Eugene Cho

in loving memory of amy boyd

Quest hosted a memorial service yesterday [between the 2nd & 3rd service] for Amy [in red sweater] who at the age of 89, past away couple weeks ago to be reunited with Jesus. 

She joined Quest via the church merger.  Despite the “changes” in church including much louder music and longer sermons, she was always at Quest whenever her body allowed her to join us.  I didn’t know Amy very well but had an opportunity to chat with her for about 2 hours a few months ago when I visited her at the hospital. She fell in the church’s parking lot and broke her hip.  My conversation with her was honestly one of the highlights of this past year for me.  She shared so much joy, wisdom, and hope in Christ.  I will never forget that conversation.

I was deeply encouraged today when her caretaker came up to me after the memorial service and said:

“Reverend Cho.  I want you to know that Amy thought so highly of you and your wife.  She enjoyed your wife coming over to her home for crafts and conversation…”

We will miss her at Quest Church and I look forward to further conversations with Amy someday.  Here is a glimpse of her amazing life:

Amy born on Vashon, Washington on June 8, 1919, was the sixth of eight children born to August and Gertie, Norwegian pioneers who farmed their homestead after moving from Minnesota in 1903. Amy graduated from Vashon High School in 1936.  Like her sisters before her, after high school graduation Amy worked on the family farm for one year. She then moved to Seattle and took over various positions held by her sisters before her, the first being a live-in domestic position with Dexter H’s widow, where sister Laura had worked, and later as a waitress at the Dolly Madison Tea Room, where sister Ella had worked. While working part time, Amy attended Peterson School of Business, which prepared her for wartime jobs at the Port of Embarkation in the Smith Tower and at the War Production Board.

 

Amy officially met her future husband when a ferry captain on the Vashon route turned matchmaker and invited Amy and William “Bill” Boyd to stay on the ferry for its end of day trip to the oil docks. The rest, as they say, is history. Bill, a 1939 Vashon High School graduate, married Amy on November 3, 1945 while on leave from the Army in a candlelight service at Colvos Lutheran Church on Vashon. During their 56 years of marriage, Bill and Amy raised four children.  In addition to being a wife and mother, Amy had various part time positions and retired in 1990 from Interbay Covenant Church (now Quest Church) where she served as church secretary for more than 20 years and “trained” a multitude of pastors. 

 

After Bill’s passing in 2001, Amy continued to live in the family home.  In 2003, Amy had an unsuccessful cataract surgery, which rendered her legally blind.  Although 84 years of age, Amy did not allow this new condition to define her. An avid reader, Amy continued “reading” by listening daily to books on tape. She listened to CNN and rarely missed Larry King’s nightly interviews. She kept track of everything, including the whereabouts of her purse 24 hours a day. She always looked her best and never had to watch her weight even though freely eating cookies and peppermint candy with daily afternoon tea. She liked nothing more than visiting with guests around her dining room table, often serving pastries from Larsen’s bakery in Ballard.  Amy visited with friends and family up to the very day of her passing. She was blessed with six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Amy loved well and was well-loved.

Filed under: family, religion

10 Responses

  1. sam says:

    God bless Amy and her long fruitful life!!!

  2. […] case you need a reminder.   Blogger / Pastor Eugene Cho writes about Amy Boyd, a long time member of his church.  It’s certainly worth a […]

  3. pjchris says:

    PE,
    I appreciated you pointing out Amy’s picture during the service two Sundays ago. It was important to put her face with her name. Amy and Bill were so much part of the fabric of Interbay and Amy was so willing to warp her arms around Quest as well. I have no doubt that Bill was waiting at Jesus side to welcome her home. “Well done, good and faithful servant”. We will miss you, Amy.

  4. DerekMc says:

    What a wonderful story. Thanks for sharing it! It is good to see that Quest church is multi-generational. One of the great privileges of ministry is to be in relationship with people like Amy. I can list quite a few that have gone on to their time of rest, all of them saints, and leaving a lasting legacy in their communities of faith.

  5. andrea nelson says:

    Reverend Cho,
    Thanks so much for your note on remembering my grandma Amy Boyd. She loved Interbay and then was happy to see it grow with the merge of the two churches. She appreciated all that you have done there as well as Paster Ray. We often heard of you, your wife and your kids. She loved the activity that went on there. Thanks so much for making her feel welcome as well as the family on Sunday as it was the church we all grew up in and were then reunited with the church family of past and present generations. Keep up the great work you and God are doing in the church. The Boyd family is quite proud of Interbay Quest.
    Blessings,
    Andrea Nelson

  6. eugenecho says:

    @andrea: thanks so much for visiting the blog and your comment.

    minhee and i were loved by amy and we certainly appreciated her presence in our family and church. we were blown away at the number of folks that came to honor her life at the memorial celebration.

  7. Aaron Soderlund says:

    Hi Eugene,
    Thanks for writing your article about Grandma Amy. As Andrea, my sister, (the post above) said, we grew up attending Interbay whenever we stayed at her house and for Christmas Eve services as long as I can remember, and we used that basement area for family Christmas events – I think we got to use it because we had an “in” with the church office lady. The service was actually my first time INSIDE since it had become Quest. And despite the sadness that obviously goes along with the loss of a family member, there is such hope and joy in death with Jesus. And there is almost no place better to associate grandma with than Interbay/Quest which played such a huge part in Grandpa Bill and Grandma Amy’s lives. Thank you for writing your blog about our grandma. We obviously know her story, but it’s not as if she was the most vocal lady around in the past 5 years or so. So it’s wonderful to know that other people get to learn a little about a large figure in my life. Thank you for being there for the service. Also, I hope we can catch up again soon sometime as well.

    Thanks,
    Aaron

  8. Barb Boyd says:

    Pastor Eugene,
    The week before my mom passed away, she asked her friend Heather to explain what a “blog” was because she heard about your blog on Sundays at Quest. How do you explain to someone who is 89 and blind what a blog is? My mom kept up on a lot of things but it was really difficult for her to understand things that had totally changed technologically in her lifetime and especially since she had lost her sight. She is no doubt enjoying being mentioned on your blog and is flashing us one of her famous smiles from above now that she is in heaven, now that she can see again, and now that she really “gets” what a blog is!! Thanks for honoring her. Barb

  9. eugenecho says:

    aaron/barb:

    thanks for stopping by the blog.

    as you all know, amy was special. i had heard so much how she has trained all the interbay pastors for so many years. and while i never had the privilege of being “trained” by her at the office, i can’t tell you how much i thoroughly enjoyed that afternoon chat with her months ago when she was resting at the hospital.

    i remember the exact day. i was on my way to visit her when seattle it started snowing very heavy. i was going to return home but decided to keep going. one of the best decisions…had a great time with amy. really refreshed my soul at a time when i really needed refreshing.

    god bless you both and your families…

  10. Heather Pann says:

    I lived with Amy for two years when I first moved to Seattle. We grew to be the best of friends. The 50+ age difference didn’t matter at all. As you know from your conversation with her, Amy was intelligent, full-of-life and rooted very deeply in her faith. She was also an amazing prayer warrior. About two years ago, I was given guardianship of my then 14-year old cousin. It was not an easy transition but Amy prayed for us faithfully. She was our haven. Every Friday night Amy opened her heart and her home to Brooke and her friends. We ate pizza, watched movies and did our nails. Amy participated in all of the activities and made a special point of visiting with the teenagers. At the end of last school year, we were unsure about whether Brooke would be returning this fall. When she said good-bye to Amy in June, it was with a heavy heart, but Amy said, “I am not going to say good-bye because I think you will be back in September.” Amy prayed throughout the summer and sure enough, one day before school started I picked my cousin up at the airport. Brooke is fond of telling everyone that her “Grandma” Amy prayed her back to Seattle.
    We miss her but what a legacy she left us. Thank you for remembering her in your blog. ~Heather

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stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. Thanks for your prayers. 
I have numerous stories to share but for now, the following came up in every conversation with Iraqi/Syrian refugees:

1 Have tea with us. Or coffee. Or juice. Or something with lots of sugar in it. Or better yet, all of the above.
2 We want peace. We want security. 
3 We hate ISIS. 
4 We just want to go home.
5 Please don't forget us.

Please don't forget them... Father, please bless and protect these Iraqi and Syrian "refugee" children that have already endured so much. Protect their hearts and mind from unfathomable trauma. Plant seeds of hope and vision in their lives. And as we pray for them, teach us how to advocate for them. Amen. "We don't call them refugees. We call them relatives. We don't call them camps but centers. Dignity is so important." -  local Iraqi priest whose church has welcomed many "relatives" to their church's property

It's always a privilege to be invited into peoples' home for tea - even if it's a temporary tent. This is an extended Yezidi family that fled the Mosul, Iraq area because of ISIS. It's indeed true that Christians were targeted by ISIS and thatbstory muat be shared but other minority groups like the Yezidis were also targeted. Some of their heartbreaking stories included the kidnapping of their sister. They shared that their father passed away shortly of a "broken heart." The conversation was emotional but afterwards, we asked each other for permission to take photos. Once the selfies came out, the real smiles came out.

So friends: Pray for Iraq. Pray for the persecuted Church. Pray for Christians, minority groups like the Yezidis who fear they will e completely wiped out in the Middle East,, and Muslims alike who are all suffering under ISIS. Friends: I'm traveling in the Middle East this week - Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. (Make sure you follow my pics/stories on IG stories). Specifically, I'm here representing @onedayswages to meet, learn, and listen to pastors, local leaders, NGOs, and of course directly from refugees from within these countries - including many from Syria.

For security purposes, I haven't been able to share at all but I'm now able to start sharing some photos and stories. For now, I'll be sharing numerous photos through my IG stories and will be sharing some longer written pieces in couple months when ODW launches another wave of partnerships to come alongside refugees in these areas. Four of us are traveling together also for the purpose of creating a short documentary that we hope to release early next year.

While I'm on my church sabbatical, it's truly a privilege to be able to come to these countries and to meet local pastors and indigenous leaders that tirelessly pursue peace and justice, and to hear directly from refugees. I've read so many various articles and pieces over the years and I thought I was prepared but it has been jarring, heartbreaking,  and gut wrenching. In the midst of such chaos, there's hope but there's also a lot of questions, too.

I hope you follow along as I share photos, stories, and help release this mini-documentary. Please tag friends that might be interested.

Please pray for safety, for empathy, for humility and integrity, for divine meetings. Pray that we listen well; To be present and not just be a consumer of these vulnerable stories. That's my biggest prayer.

Special thanks to @worldvisionusa and @worldrelief for hosting us on this journey. 9/11
Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.

Today, I had some gut wrenching and heart breaking conversations about war, violence, and peacemaking. Mostly, I listened. Never in my wildest imagination did I envision having these conversations on 9/11 of all days. I wish I could share more now but I hope to later after I process them for a few days.

But indeed: Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.
May it be so. Amen. Mount Rainier is simply epic. There's nothing like flying in and out of Seattle.

#mountrainier
#seattle
#northwestisbest

my tweets

  • Boom. Final fishing trip. Grateful. A nice way to end my 3 month sabbatical. #catchandrelease twitter.com/i/web/status/9… || 20 hours ago
  • Christians: May we be guided by the Scriptures that remind us, "Seek first the Kingdom of God" and not, "Seek first the kingdom of America." || 21 hours ago
  • Every convo with Iraqi/Syrian refugees included: 1 Have tea with us 2 We want peace 3 We hate ISIS 4 We want to go home 5 Don't forget us || 3 days ago
  • Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan to assess @OneDaysWages' partnerships & to film mini-documentary on refugee crisis. So many emotions. || 3 days ago
  • Pray for Mexico. For those mourning loved ones. For those fighting for life - even under rubbles. For rescue workers. Lord, in your mercy. || 3 days ago
  • Don't underestimate what God can do through you. God has a very long history of using foolish and broken people for His purposes and glory. || 6 days ago