Eugene Cho

the beautiful and broken story

img-lindsayStories are essential. Our ability to experience, process, and share our stories is one of the reasons that make us uniquely human and a reminder, in my opinion, of affirmation that we are created in the image of our loving God.

The Scriptures is a profound narrative of God – unfolding his identity, purpose, and commitment to His creation.  It’s also a narrative about God’s relationship with humankind.

But when I talk about story, I’m talking about “all” of it and not just the nice parts.  Before Christ and after Christ – which is why I’m so compelled by Paul’s ‘sharing’ of his story (before and after Christ) throughout Acts but especially when he talks to the respective kings: Felix, Festus, and Agrippa. As a pastor, I am constantly reminded that with numerous hats I wear, the three I can never take off all involve ‘the story’:

  • sharing and celebrating God’s story
  • being faithful to my story with God
  • learning and loving the stories of your church

I don’t like to gush but I will. I absolutely love this video and the story in the video and the vision behind Deidox.  So much that we showed this video at Quest last Sunday and it was received very well. Deidox (started by by couple dudes I recently met) aims to share the stories of God working in the lives of people.

Take 5 minutes and watch the video below and let me know what you think.

Check out the Deidox website and watch the other two short films. The reasons why I love these films:

  • They’re well made. Excellent.
  • Moves away from the elevation of rock star pastors or the myth that God only works through professional Christians: pastors and missionaries.
  • They’re about every day people.  Umm, like your neighbors.  Hopefully, that includes your diverse neighbors. 🙂
  • It’s about the story.

Filed under: bible, christianity, faith, , ,

15 Responses

  1. esther says:

    excellent! i loved that Lindsay’s heart was made so transparent and real through this film. thanks for sharing…

  2. Karen says:

    As a kindred spirit who teaches while being human, I loved the clip. Last tag, thanks for being IT!

  3. adrianawin says:

    Thanks Eugene for sharing this video. It has reminded me as a parent to show my own children they cannot earn my love.

  4. Leah says:

    Wow, what an awesome story–I aspire to be that kind of teacher!

  5. Peter says:

    Wow. Very inspiring indeed.

  6. Debbie says:

    We visited Quest last Sunday and saw the video there (my youngest will start as a freshman at SPU in Sept. and wanted to check out Quest). Liked the video b/c it was a real person sharing a real piece of her story. I have seen enough Rob Bell/Nooma videos to last me for a while….I will never be Rob Bell.Definitely not nearly cool enough. Lindsey being who God called her to be was affirming—like I can be who called has called me to be and that’s enough. Then of course it was very cool to have the opportunity to share with others in service pieces of our own stories. It was well-used in the context of the service.

  7. gar says:

    Wow! Such a great film, and a reminder of my own personal perspectives on teaching.

    The opening scene where she was sitting on the subway gave me flashbacks especially to my time living and working in Japan, but what got me a little choked up is the expression on her face at about 4:49. I’ve made it myself many times, sitting at my desk after school’s out, planning lessons, but mostly thinking about, worrying, and praying for my students.

  8. Karl Kroger says:

    Wow, what a powerful witness! Thank you so much for sharing this. I’m can be easily moved by the combination of story, film, and music–so I felt like crying through half of this, but it was truly amazing.

    We don’t have to give people tracts, we don’t have to condemn people to hell. We just need to let the love of Christ radiate out of us like Lindsay. That’s not to say we can’t ever tell people about Jesus. But this is where it starts.

  9. […] of our favorite bloggers, Eugene Cho, recently wrote a humbling review of Deidox.  Ever since personally meeting Eugene, we’ve been big fans of his blog.  Eugene […]

  10. […] to Eugene Cho for pointing to Deidox, a series of short films “telling true stories of an active […]

  11. […] the nice white lady when we should be praising so many of our educators in our society. Remember this post I shared earlier about the power of stories and in that case, Lindsay’s […]

  12. […] the nice white lady when we should be praising so many of the educators in our society. Check out this post on my blog about the power of stories, and in that case, Lindsay’s story from Deidox […]

  13. […] Loved this story that Eugene shared on his blog. […]

  14. Kaylin says:

    Thank you so much for sharing this video. As a middle school teacher in a very similar setting, it reminded me so much of my own experiences. It brought tears to my eyes. Thank you again.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on. I have to remind myself of this every day...because I can forget every day:

Don't be lazy and make assumptions about people. Ask about their story. Then listen. Be humble. Be teachable. Be human. Be a good neighbor. It's a sad reality but our society runs on the currency of fear. Don't feed into this frenzy.

Rather, invest in faith, hope, and love.

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,459,896 hits