Eugene Cho

why i choose, at times, to be an angry asian man

laundryWe often speak of ‘loving our neighbors’ but it’s really hard when we don’t even know our neighbors. I see this to be a growing problem – not just in the [C]hurch but our larger society. Why is it so hard to meet and grow with our neighbors?

And how about those who are the “others” in our society? When we’re unable to learn and hear (even for a glimpse) the stories of others who are suffering or enduring through some form of injustice, they only become issues, statistics, and whatever other words we tend to use.

I share this not to incite empathy for issues of racialization but in order to come to a deeper understanding, we really need to hear one another’s stories and collectively, sing the song that God showers over us: “You are created in the image of God”

Watch this clip from last Sunday’s sermon. Two important points & stories: one of a humbling chat with a “I’m a dark skinned African-American brother…”and why I choose to be at times, ‘an angry Asian man’.”

“Two Wongs Make it White”…still ain’t funny.

For those are viewing this via RSS, click here.  To see the full sermon: here.

Filed under:

13 Responses

  1. Joy says:

    Thought I would give your readers a chance to take action. The Onion is selling a shirt with this on the front “My friend went to Thailand and all I got was this lousy prostitute.” I would just encourage everyone out there to email the Onion and let them know of your outrage. It’s not okay to de-humanize those who can’t even speak up for themselves.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. […] Eugene Cho, angry Asian man Go read/watch/listen to Eugene Cho’s latest, please. […]

  3. […] Angry Asian man Go read/watch/listen to Eugene Cho’s latest, please. […]

  4. LK says:

    Joy–that is downright cruel. thanks so much for the heads up.

  5. Craig says:

    That bus seat story used to happen to me every day in Japan. Sometimes pre-socialization-aged kids would sit down next to me and their mothers would tell them (in Japanese, assuming I didn’t understand) to get up and not sit next to me because I was dangerous or strange or foreign.

  6. Tony says:

    I was actually confused a bit on Sunday when you told the bus story. I thought you were talking about me since I have experienced that exact thing probably hundreds of times (I’ve been catching the city bus since 6th grade). But I didn’t remember ever telling you about my experience. But when you described the way that the guy told you about his story, I knew it wasn’t me.

    I bet if you got a room full of black men who catch the bus regularly and asked them if they can relate to that story (or similar stories, such as being followed around in stores) I bet almost every single one could relate. Even in “progressive” Seattle.

    @Joy: wow, really?!? The Onion is usually so sharp! This sounds like a huge misstep.

  7. Wayne Park says:

    firstly congrats on launching ODW PE…

    second – being an “angry asian man” is that thing which offsets stereotypes of compliant passive asian men.

    Thank God for your example to me and others to be righteously – yet peaceably – angry.

  8. This is nothing new. In the years approx. 1978 to 1981, Christian singer Keith Green would ask his audiences how many could name the people who live on either side of their house or apartment.

    Very, very few. Can we really love our neighbors if we don’t know them; or don’t even know who they are?

  9. gar says:

    Speaking of things that make me an AngryAsianMan… Halloween is right around the corner:

    http://www.angryasianman.com/2009/10/bad-halloween-costumes-2009.html

    aiyah. (or for my Korean homies… aigoo).

  10. Julie says:

    The bus I understand. That’s the way America has always been – and most “progressives” are still the same way.

    The Church is what gets me though. When the bench near you in church is always empty. Or people bound up to similar-skinned visitors and yet somehow “don’t notice” you.

  11. seonghuhn says:

    I hate that t-shirt.
    Thanks for speaking out, enjoyed the sermon clip.

  12. […] we don’t shout and at times, be an angry asian man…who will? Remember the Abercrombie & Fitch campaign featuring the infamous Two Wongs can […]

  13. […] we don’t shout and at times, be an angry asian man, who will? Remember the Abercrombie & Fitch campaign featuring the infamous Two Wongs can make […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

"He must become greater; I must become less." - John 3:30 We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

Be faithful.

PS: Also, it helps to get some Vitamin D especially if you live in the rainy Northwest Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on.

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,461,112 hits