Eugene Cho

stories of haiti: collective grief and hope

I was intending to blog more during my time here in Haiti but to be honest, I’m having information and emotional overload. I’m just taking everything in as I listen to people, drive around, meet relief workers, spending the nights on the roof and soaking in the sounds of the neighborhood, and hear the numerous stories of the Haitians we’re meeting.

There are so many stories from Haiti – a collective grief and hope.

Here’s one story from a gentleman named James who is working as a translator for World Concern. I’ve really enjoyed meeting him and hearing a glimpse of his story.

James is fortunate to be alive. On the day of the earthquake, he was late for his university classes and thus, he was not in his university when the building collapsed during the quake. Unfortunately, many including his teachers, classmates, and his mother did not survive the quake.

Hear his story and consider his words:

“The real work starts now…”

We can’t do that work for Haiti or for James. They have to do that work but the question is, “How can we come alongside our Haitian brothers and sisters?”

Filed under: , , ,

7 Responses

  1. goldfearsnofire says:

    thanks for the update eugene. it is a good thing to hear personal stories. the people of haiti remain in our thoughts and prayers. i see you fulfilling the words of james 1:26-27, and know that you are bringing hope, inspiration, and encouragement to many in haiti and back at home. thank you eugene!

  2. Becky says:

    Wow, what a compelling video. It’s so hard to imagine how many others there have stories like James… losing friends and family members. Though it becomes easy for us to forget this tragedy happened and move on, it’s videos like this that remind us how the real work is yet to come. Thanks for sharing PE!

  3. […] EVERYONE was impacted by the earthquake. You can sense that there is a collective grief and a desire for a collective hope. Over couple days, we interviewed 8 random women and 5 of them had lost at least one of their […]

  4. […] EVERYONE was impacted by the earthquake. You can sense that there is a collective grief and a desire for a collective hope. Over couple days, we interviewed 8 random women and 5 of them had lost at least one of their […]

  5. […] Humanitarian:  I like my friend’s take on what’s going on in Haiti.  What are your […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Made it to 47 years old this psst week. Grateful for God's grace and all those who believed in me, prayed for me, encouraged me, invested in me, forgave me, fed me, loved me, and _____ me.

I've come a long way since my first school picture  at the age of 6 - the age I immigrated to the United States. And long way to go. You can do it, sun. Break through the clouds. I love her. Saturday morning date at Pike Market with @minheejcho. Enjoying the final day of sun before 6 months of rain and gray. Not lol'ing. Some of my moat memorable travels have been to Myanmar (otherwise known as Burma). In fact, the vision of @onedayswages began on my first visit to this country in 2006. On a recent visit, I began learning about the Rohingya people. Sadly, it has escalated to horrendous, genocidal proportions.

Thus far, about 500,000 people have been driven out from Myanmar through violence...with most going to Bangledesh...regulated to a massive refugee camp. Stateless. Undocumented. Minority groups. Dehumanized. Homes and villages destroyed. And so much more unspeakable atrocities.

Yes, it's complex and messy. It always is. But the root of this injustice as the case for so much brokeness in the world is the sin of dehumanizing one anotber as..."the other." May we see each person, including the Rohingya people, as one who is created in the image of God. It's the truth and the remedy to the incessant dehumanization that goes on in our world.

Lord, in your mercy. The obedience of discipleship which includes the work of justice is a marathon. It's long, arduous, and emotional. Be tenacious. But also take care of yourself. Create healthy rhythms. Don't burn out. We need you for the marathon. Friends, don't give up. Press on. In the midst of so much chaos in the world, may we continue to cling to the hope of the whole Gospel. May we cling unto Jesus:

Way maker!
Miracle worker!
Promise keeper!
Light in the darkness!
That is who You are!

What an encounter with the Holy Spirit at @seattlequest today. Grateful for our worship team, the gospel choir, and the Audio/Visual team. Thank you Matt, Teresita, and Chris. Please thank all the volunteers for us.

my tweets