Eugene Cho

name and claim a private jet

I usually don’t make my schedule this hectic not only for personal sanity reasons but because I have a wife that will knock me out.  But every now and then, it just happens.  When I was given the chance to travel to South Africa, it was a no brainer.  But it also created a whirlwind of  a schedule that has left me a little exhausted and unable to put together a string of blog posts I really want to write.

In a span of about 96 hours, I’ll have flown from Durban to Capetown, South Africa; then 12 hours from Capetown to Frankfurt; 6 hours layover in early wee hours at the Frankfurt airport; then another 12 hours from Frankfurt to Seattle.  I felt fine during the bulk of my trip but I think the sushi I ate during my stay in Capetown caught up to me.  What’s the lesson here?  Perhaps, it’s to avoid sushi in Africa but the problem is that sushi is my kyrptonite.  I eat it anywhere and everywhere I can afford it.

Or perhaps, my body just ain’t what it used to be and the return flights just broke it down because by late Saturday and early Sunday, I was vomiting up a hurricane and shaking like a bad dancer.  Yes, I admit that I was tempted to call in sick but I didn’t want to miss preaching at Quest two Sundays in a row.  Thankfully, I made it through all three services on Sunday but had a bucket for any vomitaceous uprisings by the pulpit just in case.  And for those who like vivid images, I actually did vomit a little [in my mouth] during the 9.15am service only to swallow it back in.  

Like a good pastor, I took one for the team.

Between the 2nd and 3rd service where most folks were watching some obscure game called the Super Bowl, I crashed and slept.  Woke up in time to get to the 5pm service at 5.02pm.

And to test the body one more time, I catch the earliest flight possible in a few hours to tropical Chicago for a few days at the Covenant Midwinter Conference.  While exhausted, I look forward to the one opportunity each year I get to meet, connect, and be encouraged by folks within my denomination.  I jokingly change my name to Eugene Chohannson in tribute to the Swedish roots of the denomination but if you didn’t know, it’s one of the few denominations with a serious commitment to diversity and multiculturalism – not for the sake of being politically correct but because it theologically, biblically, and sociologically critical.

So back to the whirlwind 96 hour schedule:  Durban, Capetown, Frankfurt, Seattle, Chicago, and eventually back to Seattle soon.  

I ain’t into prosperity theology but right about now, I’d like to name and claim that Private Jet.  Any witnesses in da house?

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14 Responses

  1. dean says:

    If it makes you feel any better, I’d let you borrow my private jet … if I had one.

  2. AndrewP says:

    “Like a good pastor, I took one for the team.”

    I just gained a whole new level of respect for you!

  3. Panama is another place to never eat sushi – unless you like the mall food court variety. Just thought I’d let you know, just in case you find your self in Panama one of these days with a hankering for sushi. 🙂 Hope you’re feeling a little less erp-y soon.

  4. Matt says:

    steamin, willie beamin…

    I bet you REALLY started preachin up a storm after you got that bit of vomit up.

  5. Randall says:

    Please tell me none of the small vomit got on the headset mic…

  6. Ric Wild says:

    Eugene, I was just in Chicago for some of the Pre-Midwinter events. I saw Leah in the lobby and was wondering if you’d be making it out, too.

    Glad to hear that I’m not the only Covenant outsider. I’m thinking about changing my name to Johnson.

  7. eugenecho says:

    I cannot lie.

    The sushi I ate was at a mall in Capetown. It is my kyptonite.

  8. Aaron says:

    Contact Ford, GM, or Chrysler… I hear they have a couple of jets that are idle right now.

    No really, I will pray for rest!

  9. mellocello says:

    what??? ewww!!! i knew it!!! when you did that thing with your fist! ah! i am both wildly disgusted and slightly fascinated at the same time. i really appreciate that you kept it in. feel really bad that you felt so bad, but you have no idea what that means to someone who has such an irrational fear of barf.

  10. eugenecho says:

    @mellocello: i swallowed it back in for you.

  11. mellocello says:

    well i certainly do appreciate that. you can name your jet the “vomit comet.”

  12. Wow, that’s an epic journey. Private jets are awesome but you know you’re a hard working pastor when you have to name and claim a vomit bucket.

    Let us know how the Chicago sushi treats you 😉

  13. The Chiz says:

    Eugene Chohannson? Do you have a sister named Scarlett?

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