Eugene Cho

an interesting visual guide to “charity”

This is a fascinating graph and analysis of “giving” from Mint. If you haven’t seen it, take a few moments to study . Would love to read your thoughts and observations. And in case you were looking for venues to donate, One Day’s Wages has a Haiti Relief and Rebuild Fund. We’re raising $100K to our partner orgs and all of it (mins c.c. costs) go directly to the efforts.

Americans lead the world in charitable contributions, giving $300 billion a year to charities. Sounds like a lot right? But this is just a drop in the bucket compared to the over One Trillion Dollars needed to keep US charities in operation, more than the US government collects in taxes. The rest comes from their own assets, government support, and foreign investment. Our visual guide to giving shows who’s paying and offers some tips on how to pick a charity of your own.

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11 Responses

  1. […] by Don Bryant on January 19, 2010 Thanks to Eugene Cho for posting this. Look it over and […]

  2. Don Bryant says:

    Thanks for the post. I used the graph on my blog with thanks and a link to you.

  3. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Sinbad J, sponso RING. sponso RING said: an interesting visual guide to “charity” « eugene cho: an interesting visual guide to “charity”. This is a fascina… http://bit.ly/6PVY64 […]

  4. mrwcase says:

    “When calculated as a percentage of income, the neediest become the most charitable.”

    Dang…sounds like, “Calling his disciples to him, Jesus said, ‘I tell you the truth, this poor widow has put more into the treasury than all the others.'” -Mark 12:43

    This Mint analysis is perfect timing for people who are considering ways to support the Haiti relief.

    A question that has been on my mind over the last view weeks and is posed to anyone wiling to honestly respond:

    DO YOU EVER GIVE YOUR TITHE OR CHARITY DONATION AND SECRETLY EXPECT GOD TO BLESS YOUR LIFE IN RETURN? (maybe you don’t expect anything when you give, but in retrospect perhaps)

  5. joshuadf says:

    The issues go right along with your post on the $130m First Baptist Church of Dallas building project, Eugene. The above graph makes the Gates Foundation (not named, but it’s the Warren Buffet one) which funds non-profit global heath sound suspicious as an “own charity”, while religious contributions are lumped together whether they’re for a food bank–or fancy building with lots of parking for BMWs. We Americans may give more to charities, but often these charities are serving us through church buildings and programs. Meanwhile the US government spends a smaller percentage of its budget on aid than any other developed country. It’s a messy business figuring out who is giving.

  6. Cliff Holmes says:

    This is interesting stuff. I didn’t know that it cost that much money to keep the U.S. charities going.

    Is it possible that we have too many charities in the United States. Would we all be better served if there were fewer charities each receiving more money?

  7. […] Tagged charity, compassion, eugene cho, faith, giving, mint.com An interesting visual guide to ‘giving,’ thanks to Mint.com and Eugene Cho. […]

  8. Rick in Texas says:

    Couple Comments:
    “$300 billion a year to charities. Sounds like a lot right? But this is just a drop in the bucket compared to the over One Trillion Dollars needed…” 300B is almost a third of 1B isn’t it? A third of a bucket is one big “drop”

    “…needed to keep US charities in operation…” misses the point. The goal is not to keep US charities in operation; the goal is the progressive accomplishment of worthy goals. In the case of my donation to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, for example, the goal is to put the JDRF out of business by virtue of finding a cure – and everyone employed at JDRF knows it.

    • Andy M says:

      I wouldn’t necessarily say it misses the point, because it is a relevant question to ask how an organization uses it’s money. The question I want to know when I’m making a donation is how much of my money will actually be used for whatever goal it is that I’m giving it for?

      If an organization uses a majority of it’s resources for things such as administration costs and fundraising, then it is no longer focused on the goal it began with, but rather is focused on sustaining a business. The goal has taken a back seat to keeping the organization alive.

      I was a part of a church plant where by the time we left it, it was spending roughly 90% of it’s money on rent and utilities. The rest went to the pastor. There was no money left to spend on helping the poor or starting programs to help people or build community. That is misplaced priorities in my opinion.

      JDRF may not be like that, but I would bet that many organizations are more worried about keeping their organization alive than completing their original goals.

  9. Rick in Texas says:

    …oops … third line, “1B” should read “1T”

  10. […] to Eugene Cho for this. It could have been part of FRL tomorrow, but I wanted to make sure no on skipped it. Very […]

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One Day’s Wages

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Our character is often evident in our highs and lows. Be humble in the mountaintops. Be steadfast in the valleys. Be faithful in the between. Quintessential Seattle summer night... Exciting news! While I can't share the specifics yet, Jeremy Lin (@jlin7) and @onedayswages will be partnering together. 
About a year ago, Jeremy reached out after he read my book, Overrated. We talked about, faith, gospel, justice, tenacity, influence, breaking ankles with our crossovers. Eventually, one thing led to another and then dreaming about collaboration for the greater Kingdom.

I appreciate his heart, his humility, and his commitment to use his platform for Christ. And of course, I'm thrilled for his new chapter as the starting point guard for the Brooklyn Nets. He's gonna have a great season. #jeremylin #linsanity #onedayswages #nba #brooklynnets // photo credit: @lovitylove I was trying to have a tender father-daughter grown up talk moment before she heads off to college next month. As in like, "Hey, you're a grown up now, floss regularly,  know who you are, what you're about, study hard, don't succumb to peer pressure, your relationship with God is the first priority, don't take too many selfies, know the difference between "their', 'there', and they're', watch out for boys and their cooties"... but...I'm having a difficult...time...focusing. This fall, I'm marking 25 years of serving as a pastor in the local church. Served in Sacramento, CA, Flushing NY, Princeton, NJ, Seoul, Korea, Lynnwood, WA, and now about 17 years in the city of Seattle. Minhee has been on this journey with me for almost 20 years. 
So many ups and downs. Lots of tears and restless nights. Lots of personal doubts and insecurities. But ultimately, we've experienced that God's grace is sufficient in our weakness. 
And along the way, so many incredible and indelible memories. 
Especially grateful to be invited into the joyous celebrations and also the deep moments of vulnerability and pain. Through it all, what an amazing joy and privilege to bear witness to the grace and love of Christ. Palm trees make everything feel better. Thank you to the kind folks of Mount Hermon for hosting us. Thank you, Santa Cruz for being Santa Cruz.

my tweets

  • The foundation of humility is when we see ourselves in the right relationship with God. In other words: God is God and we are not. || 2 days ago
  • RT @EugeneCho: We confess: Our mourning is often limited to the West. Lord, forgive us. Break our hearts. Awake us from our apathy. https:/… || 3 days ago
  • We confess: Our mourning is often limited to the West. Lord, forgive us. Break our hearts. Awake us from our apathy. twitter.com/kenanrahmani/s… || 3 days ago
  • Our character is often evident in our highs and lows. Be humble in the mountaintops. Be… instagram.com/p/BJjHqsKhZl1/ || 4 days ago
  • Our character is often evident in our highs and lows.Be humble in the mountaintops. Be steadfast in the valleys. Be faithful in the between. || 4 days ago
  • RT @NMocanu: @EugeneCho Mia cara amata bella Italia... stiamo pregando per te! Translated: My beautiful beloved Italy, I am praying for y… || 4 days ago

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