Eugene Cho

why i choose, at times, to be an angry asian man

laundryWe often speak of ‘loving our neighbors’ but it’s really hard when we don’t even know our neighbors. I see this to be a growing problem – not just in the [C]hurch but our larger society. Why is it so hard to meet and grow with our neighbors?

And how about those who are the “others” in our society? When we’re unable to learn and hear (even for a glimpse) the stories of others who are suffering or enduring through some form of injustice, they only become issues, statistics, and whatever other words we tend to use.

I share this not to incite empathy for issues of racialization but in order to come to a deeper understanding, we really need to hear one another’s stories and collectively, sing the song that God showers over us: “You are created in the image of God”

Watch this clip from last Sunday’s sermon. Two important points & stories: one of a humbling chat with a “I’m a dark skinned African-American brother…”and why I choose to be at times, ‘an angry Asian man’.”

“Two Wongs Make it White”…still ain’t funny.

For those are viewing this via RSS, click here.  To see the full sermon: here.

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13 Responses

  1. Joy says:

    Thought I would give your readers a chance to take action. The Onion is selling a shirt with this on the front “My friend went to Thailand and all I got was this lousy prostitute.” I would just encourage everyone out there to email the Onion and let them know of your outrage. It’s not okay to de-humanize those who can’t even speak up for themselves.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. […] Eugene Cho, angry Asian man Go read/watch/listen to Eugene Cho’s latest, please. […]

  3. […] Angry Asian man Go read/watch/listen to Eugene Cho’s latest, please. […]

  4. LK says:

    Joy–that is downright cruel. thanks so much for the heads up.

  5. Craig says:

    That bus seat story used to happen to me every day in Japan. Sometimes pre-socialization-aged kids would sit down next to me and their mothers would tell them (in Japanese, assuming I didn’t understand) to get up and not sit next to me because I was dangerous or strange or foreign.

  6. Tony says:

    I was actually confused a bit on Sunday when you told the bus story. I thought you were talking about me since I have experienced that exact thing probably hundreds of times (I’ve been catching the city bus since 6th grade). But I didn’t remember ever telling you about my experience. But when you described the way that the guy told you about his story, I knew it wasn’t me.

    I bet if you got a room full of black men who catch the bus regularly and asked them if they can relate to that story (or similar stories, such as being followed around in stores) I bet almost every single one could relate. Even in “progressive” Seattle.

    @Joy: wow, really?!? The Onion is usually so sharp! This sounds like a huge misstep.

  7. Wayne Park says:

    firstly congrats on launching ODW PE…

    second – being an “angry asian man” is that thing which offsets stereotypes of compliant passive asian men.

    Thank God for your example to me and others to be righteously – yet peaceably – angry.

  8. This is nothing new. In the years approx. 1978 to 1981, Christian singer Keith Green would ask his audiences how many could name the people who live on either side of their house or apartment.

    Very, very few. Can we really love our neighbors if we don’t know them; or don’t even know who they are?

  9. gar says:

    Speaking of things that make me an AngryAsianMan… Halloween is right around the corner:

    http://www.angryasianman.com/2009/10/bad-halloween-costumes-2009.html

    aiyah. (or for my Korean homies… aigoo).

  10. Julie says:

    The bus I understand. That’s the way America has always been – and most “progressives” are still the same way.

    The Church is what gets me though. When the bench near you in church is always empty. Or people bound up to similar-skinned visitors and yet somehow “don’t notice” you.

  11. seonghuhn says:

    I hate that t-shirt.
    Thanks for speaking out, enjoyed the sermon clip.

  12. […] we don’t shout and at times, be an angry asian man…who will? Remember the Abercrombie & Fitch campaign featuring the infamous Two Wongs can […]

  13. […] we don’t shout and at times, be an angry asian man, who will? Remember the Abercrombie & Fitch campaign featuring the infamous Two Wongs can make […]

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One Day’s Wages

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Window seat. For the win. As leaders, we must not see ministry and family as competing commitments.  We must not sacrifice our marriage and kids for the sake of "ministry." How can we? Loving our families IS ministry & good leadership.

And on a side note, we took this goofy photo for Mother's Day last Sunday at @seattlequest. I was shocked! What in the world happened to our kids? Our 13 year old son blocked four of my shots on the basketball court yesterday. He's since been grounded... I fear that we ask God to move mountains, forgetting that God also wants to move us.

In fact, it's possible that we are that mountain. Time flies. The eldest is wrapping up her 1st year in college and the college tours have begun for the 2nd child. The youngest enters high school in the Fall. Can't say enough about how proud Minhee and I are of the kids - not just of their accomplishments but the people they are and are becoming.

But...man...we can't wait to party it up when we're emptynesters. Party at our house. It's going to be epic. Humbled. Grateful. Mindful of God's grace and faithfulness in my life. It's all grace... It's an unexpected honor to be invited back - even with some mini-drama - to @princetonseminary to receive the 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award - exactly 25 years after starting my journey there as a student in 1992. Wow.

Princeton isn't necessarily for everyone. And to say that I loved everything about my experience would be misleading but it was very formative. Ir challenged me to examine why I believed in what I believed. It reminded me that God could handle my questions. It prepared me for a post-Christian context where I am not entitled to be heard but I had to earn the right to be heard, and of course, it taught me that all is good with a Philly cheese steak at Hoagie Haven.

No one is an island to themselves and I am certainly an example of that. Many people - women and men, young and old, and of many backgrounds - prayed, encouraged, mentored, and loved me along the way. Grateful for my professors at seminary, my many classmates, and the numerous fellow staff and co-laborers I've had the privilege of serving Christ with past and present. And of course, I'm forever inspired by my parents, my children, and my wife, Minhee. Thank you for your faith, hope, and love...and oh, for your patience. Only your family will know and see both the best and worst of you. They've seen my worst...and keep on believing in me.

Thank you again, PTS and President Barnes, for this honor. Then, today, and tomorrow...by God's grace, just striving to be faithful to my Lord and Savior...to preach and live out the convictions of the whole Gospel. Amen. So humbled and grateful to be with @catalystleader in Cincinnati to encourage leaders from all around the country about the invitation to Uncommon Fellowship.

Preached from John 4. We can talk, preach, sing, philsophize, liturgize, and spit rhymes about Samaria...but we still have to talk through Samaria.

my tweets

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  • As leaders, we must not sacrifice our family for the sake of ministry because loving our family IS good leadership: instagram.com/p/BUVAGVwg-5z/ || 2 days ago
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