Eugene Cho

video interview: dave gibbons & ‘the monkey and the fish’

gibbons21I want to introduce you to Dave Gibbons. He’s known in some circles and not in others but what he has to share and offer is important to the larger Church – especially as the World changes in a way that the majority of the Church cannot see or [want to] acknowledge.  I first met Dave about 14 years ago on a tour bus in Seoul, Korea [a long story].  This was before he planted NewSong Church and before Quest Church was even a thought in my heart.  

One of the things that’s most impressed me about Dave – in his various roles – is his vision as a ‘social entrepeneur.’ And honestly, I’m also encouraged that he’s one of the handful of Asian-American faces that’s recognized in the so called ‘mainstream subculture of Western Christianity’.  Truth be told, he’s half Korean and half Irish but we’re going to go ahead and claim him.

As my readers know, I’m working through my list of books I want to read this year and his new book, The Monkey and the Fish: Liquid Leadership in a Third Culture Church,is on that list.  I had a chance to sit down with him and ask about leadership, his understanding of social entrepreneurship, ministry and of course, the idea of “Third Culture’ and The Monkey and the Fish.’  You may also be interested in checking out my recent video interviews with Scot McKnight and Phyllis Tickle.

Here’s the interview:

Filed under: asian-american, christianity, emerging church, ministry, pastors, religion,

15 Responses

  1. good stuff man, thanks for sharing this. I started reading his book on the plane today and am absolutely loving it…

  2. Wayne Park says:

    Dave cites Nouwen’s In The Name of Jesus as his premiere book for leadership. Man am I thankful for this, as it is a book that’s affecting me deeply now. I’m glad he didn’t mention something from John Maxwell or some other CEO-type leadership approach, not that it’s bad, but it’s just not it when it comes to pastoral leadership, I think.

  3. coachmickey says:

    Dave and Eugene,
    Awesome and thanks for sharing.
    I will be speaking with Dave before I leave for France and The Philippines.
    Who knows, a side trip to a seriously rural area is in the plan too?

  4. steph says:

    great book – i actually just finished reading it and immediately turned back to the beginning to read it over again! thanks for the interview.

  5. akoosticman says:

    going to read this on the plane ride back tomorrow! good seeing you eugene!

  6. Lon says:

    I’m reading this one right now.. thanks for sharing to the both of you!

  7. Charles Lee says:

    Dude…I should have had you do all the interviews at the Idea Camp…:) You’re awesome. It was good to hang out with you this past weekend.

  8. Barb says:

    Eugene, I love all your interviews–I’ve just finished this book–I’ve been trying to tell people what it is about–now I’ll send them a link to this interview.

  9. daniel so says:

    Eugene — Great interview! Dave’s insights into leadership are really powerful. I’m still wrapping my head around some of the things he talked about at The Idea Camp… leadership is building trust and bearing pain; leadership is painful adaptation. I’m with Wayne – that Dave cites Nouwen as a primary influence is so encouraging.

  10. DK says:

    Eugene! It was great downing some Chik-Fil-A and In N Out while talking about the Literacy issues of our friend at the table… haha. would love to visit Seattle some day and hang with y’all! Great job on the interview

  11. […] the way, davegibbons.tv is now powered by wordpress too! Plus, Eugene Cho interviewed Dave this past weekend; watch the video at eugenecho.com […]

  12. What a great book.. the book says several things which seem so obvious to many people who live outside of America that you wonder why anyone would write a whole book about it. But these are not that obvious to large segments of the evangelical world in the U.S.

  13. […] grateful for these words, working in my soul right now. Which is why I was so thrilled to hear in Eugene Cho’s interview of Dave Gibbons that his (Gibbon’s) fav book on leadership is the above book by Nouwen. You kind of see why […]

  14. Currently it looks like BlogEngine is the best blogging platform available right now. (from what I’ve read) Is that what you’re using on your blog?

  15. Janean Devan says:

    Usually I do not read post on blogs, however I would like to say that this write-up very pressured me to check out and do it! Your writing taste has been amazed me. Thanks, quite nice post.

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One Day’s Wages

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We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

Be faithful.

PS: Also, it helps to get some Vitamin D especially if you live in the rainy Northwest Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on. I have to remind myself of this every day...because I can forget every day:

Don't be lazy and make assumptions about people. Ask about their story. Then listen. Be humble. Be teachable. Be human. Be a good neighbor.

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