Eugene Cho

i am a pharisee

Don’t read the full post yet. First, take look at the above piece of art and share your thoughts:

  • What do you see?
  • How do you interpret this art?
  • How do you feel about this?

For me (as a “minister”), it is sobering to consider how we as “professional clergy” might – for various reasons – may have missed important aspects of what Christ desires us to see, know, and experience.  I look at the art and wonder, “Are we the blind leading the seeking?”

The turning point for me came through an epiphany couple years ago.

I’ve come to realize – not in a self-deprecating way – that as much as I have tried NOT to be…

I AM a Pharisee.

The difference – from moi – and from the Pharisees of the Scriptures – is that I acknowledge and celebrate my need for Jesus and to be regularly informed and transformed by not only the Scriptures, traditions, but the living presence and power of Triune God: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.

Ultimately, it leads me to be a worshipper of the Triune God.

Yet, as much as I seek to avoid the common traps, it’s so easy to gravitate towards laws, bylaws, rules, behavior, buildings, money, personal fame, and the like. This is why I read this often:

to remind myself that God is actually talking to ME even though I’d like to often think it’s about YOU.

And this is why I choose to live by Grace.

Because any other path will lead us away from the personal Truth of Christ.

Share/Bookmark

Artist: Michael Belk

Artist description:

By the time Jesus began his ministry in the early days of the First Century, the Pharisees, who were the religious elite of that time, had interpreted the Jewish law by adding many of their own rules. There were so many do’s and don’ts that religious life had become a burden to the Jewish people.

There are many in our religious communities, like the Pharisees of old, who have allowed the process of religion to overcome the purpose of Christ. Jesus referred to these people as the “blind leading the blind” and said they would “fall into a ditch.”

In all aspect of life, but especially in knowing the truth of God, its our responsibility to sift through the clutter of religious practices that may be getting in the way of seeking a relationship with Christ.

After all, Jesus did not come to start a religion; He came to testify to the truth of God and offer a revolutionary new way of living out God’s plan.

Filed under: , , , , ,

16 Responses

  1. your friend says:

    I immediately noticed how neat and clean the pharisees were and Jesus clothes showed his active work among people, a man who gets his hands dirty during practical ministry.

    There was a hint of hierachy in the picture, except the child and Jesus.

    I also noticed the innocence of the child, who looked up the his elders, and I pondered upon the awesome responsibility we have as we are examples, we ALWAYS model SOMETHING to kids, good or bad.

    I was especially impressed by the artist how he managed to portray Jesus’ face and statue as non-condemnational! This is a picture of Jesus expressing GRACE. Beautiful.

  2. Chris says:

    Hey Eugene,

    Great post! Just wanted to let you know that the link towards the bottom of the post is broken.

  3. TIC says:

    When I realized that I was a Pharisee a great book came my way about grace: Grace in Practice by Paul Zahl. One could call him a grace extremist. We need to be grace extremists since our proclivities toward Law are so strong.

  4. Deb says:

    Besides the look of innocence of the child as well as his look of seeming to be asking for something, anything, from the adults in the picture, I am struck too by how similar his appearance is to Jesus, in contrast to the other people. Am I looking to Jesus, as my example? Is that my desire, to look like Him? And to look past all the “noise” around me, to see His truth and follow Him?

  5. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Eugene Cho. Eugene Cho said: The turning point in my life was coming to terms that I AM A PHARISEE: http://bit.ly/9vbi9Z […]

  6. Steven Kim says:

    I see and appreciate where you are going with this, but is the term “Pharisee” the right word? Are you, or were you an “Offspring of Vipers”, as John the Baptist put it?

    I think we need to be careful as to not paint the clergy (since you are one and are being self-deprecating, IMO) as being the pharisees of today – your view can easily color the good character of many clergy and stigmatizes the learned clergy. I come from the Charles and John Wesley tradition 🙂

  7. jchenwa says:

    Just my thoughts, in Luke 12, the yeast of the Pharisees is hypocrisy. Jesus is shown as a regular guy in the art, yet He was the purest of the pure, the Lamb of GOD. Although we are children of GOD, we still make mistakes, we are all hypocrites. We’re no better than the non-believer, yet some among us roll holy. I’m a Pharisee sometimes too.

  8. nadine.w says:

    Good stuff! Definitely processing it and asking God to show me how this applies to me…

  9. Following directions and looking at the picture first, it makes me feel disappointed. It’s like we adults are walking the wrong direction down a hallway, dragging the kid behind us who see’s the direction we should go. Jesus is even standing there looking at us like, “guys, I’m over here. Come this way”, instead, we’re literally blindly following a book that we ironically can’t read because of our blindfolds.

    Powerful image.

  10. matt says:

    I guess when I look at this I wonder if Jesus meant to come and re-establish a new clergy/laity system at all or if he had a more radical idea and we keep falling into the same old patterns.

    You will be for me a kingdom of priests…not a kingdom with priests. Ex 19-6

  11. Larry says:

    I get the point of the piece. Certainly leaders of God’s people in every age can be the blind leading the blind. Yet the piece in choosing to represent leaders only in traditional liturgical garb, exempts the pastor in the business suit or casual garb. I see a not so subtle polemic against Reformed and Catholic leadership. Not saying they should be exempt but what the image is trying to convey isn’t about a particular form of faith but the human condition when it gains leadership. Like much of this artists work it is heavy handed in ways that I think distorts the truth the artist wishes to portray.

  12. Larry says:

    The artist and we also forget that while the negative connotation of “Pharisee” as a certain accuracy, Jesus was himself of the pharisee “sect” grouping, “denomination” within 1st century Judaism.
    We are all pharisees, the sooner all Christians realize that the better. You don’t have to fall into blatant hypocrisy to be a “pharisee”, the Pharisee’s were trying to restore and rehabilitate the people of God who had fallen away from the Torah. If God’s plan hadn’t been for the incarnation and Jesus Christ being the Torah and fulfilling the Torah, the Pharisees would have been correct. And not all of them were the Blind leading the blind.

  13. stephen says:

    Hey Eugene! Thanks for this post! it’s so easy as a pastor to point the finger at people playing Pharisee, who judge movements of the Spirit as risky or persecute ministry peeps who are following where they believe Christ leads them. Just had a conversation last week with a guy who plainly defended actions against a minister who was “eating with sinners…” My conclusion? He’s a Pharisee! But your conclusion came at a great time, preventing me to the same kind of dumb judgmentalism – instead, the conversation will continue in humility!
    Thanks for your transparency, let the reconciliation continue~

  14. As a pastor, i am by definition a walking target and subject to corruption. Powerful piece of art, it depicts at a glance what we would write papers about. This is why creativity is increasingly present in the western church. We should nurture it and walking as the child in the picture we can look at Jesus with seeing eyes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

"He must become greater; I must become less." - John 3:30 We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

Be faithful.

PS: Also, it helps to get some Vitamin D especially if you live in the rainy Northwest Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on.

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,460,851 hits