Eugene Cho

where do you go to sabbath?

God knew what He was doing by creating and giving humanity the gift of Sabbath. It is an integral part of shalom…

And yet, it’s amazing how difficult it is for us to either ignore it or completely misunderstand it.  I admit that I’m still learning how to relish, rest, and rejoice in this gift.

With that in mind, my family and I took two days to retreat this past weekend. We realized we couldn’t wait till the end of October for our two-week vacation.

If you’re around the Northwest and you’re looking for a great place just for you, your group, your family reunion, a church retreat, or some sort of conference, I really believe that THIS PLACE is one of the most beautiful retreat centers. It’s one of the most beautiful and best run places I’ve been to – and I have been to many places.

So, here’s my question:

Where do you go to rest, retreat, and Sabbath?

I ask this question because for me, I have a hard time to really “sabbath” when I’m in my normal surroundings because it’s easier to focus on the “my” stuff rather than resting in God’s provision and goodness.

Well, I even managed to convince my second daughter to try this thing called “The Blob” and as a result, she learned how to fly…

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9 Responses

  1. Rich Griese says:

    I have za bath right in my house with hot and cold running water. My cat likes to sleep under it in the warm weather. Yeah, it’s one of those old fashioned claw foot types that sits above the floor.

    Cheers! RichGriese@gmail.com

  2. mo says:

    Looks beautiful. So true about not being able to have Sabbath at home. I shouldn’t be like that though, I think. If my life was truly surrounded by God, it wouldn’t be hard to fulfil one of his commandments.

    That being said, my folks live in fairbanks Alaska, which makes a great and gorgeous retreat 🙂

  3. pastoralan says:

    Sabbath is the most ignored, or it’s at least in the top 10, disciplines in the Christian walk. I’m burdened for it for myself and my church.

    I live in Ruidoso, New Mexico. It’s a year round play ground. But it’s also a place where God’s glory is evident in the mountains. So, I’m retreating in place. But my challenge is actually experiencing sabbath.

    Thanks for blogging about it.

  4. Carlos says:

    Our Lady of Guadalupe Trappist Abbey. Lafayette, OR. In silence broken during meals. 3 days over every New Year.

    http://www.trappistabbey.org/Retreats%20files/retreats.html

    just started talking about taking a “break” from technology on Sundays. Yesterday, that meant our 8 year old son isn’t on his DSi, no one is on facebook or surfing, and I’m not on Hulu watching a whole season of . . . (whatever). We sang and laughed on the way to church. Our son read Chronicles 2 and shared his intrigue about kings who did BOTH good and bad. My wife and I talked about how to Sabbath and remembered God and named the good in our lives.

  5. TIC says:

    Chicago is a tough place to Sabbath. The urban sprawl here is horrendous. I usually take a long bike ride without music or anything on the green bay trail, which heads north from Chicago through Evanston and far beyond. A little fresh air, exercise, sunshine, prairie flowers, and meditation on the sermon doeth the soul like good medicine.

  6. Jennifer says:

    Your comment about not being able to sabbath at home made me curious. How are you defining sabbath? In the original context, sabbath was done right at home, among a persons stuff, and that was part of the point – learning to be content without striving about stuff. So, I’m curious if you really mean “vacation”? Nothing wrong with vacation, but slightly different than sabbath.

    • Eugene Cho says:

      Jennifer – You’re right about what it was intended for. It’s tough to take a “day” to do those very things in the midst of my stuff because it’s easy to have the day become a day about me – my wants, my work, my emails, my chores, my stuff…

      So, even if it’s not a vacation, I have found taking a few hours away to be rest and rejoice in the Lord to be helpful when I return to be amidst my stuff.

  7. chad m says:

    cascades camp. yes! love the pics and love that you can get away there. we’re trying to build something like that into our family schedule this year as well man. hopefully i’ll have something positive to share after our getaway next week!

  8. .elise.anne. says:

    from my home in MN, i went to seattle & vancouver for my sabbath vacation rest this year (last week), and worshipped with this awesome community called quest church … 🙂

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One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Father, please bless and protect these Iraqi and Syrian "refugee" children that have already endured so much. Protect their hearts and mind from unfathomable trauma. Plant seeds of hope and vision in their lives. And as we pray for them, teach us how to advocate for them. Amen. "We don't call them refugees. We call them relatives. We don't call them camps but centers. Dignity is so important." -  local Iraqi priest whose church has welcomed many "relatives" to their church's property

It's always a privilege to be invited into peoples' home for tea - even if it's a temporary tent. This is an extended Yezidi family that fled the Mosul, Iraq area because of ISIS. It's indeed true that Christians were targeted by ISIS and thatbstory muat be shared but other minority groups like the Yezidis were also targeted. Some of their heartbreaking stories included the kidnapping of their sister. They shared that their father passed away shortly of a "broken heart." The conversation was emotional but afterwards, we asked each other for permission to take photos. Once the selfies came out, the real smiles came out.

So friends: Pray for Iraq. Pray for the persecuted Church. Pray for Christians, minority groups like the Yezidis who fear they will e completely wiped out in the Middle East,, and Muslims alike who are all suffering under ISIS. Friends: I'm traveling in the Middle East this week - Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. (Make sure you follow my pics/stories on IG stories). Specifically, I'm here representing @onedayswages to meet, learn, and listen to pastors, local leaders, NGOs, and of course directly from refugees from within these countries - including many from Syria.

For security purposes, I haven't been able to share at all but I'm now able to start sharing some photos and stories. For now, I'll be sharing numerous photos through my IG stories and will be sharing some longer written pieces in couple months when ODW launches another wave of partnerships to come alongside refugees in these areas. Four of us are traveling together also for the purpose of creating a short documentary that we hope to release early next year.

While I'm on my church sabbatical, it's truly a privilege to be able to come to these countries and to meet local pastors and indigenous leaders that tirelessly pursue peace and justice, and to hear directly from refugees. I've read so many various articles and pieces over the years and I thought I was prepared but it has been jarring, heartbreaking,  and gut wrenching. In the midst of such chaos, there's hope but there's also a lot of questions, too.

I hope you follow along as I share photos, stories, and help release this mini-documentary. Please tag friends that might be interested.

Please pray for safety, for empathy, for humility and integrity, for divine meetings. Pray that we listen well; To be present and not just be a consumer of these vulnerable stories. That's my biggest prayer.

Special thanks to @worldvisionusa and @worldrelief for hosting us on this journey. 9/11
Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.

Today, I had some gut wrenching and heart breaking conversations about war, violence, and peacemaking. Mostly, I listened. Never in my wildest imagination did I envision having these conversations on 9/11 of all days. I wish I could share more now but I hope to later after I process them for a few days.

But indeed: Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.
May it be so. Amen. Mount Rainier is simply epic. There's nothing like flying in and out of Seattle.

#mountrainier
#seattle
#northwestisbest Took a train to Busan. Did not encounter any zombies but I was ready just in case.

Busan. First visit to this city (couple weeks ago) and was blown away by its beauty. Also, shocked that it has become the fifth largest containment port city in the world. That's a lot of import and export.

#MyAttemptToBeTheBestSmartphonePhotographer 
#Pusan #SouthKorea

my tweets

  • Don't underestimate what God can do through you. God has a very long history of using foolish and broken people for His purposes and glory. || 22 hours ago
  • Father, bless these Iraqi and Syrian refugee children that have already endured so much. As we pray, teach us how t… twitter.com/i/web/status/9… || 2 days ago
  • Pray for Iraq. Pray for persecuted Church, minority groups (Yezidis) and Muslims alike who are suffering under ISIS: instagram.com/p/BZF2j6Ngrna/ || 2 days ago
  • "We don't call them refugees. We call them relatives. We don't call them camps but centers. Dignity is so important." - a local Iraqi priest || 3 days ago
  • I've been traveling through Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan. Meeting local pastors/leaders, NGOs, and refugees. Join us on IG… twitter.com/i/web/status/9… || 3 days ago
  • Seeking justice is part of our discipleship. In other words, seek justice not just to change the world...but to be changed more like Christ. || 6 days ago