Eugene Cho

the longest quickest year

Every time near the end of a particular year, I have the same thought:  “What in the world happened to the past year?”    This year is no different:  the past couple weeks, I’ve been “feeling” incredulous how quickly this year has passed. 

Bam.  And here it is…2008.  I was actually feeling a little down at the thought of how fast the year had passed.  But the more time I reflected upon this past year [especially while drafting up the family’s annual year in review letter], I found myself on the other spectrum: 

This has been a long year.  So much has gone on.  In fact, I can’t even believe some of the stuff that’s gone on this past year:  with myself, the family, church and ministry, and just life in general. 

I was reading this amazing post from Working the Angles where the author [Pat Loughery] reviewed his past year – month by month – and the lessons learned and goals shaped for the future.  It compelled me to glance over my blog entries and events of the past year.   In looking back, it’s helped me to gain perspective on the lessons learned but to also sense how God’s orchestrated His mercy and grace over my life. 

When we live day by day or week to week, I think it’s easy to wonder how fast time flies.  But as we look back – not just yesterday, but to the past month, and over the past year, we might all be amazed at how much life has taken place.  The tragedy might be when we let life simply pass by when it is there to be experienced.  I guess this might be called “the big picture.”

If you haven’t done so already, let me encourage you to take an hour to write down and reflect on what has transpired this past year in your life.  You might be surprised as I was.

Filed under: family, religion

7 Responses

  1. patlo says:

    Thanks for the link and the compliment, eugene! I went and busted my WP installation not long after I finished the blog entry, but I’ll try to fix it tomorrow.

    I’m happy that my little review turned into your excellent suggestion to your readers to reflect. It was very fruitful for me to do; I pray that it is for your readers.

  2. Randall says:

    When I was in Hawaii, I used to drive out to Sandy Beach on the east coast of Oahu to watch the sun rise out of the ocean on New Year’s morning, usually by myself. I’d sit at the beach and flip through my old journals. I’d reminisce and reflect. I love New Year’s, it’s by far my favorite time of year – how everything feels fresh and new, how I’m reminded of all the possibilities that are out there in life.

    I don’t know how many people do this (not the watching the sunrise bit but the reflecting bit) but I highly recommend it. Ferris Bueller was right. “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you might miss something.”

  3. Pat says:

    I love Randall’s suggestion too. i wish I journaled more frequently. One of my most treasured possessions is the set of my dad’s journals – I can trace him from his conversion experience when I was 14, through his growth and battle of cancer, to his death when i was 24. it’s a truly heart-wrenching and heart-filling expierience.

  4. Linda says:

    I know it’s not the point of your comment, Randall, but that sounds really romantic. I guess any description of Hawaii would come out that way. What a great atmosphere for reflecting and reminiscing!

    I’ve been doing my reminiscing during rush hour commutes. I reflect fairly often, which helps me be thankful and embrace the changes in myself and my life. This time last year, I was in Arizona in the middle of my residency. Year before that I was getting ready to go into internships in Chicago. Before that, I was a half-crazed grad student in Iowa. Now I’m a certified independent clinician in Seattle. Every year, I feel like I’ve moved up a step in maturity and personal growth; my world view and perspective of human existance expanded that much more.

  5. Daniel says:

    I share your sentiment how time can go by both fast and yet, so slow. Thanks for sharing your thoughts via this blog. I stumbled unto it this past year and it’s been a regular read for me since then.

  6. JChang says:

    Eugene,

    Appreciate the good post here. Also thought Pat’s comment was good:

    “One of my most treasured possessions is the set of my dad’s journals – I can trace him from his conversion experience when I was 14, through his growth and battle of cancer, to his death when i was 24. it’s a truly heart-wrenching and heart-filling expierience”

    Never thought about journaling in a way that allows my own children to understand the ups and downs I’ve been through after I’m gone. Thanks.

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She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

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She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
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