Eugene Cho

why blogging matters

I want to encourage YOU to start blogging…especially those who email me regularly about what I should blog about.  🙂  My response:  “Hey, you blog about it!”

And not because there’s money, power, and fame in blogging but because it gives you a chance to express your voice and engage in an ever interconnected world.  Check out this video.  Granted, it sounds like an overdone commerical for WordPress but is also a simple reminder of the influence of blogging. [h/t depraved tyler]

As for why I blog, I’ve shared it on couple occassions before but I’ll share it again.  Is blogging time consuming?  It certainly can be but I try to devote 30 mins to writing my entry and another half hour through the day checking on the blog. 

Why do you blog?  Or for some of you, why don’t you blog?

Reasons why I blog:

  1. To process some of my own thoughts, prayers, struggles, and dreams. Most of these are just my vomitaceous thoughts.  If you’re a pastor, I don’t you can afford NOT to blog…provided you have a mature and discerning understanding of confidentiality.
  2. To connect with my faith community. While I am the primary teacher at Quest, I discovered a growing disconnect with the church – particularly as the church grew larger. This blog is another way to connect with this community.  I don’t want to only be a dude behind a pulpit.  That would seriously suck.
  3. To connect with others in Seattle – both secular and spiritual. When people ask me where I pastor, I honestly think to myself [and sometimes respond]: “I pastor the greater Seattle area.”  The larger city is my parish. You’d be surprised at the number of people that have randomly come up to me and said, “I know you through your blog.”  Kinda freaky but kinda cool as long as they’re not blog stalkers.
  4. To add my voice to the blogosphere and particularly those who share similar interests. I enjoy reading other people’s blogs but sometimes it feels suffocating because like many things, it’s dominated by White Men. Nothing against my white male brothers – particularly those with tattoos and frizzy goattees but I felt compelled to add my voice to the collective and to hopefully inspire others to raise up their voices.
  5. For better or worse [meaning: learn from my mistakes], be a mentor to younger pastors and leaders – particularly to churchplanters, Asian-American pastors, and other Christian leaders and pastors who especially wrestle with their sense of ecclesiology and missiology in a fast changing postmodern and postchurch world.  Because I’m no longer able to engage in regular phone calls or email dialogue, I often direct people to posts that I’ve written that might be helpful.  I’m 38 and need to stop dorking around and do my part before I croak and die.
  6. To record my journey – so that one day, my kids can read about the journeys of their old man. I really really want my kids to grow up thinking that their father was at least a little hip. Seriously, I hope wordpress doesn’t go defunct anytime soon or that would really suck too.
  7. To somehow convey that pastors or Christians aren’t stupid religious people that don’t have the ability to engage in humor, critical thought, or have “regular” lives.  I’m a Christian and a follower of Jesus but I ain’t perfect, saintly, or perfectly holy.  I fart just like you and sometimes, they’re bad.  Really bad.

Filed under: religion, technology, ,

12 Responses

  1. Kelly says:

    Silly as it may sound, my blog serves as motivation to experience new things. I am often tempted on the weekends to hole up in our house and spend a couple of days vegging out. But this doesn’t make for a very interesting blog post, and since I am committed to posting somewhat regularly, I do my best to frequently get out of the house and make or do something new, for the sake of a good blog post. May sound backward, but it works for those times when “new experiences just for the sake of new experiences” doesn’t quite cut it.

  2. eugenecho says:

    kelly: i enjoy your blog but let me also say, you take some great photos too.

  3. Dave says:

    Eugene,

    Wonderful to see your humanity, humor, and desire to engage in the conversation. Keep up the faith and great work!

    From a frat bro & white guy who doesn’t yet blog and has neither a tat or goatee. 🙂

  4. Randall says:

    I blog because I’m a lazy, insecure writer who needs to know that he’s being read (hit counter).

    And I blog because writing helps me organize my thoughts. Often I’ll start an entry with a question and in writing about the question I often end up with new insights on the matter.

    And I blog because I love writing…well, let me clarify that. It’s like what Dorothy Parker said: “I hate writing, I love having written.”

    …and yeah, I haven’t put up anything new lately but I’ve been busy moving into my new place. I’ll be back in Hawaii this weekend, maybe I’ll carve out some time to blog from there.

  5. alliehope says:

    I blog to vent my spleen about stuff that frustrates me, to share stuff that inspires me, and to process the millions of influences, subtle and obvious, that are messing with me in any given moment. I’m exceedingly undisciplined about it, but I enjoy writing as well. Does one need a reason to blog?

  6. In all honesty, I first started blogging to shamelessly promote my book. (Must have helped; I just signed a contract for publication last week!) But since launching the site, I’ve found more joy in blogging than I ever thought I would.

    So, now I blog because…

    1. I love “meeting” new people and learning from a whole range of perspectives
    2. Instant feedback via comments/ Google analytics is indeed gratifying
    3. It forces me to write more consistently
    4. It gives me an opportunity to test out new ideas and see how people respond to them
    5. It gives my husband a break from any impromptu “rants” against the Republican Party (or whatever it may be.) My readers have to hear it instead. Not surprisingly, my husband was very eager to help put the site together!
    6. I still get the chance to shamelessly promote my book.

    BTW: This blog’s one of my favorites! Glad to hear you have no intentions of quitting any time soon!

  7. mary says:

    I think I might fit in the category of “blog stalker,” stumbling upon and now following your blog over the last couple of months. I have sheepishly avoided posting any comments, for some reason feeling strange about doing so because you and your readers don’t know me and I feel, through reading this blog, that I have come to know you. Perhaps that is a good reason for my own blogging–it reveals me–to strangers, to friends, and to myself. It provides reflection and connection to others, in a way that an often-introvert such as myself would find challenging in a conversational setting. I’m much better at communicating in writing. I have also kept journals all my life, and enjoy being able to look back and trace my journey over the years–previously on paper, now through my blog entries.

    I was recently pondering the bombardment of blogs on the internet, wondering if my little corner really serves any purpose other than to myself. Thanks for this entry–reminding me that even if that’s the case, it’s okay. And I’ll try to move out of the “blog stalker” category by introducing myself (yes, my husband and I were at Quest this past Sunday) next time you walk by!

  8. carl says:

    the best part of blogs is that I get to “meet” people like you. it’s sometimes tough to walk w/ Jesus when the way you’re walking is sometimes frowned upon. the blogosphere helps you to know “hey you’re not crazy!” there are other people seeking to follow Jesus that doesn’t fit the Americanized version.

    and, best of all, like you said…10-20 years from now when they are old enough to understand, I want my kids to see that I was engaged with the world, with Jesus, with other people. that I wasn’t just a dad, I was a dad with a purpose, with real thoughts, and problems, and fears.

  9. g says:

    I think your kids will someday be pretty fascinated by the fact their Dad kept a blog… they’ll appreciate it at least. Tips on backing on a blog (in case, ya know… something does happen to WordPress):

    http://www.dailyblogtips.com/backup-your-blog-regularly/

    For myself, I wish my father had kept a journal or something now that he’s gone. The closest thing I have are some recordings of his old sermons.

  10. I think blogging has made me feel a lot less isolated… (i.e. finding more within my faith community). My husband and I are intercultural/interracial and live in a small, very MONOCULTURAL town – in some ways, blogging has been a key to keeping some kind of cultural sanity for us (however contrived it may be, it’s better that NOTHING…)

    I have enjoyed blogging as a way to keep up with what is going on beyond my own small world. I use my blog as a means of tracking what I find interesting and intriguing – I’ve so enjoyed getting tips from others that I thought I should return the favor and share what I’ve found as well! Thanks for sharing – I enjoying following your thoughts and experiences…

  11. Teresa says:

    I started blogging after Cyclone Nargis to have a place to post updates as we got them through the non-profit we’re involved with. Then it grew on me…. a) Writing helps me define what convictions I’m willing to act on or stand behind as I put them to paper, b) it helps me connect with my faith community (you can have an opinion or comment, share it, but not fill anyone’s inbox with things they don’t want or need-participation is voluntary, and if they look to see what you think, maybe they were actually interested…), c) helps me connect with others I wouldn’t have met, d) non-public speakers can still have a way to participate with the strengths they have…their voice counts too

  12. Tyler says:

    thanks for the link eugene.

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stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Father, please bless and protect these Iraqi and Syrian "refugee" children that have already endured so much. Protect their hearts and mind from unfathomable trauma. Plant seeds of hope and vision in their lives. And as we pray for them, teach us how to advocate for them. Amen. "We don't call them refugees. We call them relatives. We don't call them camps but centers. Dignity is so important." -  local Iraqi priest whose church has welcomed many "relatives" to their church's property

It's always a privilege to be invited into peoples' home for tea - even if it's a temporary tent. This is an extended Yezidi family that fled the Mosul, Iraq area because of ISIS. It's indeed true that Christians were targeted by ISIS and thatbstory muat be shared but other minority groups like the Yezidis were also targeted. Some of their heartbreaking stories included the kidnapping of their sister. They shared that their father passed away shortly of a "broken heart." The conversation was emotional but afterwards, we asked each other for permission to take photos. Once the selfies came out, the real smiles came out.

So friends: Pray for Iraq. Pray for the persecuted Church. Pray for Christians, minority groups like the Yezidis who fear they will e completely wiped out in the Middle East,, and Muslims alike who are all suffering under ISIS. Friends: I'm traveling in the Middle East this week - Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. (Make sure you follow my pics/stories on IG stories). Specifically, I'm here representing @onedayswages to meet, learn, and listen to pastors, local leaders, NGOs, and of course directly from refugees from within these countries - including many from Syria.

For security purposes, I haven't been able to share at all but I'm now able to start sharing some photos and stories. For now, I'll be sharing numerous photos through my IG stories and will be sharing some longer written pieces in couple months when ODW launches another wave of partnerships to come alongside refugees in these areas. Four of us are traveling together also for the purpose of creating a short documentary that we hope to release early next year.

While I'm on my church sabbatical, it's truly a privilege to be able to come to these countries and to meet local pastors and indigenous leaders that tirelessly pursue peace and justice, and to hear directly from refugees. I've read so many various articles and pieces over the years and I thought I was prepared but it has been jarring, heartbreaking,  and gut wrenching. In the midst of such chaos, there's hope but there's also a lot of questions, too.

I hope you follow along as I share photos, stories, and help release this mini-documentary. Please tag friends that might be interested.

Please pray for safety, for empathy, for humility and integrity, for divine meetings. Pray that we listen well; To be present and not just be a consumer of these vulnerable stories. That's my biggest prayer.

Special thanks to @worldvisionusa and @worldrelief for hosting us on this journey. 9/11
Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.

Today, I had some gut wrenching and heart breaking conversations about war, violence, and peacemaking. Mostly, I listened. Never in my wildest imagination did I envision having these conversations on 9/11 of all days. I wish I could share more now but I hope to later after I process them for a few days.

But indeed: Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.
May it be so. Amen. Mount Rainier is simply epic. There's nothing like flying in and out of Seattle.

#mountrainier
#seattle
#northwestisbest Took a train to Busan. Did not encounter any zombies but I was ready just in case.

Busan. First visit to this city (couple weeks ago) and was blown away by its beauty. Also, shocked that it has become the fifth largest containment port city in the world. That's a lot of import and export.

#MyAttemptToBeTheBestSmartphonePhotographer 
#Pusan #SouthKorea

my tweets

  • Every convo with Iraqi/Syrian refugees included: 1 Have tea with us 2 We want peace 3 We hate ISIS 4 We want to go home 5 Don't forget us || 6 hours ago
  • Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan to assess @OneDaysWages' partnerships & to film mini-documentary on refugee crisis. So many emotions. || 6 hours ago
  • Pray for Mexico. For those mourning loved ones. For those fighting for life - even under rubbles. For rescue workers. Lord, in your mercy. || 6 hours ago
  • Don't underestimate what God can do through you. God has a very long history of using foolish and broken people for His purposes and glory. || 2 days ago
  • Father, bless these Iraqi and Syrian refugee children that have already endured so much. As we pray, teach us how t… twitter.com/i/web/status/9… || 4 days ago
  • Pray for Iraq. Pray for persecuted Church, minority groups (Yezidis) and Muslims alike who are suffering under ISIS: instagram.com/p/BZF2j6Ngrna/ || 4 days ago