Eugene Cho

the closest i got to the olympics

I don’t share this too often because it’s a reminder of the ugly monster called the “fear of failure” that still occasionally creeps up in my life.

It’s good that I’m on sabbatical right now because my entire family and I got really consumed by the Beijing Olympics.  Actually, it was a great family bonding event – watching the events, cheering for athletes, learning about stories, and soaking in the Opening and Closing Ceremonies.  The Olympics were great but then again, when you [China] spend a total of 44 billion dollars on hosting the Olympics, it better be good.

Perhaps like many others, I had dreams of being a future Olympian when I was a young boy.  I grew up loving sports and still do. It was my escape for so many things including my identity crisis as an immigrant.  During middle school, interestingly enough,  I was voted both the shyest and most athletic person.  During high school, I lettered 9 times but the sport I most excelled in was fencing.  I was called “Little Flying Warrior” way before the Chinese game that nickname to Kobe Bryant. 🙂

In 1989, I qualified for the U.S. Junior Olympic Championships.  I had the future lined up.  I would make the U.S. Junior Olympic team, receive a Division I fencing scholarship, and eventually become an Olympian.  The problem was I never got to the 1st phase.  I lost in the quarterfinals and placed 21st in the Junior Olympics.  That was the closest I got to the Olympics.

I was pretty discouraged and quit fencing altogether later that year.  That competition was my last offical fencing bout.

Why did i quit?  Losing sucked and I was afraid to lose again.  I was afraid to fail and that fear of failure paralyzed me.  I have numerous regrets in my life and quitting fencing is one of them.  I can easily concede that I would have never made the Olympics.  Not even close.  But the consistent lessons I’ve learned then and now is that the process, experience, and journey is as, if not, more important than the end result.

While I do have my list of regrets, I’m trying to live my life with hopes of not adding too much to that list.  Here’s to our dreams, goals, and aspirations.  May we all continue to pursue them – in hopes of honoring Christ through our very lives.

Questions:

  • Want to share one or two of your regrets?
  • How about a dream or aspiration you hope to pursue?

————————————

[photo from Getty Images]

Filed under: family, sports, ,

9 Responses

  1. JEN WALTERS says:

    PASTOR CHO, JUST WANTED TO TELL YOU HOW ENCOURAGING IT IS TO HEAR SOMEONE LIKE YOU WHO HAS ACCOMPLISHED SO MUCH TALK ABOUT HIS FAILURES. (EVEN THOUGH TO ME IT DOESN’T SOUND LIKE MUCH OF A FAILURE TO MAKE IT TO THE JUNIOR OLYMPICS) YOUR BLOG REALLY HELPS ME SEE THAT IM NOT THE ONLY ONE AFRAID OF DOING THINGS BECAUSE I MIGHT FAIL AT IT. I’M AT A CROSS ROAD RIGHT NOW WITH MY KIDS GETTING OLDER I CAN GO BACK TO WORK AFTER A LONG ‘BREAK’ LOL! OR GO TO SCHOOL. GULP! HOPE YOU AND YOUR FAMILY ARE FEELING RESTED FROM YOUR SABBATICAL, CANT WAIT TO HAVE YOU BACK. JEN WALTERS

  2. Randall says:

    A friend asked me once, “what do you regret more: the things you’ve done or the things you didn’t do?” And I think the question was more important than the answer. I keep it in the back of my mind and think about it when trying to make big decisions.

    Questions:
    Want to share one or two of your regrets?
    How about a dream or aspiration you hope to pursue?

    * I regret not pursuing that girl, thinking that nice guys just let them go…I mean I’m not stalker material but I really could/should have tried harder. Nuf said.
    * I want to change the world.

  3. Eddie says:

    I regret not writing more. I keep telling myself I’ll start a blog to get started. As for hopes and dreams, I guess it’s related to the first.

  4. miles says:

    Mahalo for the inspiration P.E. I guess there’s not a lot of aspirations that i don’t take risks or give up on. Is there a point when it works in reverse and you persue things too much? =-)

  5. Blake says:

    I regret choosing to not pursuing Tae Kwon Do any further when I was 7 or 8. I could have been a black-belt by the time I was 10 . However, I also don’t regret the choice I made to play in a softball with my best friends instead. Just wish I could have done both.

    I dream about getting my private pilot’s license one day and maybe using that to share the love of flying with inner city kids.

  6. Ben says:

    Given your b-ball court skills back in the days, I can certainly believe you had the athleticism to succeed at a high level in a number of sports.

    You also have a great talent at public speaking and being credible. I really do feel you’ve reached the Olympics in your field which to many (including myself) is greater than the athletic Olympics. Keep up the good work.

    Too bad Korea couldn’t get a W v. Cameroon.

  7. sis says:

    I once had numerous regrets, and adding them up, I felt like a failure. God has healed me. I am beginning to notice how God is now USING even my failures!

    1. I am LEARNING from past mistakes and regrets
    2. I am able to empathize with others at a deeper level
    3. I am witnessing how God is turning many of my failures around

    God is able to make drastic changes, and most of all, HE HAS CHANGED ME.

    Now isn’t that good, or what?

  8. Eugene, I love your blog, and I wish I had more free time to get over here more often. My big regret is wasting time thinking about my failures so that I’m afraid to try again. But I’m working on it! It’s been a rough couple of years for us. But I have to believe God has a plan somewhere in all this mess. Thanks so much for sharing.

  9. Jason Gee says:

    Eugene did u fence for lowell high? If so do u remember me as ur team? I have a request if u know any good coaches for a niece of mine.

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"He Makes All Things New." In other words, Christ is our eternal hope. I'm sitting in my swinging bench on the comforts of my front porch after an exhilarating and exhausting day at church. It never gets tiring, stale, or old to preach and proclaim the good news of the Gospel - not just on Resurrection Sunday but every week as we gather as the body of Christ.

But it was this picture of Coptic Christians in Egypt pouring into churches on Easter Sunday that deeply moved my heart...just a week after two churches were bombed by ISIS terrorists taking 45 lives and injuring hundreds.

Even in the face of persecution and suffering, I'm so grateful for the witness of these sisters and brothers in Christ. May they be comforted and strengthened...and wherever you are reading this post, stay encouraged. Be faithful and steadfast. Don't give up. May we keep running the race set before us as we fix our eyes on Christ.

It's not just there. It's all over the world...God is still at work. The Holy Spirit is still moving. God is not yet done. There's only one explanation: 
Christ has risen! He has risen, indeed! Jesus is alive! Hallelujah! #OneChurch Remember, there is no Resurrection without the Crucifixion; No Easter Sunday without Passion Friday; No empty tomb without the Cross.

So, before we move too swiftly to the celebration of the risen Christ, may we sit at the foot of the Cross...and consider the depths of His sacrifice and love. "Oh, what love is this..." Just when we think we get what it means to follow Him, Jesus washes the feet of His disciples including...the one He knew would betray Him,

and the one that would deny him,

and the others that would abandon Him in His greatest need.

What amazing love.
What amazing grace. Oh. What. Amazing. Grace. M(inhee) + E(ugene). Not taking anything for granted. 20 years = 7300 days = 175,200 hours. A flourishing  marriage doesn't just happen. The idea that two Christians who choose to get married will produce a Christ honoring marriage is a gigantic myth. Its also extremely dangerous. The truth is that it takes so much intentionality and work. Intimacy definitely includes physical touch but is not only about physical touch. We have to pray, read, listen, learn, mutually submit, confess, forgive, repent, laugh, dream, rest, play, and the list goes on.

In other words, we have to keep Christ at the center because it's inevitable, there's a lot of messing up. So much messing up. It's both beautiful and painful and without grace, it's impossible.

Grateful. Thank you, Jesus, for your grace. And thank you, Minhee...

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