Eugene Cho

middle school!?!

Yesterday, Minhee and I took our oldest daughter for a tour of our local middle school in preparation for the inevitable…she’s growing up. She’s now 10 years old, asks adultish questions, and will be entering middle school in the Fall. This might be another reason why I’m going through my extended mid-life reflection right now.

Question:  What was your middle school experience like?

It’s been so long since the middle school years that I forgot what it was like until I toured the school and classes with our daughter yesterday.  There are over 900 students in her future middle school and class begins at 7.45am!  Goodness gracious.

Over Christmas, our family traveled to San Francisco and it was good to take my kids to visit my middle school.  I was a student at Aptos Middle School in the early ’80s.  Honestly, I don’t remember much.  The first year, I was incredibly and painfully shy.  Not many friends and was actually voted in as “most shy” but I guess people knew who I was.  My claim to fame in middle school was breaking our school’s Decathlon record.  I wonder if my name is still up in the gymnasium.

In case you don’t know this already:  Time flies…Enjoy.  

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Filed under: family

9 Responses

  1. RjL says:

    My daughter is only 2, so I’m a long ways away. But things like this can’t be helping you:

    http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/bestoftv/2009/01/15/pn.sexting.teens.cnn

    Pave the way, and keep me posted.

  2. Ben C says:

    Junior high was all right… Redmond Junior High. Wasn’t all that challenging, but I never complained. I just lived life in Education Hill, played tennis and soccer.

    I started growing up and forming the basis of my identity at The Overlake School (high school years). I would cough up the tuition to send my kids there should I have any in the future and assuming I’m living in the Seattle metro.

  3. Jim Chen says:

    I don’t remember too much, but it was fun. Life was easy and carefree. I too didn’t feel so comfortable at school, but my home life was great. I was the smart kid, the teacher’s pet (ha-ha).

  4. Chris Scott says:

    It sucked. It sucked bad, until I met some friends from a youth group who took me in, loved me, gave me fulfillment, purpose and meaning.

  5. jan owen says:

    just wait til your kids are going to college!!!! My last one leaves for college this fall – I am TOO YOUNG for this!!! I am!

  6. Carolyn says:

    I went to Washington Middle School for the first two years of middle school, and it was amazing. I was in the APP program, which I highly recommend trying to get your daughter into, at least at the middle school level (it goes to crap at the high school level). I was writing 10 pages papers in 6th grade, and loving it.

    Then we moved cross-country. That part was not so good. I’ve been out of middle school seven years now, and I can still remember the isolation and desperation I felt in eighth grade. Just love her especially hard right now, even though it’s going to be rough on you (I would assume. I have no children, as I am only 20).

    Anyway, good luck to her! And good luck to you– you’re almost to the teenage years.

  7. Rachel says:

    We just had junior high. Junior High School sucked.

    Youth group was OK.

    Peer relationships were hard to navigate.

    I remember having a hard time connecting in 7th grade and not having a phone, which made it harder. I was also the third girl in my class and three girls NEVER works out well. I remember my dad telling me that there were 30 days in a month and 31 Proverbs and to read one every day. That worked well for my legalistic self and probably helped a lot. I remember going to camp after 7th grade and seeing other Christian kids who worshipped God and that was great and an encouragement. It’s when I decided that I was going to follow God because I wanted to, not because my parents did.

  8. jason says:

    middle school was bad for me…real bad

  9. Jr. high – wow. I went to the science academy so I had to catch the bus at 6am, but got to do fun science stuff – like bird watching camping trips, beach clean-up, trips to NASA…

    I think the most vivid memory was the girl who with her friends every time she saw me in the halls would scream at me, hit me, rip my books, make fun of my because of my disability. As she told me – even though I was white and therefore (???) thought i was better than her (she was black), she was actually better than me because I was missing my arm. And because it was a “race” issue the teachers just stood by and watched and let her beat me up every day…

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One Day’s Wages

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To support both the equality of women and the dignity of the unborn feels like a very lonely place to be but I know we're not alone. May we press on. And may we lead with hope.

I'm at the Women's March in Seattle to show my solidarity with my wife, my mothers, my daughters, and the female congregants of my church. I'm also here to model for my son what we believe in our home. Many people have already expressed their disappointment, dismay, and disgust with my decision. Such is life. We will always disappoint someone. And that's also a lot of words that begin with "d." I'm here not because I agree or disagree with every single statement or sign at this march (although I really liked this one) but because as a Christian, I believe in the fundamental truth that women are fearfully and wonderfully made in the image of God. They are to be valued, heard, and respected.

And because I believe we can't be a flourishing society without the flourishing of women. And because the Church cannot be the Church without the gifts and voices of women. All the gifts of women.

And in doing so, may we together honor the sanctity of life - from womb to tomb. Collaboration.

col·lab·o·ra·tion
kəˌlabəˈrāSH(ə)n/
noun

the action of working with someone or a group of others  to produce or create something.

May we hold our logos, egos, and tribalism have their place. May we hold them loosely for they too shall pass. May we collaborate for the sake of the greater Kingdom of God ... which endures forever. As we honor Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., don't forget the God behind the man. The one true God who deposited this dream into MLK is still speaking to us today. Are we listening?

Be courageous. Be brave.

Being invited by the King Family to speak at the MLK worship service at Ebenezer Baptist Church in 2016 remains one of the most unexpected honors of my life. On the right is his daughter, Dr. Bernice King and his sister, Dr. Christine King Farris. Walking throughstreet markets in different parts of the world is the best. Soaking in the culture. Listening to the local language and music. Enjoying the amazing cuisine. Meeting new friends. Praying for the Gospel to penetrate. #ChiangRai Blessed be the local, indigenous leaders for it is they who live in the very communities they seek to love. For it is they who understand their context and culture...better than a Westerner ever will. For it is they who will continue to tenaciously pursue a better world with hope, justice and love when visitors like me leave.

Yes, blessed be the local, indigenous leaders. What an honor and privilege to celebrate with the on-the-ground local @thefreedomstory team to celebrate the recent opening of their Education and Resource Center for the local youth in Chiang Rai, Thailanf. This was made possible through a partnership and matching grant by @onedayswages and The Freedom Story.

While it was an honor to be there to cut the cord and say a few words, this is an example of collaboration. Much love to the Freedom Story team including their co-founders Tawee Donchai and @Rachel Goble, to their staff who live in the community, who understand their context and culture, and who tenaciously pursue a better world with hope, justice and love. And of course, much love to the students themselves for they each matter. Finally, to each person that donated to @onedayswages to make this grant possible.

May hundreds and even thousands of youth be impacted, encouraged, and mentored. May they capture a glimpse of God's love for them.

Photo: @benjaminedwards

my tweets

  • Really loved this sign from the women's march from one of our church congregants. Counter cultural. Subversive. L… twitter.com/i/web/status/8… || 4 hours ago
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  • To support both the equality of women & the dignity of the unborn feels like a very lonely place to be but we're not alone. May we press on. || 8 hours ago
  • Going to the Women's March in Seattle bc as a Christian, I believe women are fearfully and wonderfully made and are to be heard & respected. || 11 hours ago
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