Eugene Cho

the haiti jump rope champion

One of the highlights of my time in Haiti was meeting many kids during our brief trip. There’s something about kids that are so very inspiring, uplifting, and even heartbreaking. We heard some painful stories about the suffering of kids – as a result of the earthquake but even before the quake – but one of the things that most encouraged me was the sense of “hope” I saw in the faces of the kids.

I had the joy of getting into a jump rope competition and yes, I should have let the kids win but being the competitive guy that I am, I sucked in the pain of my both of my Achilles tendons and was declared the Haiti jump rope champion. Check out the jump rope video below and sadly, the stark statistics impacting the current and future generations of Haiti.

Let’s do our small part to work a  more beautiful, just, kind, and compassionate world. Still doing some research about how we can participate in the “next steps” in helping Haitians rebuild their country.

Consider some of the these statistics impacting the children of Haiti:

  • Gross national income per capita is US$520, about half the total for Nicaragua, the second poorest country in the Americas
  • 78% of Haitians are poor (less than US$2 a day), and more than half (54%) live in extreme poverty (less than US$1 a day).
  • In rural areas, poverty and extreme poverty rates are estimated to be 84% and 69% respectively.
  • Over two-thirds of the labor force do not have formal jobs.
  • Half of children under 5 are malnourished.
  • Over 7% of children die at birth.
  • For every 100,000 births, 523 women died in Haiti, compared to eight maternal deaths for every 100,000 births in Europe.
  • 80 out of 1,000 Haitian children never see their first birthday.
  • 50% of primary school age children are not enrolled in school.
  • One-third of girls over six never go to school.
  • Approximately 30% of children attending primary school will not make it to third grade; 60% will abandon school before sixth grade.

Filed under: ,

8 Responses

  1. Steve says:

    It is amazing how resilient children are. Your post is a timely reminder of the need to pray for Haiti and to continue to look for ways to help.

  2. Derek Sciba says:

    You have got some mad skills, Eugene. Even turning along with your jump rope partner. A good reminder of the people we’re trying to look out for in Haiti.

  3. danderson says:

    I’ve been down to Guatemala twice in the last four years. We took down jump ropes both times. It’s a great ice breaker and community building activity and a way to cross cultures.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

This was 10 years ago. I dominated my son in wrestling and I know what you're thinking, "How could you employ a rear chokehold armbar kimura on your own son?" Hey, a competition is a competition.

I love you, son. The world is broken. This ia a sad truth. But the story of redemption is not yet finished. God is not yet done. This is the ultimate Truth. Have hope. Press on. Ten years ago, I witnessed one of those "God things" when a church called Interbay Covenant Church gave itself, its legacy, and a building property worth $7 million dollars to @seattlequest. We were then only 5 years old.

Quest is an urban, multiethnic churchplant that started in 2001. We rented the facilities at Interbay Covenant Church - a predominantly older, mostly Anglo congregation with a rich 65 years history. After some time, Pastor Ray Bartel (senior pastor, Interbay) approached me with a "crazy idea" of Interbay "dying to itself and giving itself to Quest" for the sake of the greater Kingdom and the coming generations.

This eventually led to three years of many conversations and prayers. On June 3, 2007, the two churches officially came together to become one church. In giving itself, Interbay also shared their leadership, legacy, and stories. They also gave all of their assets without any strings and without any debt.

Their radical generosity and courage is what enabled Quest to grow - not just numerically - but deeper in discipleship, and deeper in missions - to the city of Seattle and beyond. On the occasion of the 10th anniversary of this merger, we created a short film (check my FB page to see the video) to tell the story - so that our church and the next generations may never forget and that the larger Church may be stirred and encouraged by a greater Kingdom vision.

Thank you, Interbay! The NBA season is over but the hustle and grind continues for my daughter. We argue sometimes but I love training my daughter. She's working hard for her senior year next year. Starting point guard. She's improved a lot. She's one of the quickest players on the floor and has a great midrange jumper. But trying to get her to keep working on her handles, using her off hand and shoulder to protect the ball,  staying and dribbling the ball lower to the ground, and playing aggressive and downhill while remaining in control. That's what we're working on this week. #hoopdreams #ChovarBall Reunited with my favorite elephant, Buh'loom. We bonded earlier this year and I'd like to think that she recognized my voice. Also, appreciate learning about ethical and sustainable eco-tourism. Anywhere. Everywhere. Night markets are the best.

my tweets