirt and wear it proud. I have a “i ❤ NY" shirt, even though I haven't been to NYC in a decade. I still wear it tho. Who? Because I ❤ NYC.

    If you ❤ Africa, wear the shirt. All the naysayers are saying is that they ❤ crapping on other peoples' parades.

  3. Kevin says:

    In terms of the above shirt — worse case scenario is it’s just a clever idea to make a few bucks. I don’t see it becoming a huge fad. Best case scenario it causes those of us who do buy and wear shirts tied to causes to evaluate why we wear them. Are we doing it just to appear a certain way or are we wearing them to sincerely promote the work of an organization, etc.? If it’s for promotional purposes, do we know enough about the organization/cause to share more with people if they ask about our shirt?

    I personally would love to just wear shirts that promote what I believe in. If someone is offended by it, so what. If someone is influenced/inspired by it, how cool is that? Plus, they often do raise money at the same time.

  4. I LOVE THAT SHIRT.

    Yes, I have a big cynical streak, and I also have a near vomitous distaste for what I perceive to be the common thread of socially-acceptable liberal activism in the Pacific NW (really, mostly Portland and Seattle).

    So yes, I think that shirt is awesome.

    Knowing you and knowing some things about ODW, I don’t think you should feel bad wearing a shirt that promotes ODW or World Vision or any charity that is doing great work in Africa, as long as there is a reason why you think that organization is good and/or is doing good work, other than “my roommate told me they’re good” or “I saw somebody at the Genius Bar wearing one.”

  5. Chris says:

    I’ve heard things like this from people before…a lot of it is from To Write Love On Her Arms shirts. They have become the popular “brand” in the music industry and people feel like people wear them to be cool or trendy or to look like they support a good cause but they might not even really know what TWLOHA is about. So the question is all publicity for a company, non-profit, cause, etc good? Sure there are going to be people that wear it for the trend but at least the money they spent on that shirt goes to something good and not just into someones pocket…

  6. Kyle Reed says:

    I think it is a very creative way of making a point.

  7. Miguel says:

    I have my share of thought-provoking, socially conscious t-shirts and I often tread that fine line between wearing the shirt because to advance a message, or wearing the shirt to advance a message about me.

    If I were to be perfectly honest with myself, I’d say it’s almost always both. On one hand, the message will (hopefully) speak for itself. A shirt like this one, in my opinion, is clear. The image of the African continent has somehow become synonymous with poverty and sickness, and hence, need. For better or worse, I believe this to be true. It’s unfortunate and yet still necessary just the same to keep reminding people of where there is need.

    A shirt like “I suck at math” however, might need some more explaining. If I, a Filipino-American man, were to wear it, the context gives it meaning, but it serves the dual purpose of speaking about myself. It says, “Think about this stereotype” and it also says, “Hey, look at me, I’m the kind of Asian guy who wants to defy a stereotype. In fact, label me progressive and conscious, immediately.” (And there’s my streak of cynicism)

    Those are my thoughts…

  8. Yeah, you should be able to wear your darn shirt. The problem isn’t corporations raising awareness, it’s hipster nerds who want to accessorize themselves with some compassion, despite the fact they don’t really care all that much. Most people who wear a Livestrong bracelet have never done a dang thing for cancer, beyond buy a bracelet. If you really devote your time and energies to a cause, you can legitimately wear your t-shirt.

  9. Joshua Daniel Franklin says:

    In the excellent 2007 Vanity Fair issue, Bono mentions “We believed that to ignore the neon and creative force afforded by corporate America would be to ignore the truth about where most Americans live and work . . . we want them to make money for their shareholders because that will make (Red) sustainable.” (search for “bono message 2u” for the article)

  10. David Knapp says:

    If I gave money to a cause in Africa or whatever I wouldn’t want to announce it on my shirt.

    But I think I might wear this shirt.

  11. I wonder if its a temporary backlash against what is true for some. Social justice sounds cool but its a costlier way of life. So if I can get people to think I’m doing it, then I don’t actually have to do anything. I think the shirt is funny.

  12. marissaburt says:

    That shirt made me laugh.

    But that doesn’t mean I’d stop wearing shirts like that – and we all have them. I have a “freeset” bag that I use for a diaper bag, and about 50% of the time I’m okay with that and glad to have purchased something where the proceeds go to something good (offering sex workers alternative employment). I have no idea if anyone actually wonders what freeset is or if they even care. The other 50% of the time, I am a little sheepish about this kind of “branding”. Maybe it is putting too much thought into my image.

    But reality is such that for those of us with the discretionary income to actually own more than two or three shirts, we tend choose them based on some idea of our image, right? It’s kind of the ridiculous piece of our culture – but it’s so ingrained. And it’s evidenced by the fact that we actually have a response to the witty shirt. If I want to overthink it, I’d say I suppose it depends on one’s motives for wearing a shirt. But better to say, hey, if you like a shirt, wear it.

  13. gar says:

    I laughed when I saw the shirt… does that make me cynical?

    I don’t think it’s necessarily bad for people to wear t-shirts that advocate for causes. If anything, at least the t-shirt is being used to promote something worthwhile.

    I do have a problem with people who wear t-shirts adovcating for a cause and these same people have ZERO idea of what it’s about or the organization named. It’d be like a guy wearing a Sonics t-shirt not knowing who Gary Payton is, or someone wearing a Bob Marley t-shirt who can’t hum any of his songs.

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One Day’s Wages

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At times, we have to say ‘NO’ to good things to say ‘YES’ to the most important things.

We can't do it all.
Pray and choose wisely.
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The death toll rises to over 400 and over 7,000 injured in multiple cities and hundreds of villages along the Western border with Iraq.

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It's been a tough, emotional, and painful week - especially as we lament the horrible tragedy of the church shootings at Sutherland Springs. In the midst of this lament, I've been carried by the hope, beauty, and promise of our baptisms last Sunday and the raw and honest testimonies of God's mercy, love, and grace.

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on ourselves 
even as we seek 
to change the world. 
To be about the latter 
without the former 
is the great temptation 
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