Eugene Cho

charity: water

Hey folks, I’m hanging out here in Southern California speaking and learning at a new “unconference” called The Idea Camp. It’s been referred to as an “unconference” because the event is free and focus placed on the conversations rather than just the speakers.  How wonderful is that concept?  

Yesterday, I led a chat on ‘Engaging Culture and Conversation’ and tonight, I have the privilege of sharing a little bit of our global poverty initative with everyone here.  If you’re interested, you can watch it LIVE online at http://theideacamplive.com.  

After my chat, you’ll want to stick around to watch an interview a presentation with Scott Harrison, founder and president of Charity:Water.  I’m incredibly excited because it happens to be one of my favorite orgs and most of you already know that water happens to be an issue dear to me.  It wasn’t planned but we’ll get a chance to grab some food and chat afterwards.

But in thinking of Charity:Water, I wanted to ask you this simple question:

What are some of your favority non-profit orgs and causes?  Why?

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9 Responses

  1. Melissa says:

    My favorites are:
    * Free the Slaves (www.freetheslaves.net)
    * Food for the Hungry (www.fh.org)
    * Union Gospel Mission (www.ugm.org)
    * The Butterfly Project (www.thebutterflyproject.com)

  2. […] the original here: tonight w/ charity:water « beauty and depravity :because-it-happens, Charity, incredibly-excited, minute-chat, scott, […]

  3. Debbie says:

    The Compassion Center in Salfit, Palestine. A Christian NGO which works in an almost 100% Mulsim community. Among other things, we train women in computers, secretarial skills and English to equip them with job skills. We also provide summer camps and year round support for local kids. The center is connected with a relief project as well, which provides food, clothing and medical care for those in need.

    I teach English for the Hanan Center. One of my classes is for the Governorate of Salfit. All of my students in the class work for the local government. They will tell you that water is a HUGE issue here. Salfit is rich in natural springs so the Jewish settlements are built all around it and the Palestinians have to pay to get their own water back.

    Sewage from homes and chemicals from factories up in the Jewish Settlements on the hills surrounding the town pour down into Salfit. Black water flows within feet of homes in some areas. Agriculture is destroyed, animals die, people have skin diseases and cancer because of it, children are constantly sick. In the settlements, there are swimming pools and there is clean water for everyone to drink. The people of Salfit have no way of defending themselves beyond recording and publishing the details of the situation. The end result of Zionist theology.

  4. Wayne Park says:

    great talk E; Ash and I watched it all online as well as the following presentation by Scott. Honestly, I’m envious of having missed out; alas, I must be faithful to school for the time being.

  5. I could use some water…the water pump that supplies water pressure to my area has been barely functional for almost 4 months now.
    When I turn a faucet and water flows forth…it seems like a miracle. Seriously, it’s an odd feeling to be so thankful for water.
    So far I haven’t had to buy drinking water to wash my dishes with…but i feel that day may be upon me soon.

  6. Gudge says:

    My favorites:

    IJM (www.ijm.org) – Great
    Eden Reforestation Projects (www.edenprojects.org)
    International Interns (http://www.ii4u.org/ – cheesy website but great work)
    Food for the Hungry (www.fh.org)
    Union Rescue Mission (www.urm.org)

  7. Daniel Li says:

    Some of my favorites are:

    Save the Children.
    Invisible Children.
    IJM.
    Heifer Project.

  8. Kacie says:

    Good question.
    My personal favorite is the International Rescue Committee, despite the fact that they are not a Christian organization. They do the best refugee resettlement here in Dallas and I’ve been following their blog about their work overseas and have loved it.

    I also love and have great confidence in Compassion International

    The other organizations that I have been impressed with are IJM, Invisible Children, Blood/Water Mission…

    And then there are mission organizations like Wycliffe Bible Translators… which I grew up with. 🙂

  9. Andrew Murray says:

    Dalit Freedom Network. I like the holistic approach they take to approaching their cause. You can learn more here: http://www.dalitnetwork.org/

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"He must become greater; I must become less." - John 3:30 We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

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If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

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The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
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