Eugene Cho

if [my daughter] had $100,000…

As Minhee and I work towards launching a humanitarian organization later this year [once the 501c3 is officially issued], we’ve been enjoying opportunities to speak to our children about why we’ve made the decision and how it will impact our family.  We share with our kids about our faith in Christ and our desire to be agents of mercy, justice, and humility – both locally and globally.   But in many ways, our children are the ones that often challenge us with their sense of compassion.

[During my current sabbatical, I’ll be reposting some old posts for your reading pleasure.]

My oldest daughter who’s in 4th grade had a homework assignment this week where she was asked to write an essay about how she would help others if she had $100,000.  What a coincidence since that’s the amount we’ve pledged.  Anyways, I read it on Sunday night and was floored.

Read her essay below and check out the “vision plan” that she drew out.  I’m so immensely proud and privileged to be a father to my three children.  Okay, so the amounts in the essay don’t exactly add up to 100K but you get the point!

copy-of-100kplan.jpg

If I had $100,000, I would send them to far away places.  I have learned about these places because my church has raised some money to Africa. 

I would like to give $500 to Uganda. $300 to India, $200 to Congo, $250 to Kenya and $150 to Sudan and $1,000 to Kyrgyzstan.  All the money is for schools in Uganda, India, Congo, Kenya and Sudan. I also like to help people, and animals. So I would give $400 to orphanages and $100 to build an animal shelter. I would donate $500 to let each orphan go to school and learn the same thing as other children.          

I want to help autistic children. Because I have a friend who need special help in public schools. I want to donate $300 to build a school for them. I also want to be a doctor. So I thought I could donate $200 to build a hospital in Kenya. I also thought of myself since I have a skin problem.  So do a lot of people in the world. There aren’t a lot of dermatologists in the world so I can donate $400 to build a dermatology hospital. I also truly want to help Whittier Elementary. So I want give $200 for the playground and $6,000 for supplies, school lunches and other things for Whittier.  

I also thought about Asia and especially for North Korea. My great grandparents and grandfather are from North Korea. There are so many people who don’t have food to eat.  So I want to give North Korea $200 to buy food and $50 to build a market because they do not have enough food. And I want to build a school that’s FREE in China. I also thought of the world we live in. So I want to donate $600 to plant trees and flowers. And the rest I want to give to families around the world that actually need money. The reason why I want to help all of these people, things and places is because I want to see more smiles on peoples’ faces.  I want the world to be a better place and I also want to see lots of happy kids.  I want to see many healthy and happy people all over the world!

Filed under: family, religion, ,

34 Responses

  1. J. P. says:

    i’m speechl…

  2. Ragamuffin280 says:

    That’s just awesome! Props to you on raising such a global-minded child.

  3. minna says:

    PE …
    my eyes welled up when i read your daughter’s essay. she is such a great witness! you and your wife really should be so proud to be a part of shaping her to be such an amazing little lady with such a heart for others! props, PE, props!!

  4. RyanBD says:

    Seriously, that’s a glimpse of why Jesus said “the Kingdom of Heaven belongs to such as these” in Mt. 19. Go little Cho, go.

  5. Teresa says:

    She sounds a lot like you and Minhee:) Nice job!

  6. andrew says:

    Often times, it is because of children that I find much hope about the future. Somehow, maybe they’ll be able to forgive us. Learn the positives that we’ve been able to show and move forward with greater courage and grace.

  7. yglin says:

    she gave $6,000 to her elementary school and $150-$1000 to 3rd world nations. she knows that $6,000 isn’t as valuable here in the US as $150-$1000 in developing countries. you have a young economist on your hands!

    -yung

  8. david says:

    inspiring and humbling all at the same time…maybe thats part of what He meant when He said to become like children…

  9. e cho says:

    yglin: that or her school is brainwashing her!

  10. Stef says:

    out of the mouths of babes…

  11. Deanne says:

    she’s pretty much awesome.

  12. YK Yea says:

    wow. very precious and thanks for sharing.

  13. Becky Eemo says:

    How incredibly beautiful. I am tears after reading this. What a beautiful, beautiful heart she has.

  14. Jonghee Jo says:

    Wow she has a beautiful heart. You and Minhee must have been wonderful parents to her! I’m so impressed.

  15. Jessica says:

    Now that’s a leader in the making!

  16. […] I read what Eugene Cho’s kid wanted to do with $100,000 (all of it altruistic, for those of you who don’t click through), it gave me a glimmer of […]

  17. Blake says:

    Wow, PE… She’s incredible. You sure you didn’t just post this so you could get affirmation on your obviously awesome parenting skills? 😉 jk.

  18. e cho says:

    i could pass for writing that. but for the drawing, i don’t have those skills.

    honestly, i really think that many of us as children think in these beautiful and ideal ways. the older we can, the more skeptical, cynical, and egotistical we can get.

    at least, that’s my story…

  19. tok cho says:

    I am so proud of being your grandparent.
    Great , juby

  20. JB says:

    Awesome! She’s got brains and heart. I’m completely confident that when the time comes she’ll find whatever other resources she needs to do great things.

  21. Dennis says:

    I can’t wait for her to start blogging like her dad… =)

  22. sarcasticredheadedgeek says:

    You have done a terrific job raising a great daughter!

  23. Donna says:

    Beautiful…that brought tears to my eyes. How blessed you both are to have such a daughter. God is so good.

  24. daphne says:

    What a kid!!!

  25. Will says:

    Bro. words don’t come close….

  26. Paul says:

    this post, like the last one where we couldn’t post anything (!!!), is about the heart. it’s about more than our treasures. jesus says where our treasures are there is our heart and its desires. don’t place the desires of your heart in earthly things where it will inevitably waste away. place our hearts in heavenly things. this precious girl’s heart is in the right place in my book! (an aside for church folk–when people give money, they’re actually being good stewards of their heart…not just their money.)

  27. rk says:

    pastor eugene, this is the best thing i’ve read in a long time! your girl just made me cry and i am going to talk share it in my blog!

  28. gar says:

    I like the mind-map. Good job to whatever teacher taught her the importance of pre-writing… haha. =)

  29. […] Eugene Cho has a nice letter his daughter wrote on what she would do with […]

  30. iy. says:

    that is amazing. i love that $50 goes to build a market in NK but $100 goes to animals and $600 to plant flowers and trees. i love that the numbers doesn’t make any sense! what an awesome essay. i hope her teacher is amazed and touched and laughs a lot. =)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on. I have to remind myself of this every day...because I can forget every day:

Don't be lazy and make assumptions about people. Ask about their story. Then listen. Be humble. Be teachable. Be human. Be a good neighbor. It's a sad reality but our society runs on the currency of fear. Don't feed into this frenzy.

Rather, invest in faith, hope, and love.

my tweets

JOIN ME ON FACEBOOK

advertisements

Blog Stats

  • 3,460,025 hits