Eugene Cho

racism and immigration

I need to show some love for the work at Washington Post as well [h/t NextGenerasian].  Two reporters, Annabel Park [1.5 gen. Korean immigrant] and Eric Byler, went to Prince William County in Virginia to report on their rising tension over immigration [racism]:

How did Prince William County, one of the richest, most diverse counties in the nation, become a flashpoint in America’s battle over immigration? What led to threats of racial violence during public meetings and grown men screaming at children on the streets? And how did a team of Asian American documentary filmmakers end up in the middle, with both pro-immigration and anti-immigration forces demanding that they take sides?

On Oct. 9, Eric Byler and Annabel Park began posting short video clips on a YouTube channel they created called “9500Liberty” at http://www.youtube.com/9500Liberty. The “interactive documentary” project took its name from a street address in Old Town Manassas where a sign had been posted, reading: “Prince William Co. Stop Your Racism to Hispanics!” The sign — on what was known as “Liberty Wall” — protested a county policy that requires police to check immigration status during routine traffic stops and denies some services to undocumented immigrants. The county, like many places across the nation, is in the middle of a demographic transformation: Since 1990, its Hispanic population has quadrupled; today one in five of the county’s 360,000 residents is Hispanic; and the number of Asians has more than doubled.

I have no scathing response to their “discoveries” or the video posted below.  It doesn’t surprise me at all.  Been there…and still there.  While America is an incredible country, it still has much to grow.  In many ways, it doesn’t matter who I am, what I’ve accomplished, where I’ve studied, or what I do.  To the eyes of some or manhy, I am an Asian and thus, not American.  I don’t look American [meaning I don’t look White] and thus, I am not American – even if I am a US Citizen and a proud Korean-American.

Take a look at the video.  It’s 9 minutes long but worth checking out in light of the immigration issue being such a hot issue.  I don’t pretend to have the answers to the immigration debate but would love to hear some of your thoughts.  In the video, listen carefully to when Annabel Park talks about “identity crisis.” 

My family and I immigrated to San Francisco when I was six years old.  It has been such a significant part of my life that it intricately shapes my worldview.  There isn’t a day that goes by that I don’t think of myself as the “other” – or reminded as such.  As a Christian, I am thankful that my identity, ultimately, isn’t rooted in earthly realms but rather as a follower of Jesus.  And furthermore, as a follower of Jesus, I am that more compelled to have a commitment to the “others” around me.

Filed under: politics, religion, ,

11 Responses

  1. DK says:

    That video makes me pretty upset. But doesn’t surprise me at all but am concerned how some in the video equate immgrant to illegal immigrants.

  2. joanne says:

    anchor babies? wow…

  3. Matt EHH says:

    The Concepts of America are striking. When you have the concept of a government “founded” on principles, of equality among peoples, regardless of race, gender, creed, or culture And you mix in the concept of a nation made up of immigrants, whether it was 1 generation ago or 6, you have the perception of a free nation, who is fundamentally open to immigrants and will not fundamentally exclude any would-be participants based on prejudice. These are the concepts that have drawn in immigrants, from the Mayflower to the present.

    But Identity is a totally different dimension altogether. American Identity is very often, if not almost always, based on the very things American Concepts supposedly transcend. I’ve found at the heart of most citizens, its not “one nation…indivisible…with liberty and justice for all”, but its about culture, families, language, skin tone, and economics that define us.

    In the globally-connected environment of 2008, the American Concepts are still writing checks that the American Identity doesn’t want to cash. With life expectancy increasing around the world, but still the non mortal effects of poverty still forcing people to consider leaving their homes for a “better promise”, the US and other nations, will continue to face this, as more people come announced and unannounced.

    I think the American Identity has been holding down the fort for the last 200 years, but the American Concepts seem to be coming back with a vengence now.

  4. Hi Eugene,

    I have been living in this country for the last six years, I personally haven’s experience racism but I have seen how people treat the immigrants. When watching the video, the only thing I could do was to cry. I cried for people’s heart. Yesterday we get together celebrating “the posadas” a traditional holiday in the Mexican Culture. But this posada was unique because there were not only Hispanic, but American, not only Latin but African-American. The walls were broken because everybody there was able to get to know the persona who was beside them. If they were just willing to seat down with them and listen to their stories, to their hearts; if they were just willing to feel their pain and frustration; if we could just dream with them….if’s without answers….Gracias, thank you for this post…

  5. Kacie says:

    Grrrrr this just makes my blood boil. I had the privalege of watching the immigration reform march in Chicago in ’06, and there are very few things that I am as passionately opinionated about as immigration in the US. I am just EMBARASSED by my fellow white American’s attitudes sometimes! As a third culture kid that grew up overseas as an American citizen, I’m called a hidden immigrant. My skin, my family, and my language create the illusion of me “fitting in” to the majority. I had the benefit of being able to “hide”, in a way that most immigrants never can. I still felt incredibly isolated and different, though, and as soon as the hubby is done with grad school I hope to leave the country. There’s very little patriotism left in me, nor do I feel like an American.

    Annabelle is incredibly gracious and insightful. I wonder if she is a Christian. She acts like on.

  6. Brent says:

    I stumbled unto this blog via WordPress. Interesting thoughts but I think most of you don’t have a clue what you are talking about? Kacie: What exactly are you talking about? What are you embarrassed about? The proposals for immigration reform isn’t to simply protect White Americans, it is to protect America. We have no idea who is livinng within our own country. Imagine if you had people living in your own and you had no idea who they were? Imagine if you only had space for a certain number of people but people kept still inviting others to live with them in your home?

  7. Mrs.K. says:

    Although I grew up in the Seattle area and am a born caucasion American, I have had the privilege of living in Canada for almost four years now. The culture here seems to be so much more inviting to other cultures. I believe that when someone becomes an American or Canadian citizen (or a citizen of any other country, for that matter), they have obvious responsibilites to that country, but in no way does that have to mean giving up the culture or lifestyle of their country of birth. How many of us who are sixth generation Americans (or seventh or whatever) still hold on to vestiges of our Eurpean culture and just call it “American”? There is very little original American culture in reality, most of it comes from where we came from. I can certainly see that if immigrants are breaking the law based on too many people living in one house or raising livestock on land not zoned for it, they are breaking the law and there should be a consequence. But how many white people regularly break the law and get away with it? How often does our government fail us when it comes to caring for the poor and helping them out of the slump? It’s frightening to see that there are people whose ancestors were immigrants being so cold and uninviting to new immigrants. To be honest, I think it has everything to do with a comfort zone that white Americans are often unwilling to give up. When they hear the person in line in front of them at the grocery store laughing and speaking Spanish or Korean or whatever, they worry that they are being laughed at or talked about. Thus, they shout (or write on posters) “This is America: speak English!” I think it interferes with their desire to eavesdrop (I know I’ve done my share of wondering before what someone else is talking about -whether it be the Asian students who come here to study or the Mennonite women whose families have been here for many many years but who still speak low-German). My question to the man at the fence who is yelling at the film makers and those with them about speaking English is this: Are you willing to help them learn English? Here in the northern parts of British Columbia, we get a good number of Japanese, Korean and Chinese students coming to study. Once a week for most of the year, we meet with some of them (whoever wants to come) at our church and play games that will improve their skills in using the English language. The easiest way to learn it is to immerse yourself in the culture. If immigrants (or students who come to study) are continually excluded from normal “American life”, how will they learn? And how many of us, if we moved somewhere foreign, would still speak English in our homes if it was our first language? I have heard of many Americans going to visit other countries and getting mad when people can’t speak English there. What is that all about? Again, it’s a comfort zone and indicates to me that they are too lazy to make the effort to learn a few words of conversational German, Spanish, Korean, etc.
    For anyone to whom these words seem offensive – fine! I’m a white girl born and raised with people around me who were very frequently prejudiced against people of other colours or looks and at some point, I just grew up. If the US wants to make immigration impossible or difficult, fine. But as long as it works the way it does, people should make every effort to make those immigrants comfortable and help them to adjust to a different way of living. I don’t think illegal immigrants should be overlooked by the law, but those who have a right to be in the country should be looked upon with love.

    Thanks for the video post, Pastor.

  8. Kacie says:

    Brent –
    I am embarassed when people are rude or dismissive of people from other cultures. I am embarassed when my friends who are American citizens are treated badly because people assume they are immigrants. I’m embarassed when we are xenophobic or ignorant of other cultures.

    I am all for knowing who lives in your borders, and I agree that people should not come here illegally.

    I disagree, however, that we are running out of room. This country is not in the least overpopulated, we have plenty of space… we’re #144 on the list of countries by population density (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_population_density). Europe is much more highly populated then we are.

  9. Brent says:

    Kacie,

    Ok, that’s fair – to an extent. Those things take place not just with White Americans but across the board. People simply can be mean spirited and rude. And as for our link from wikipedia, that’s irrelavant. Immigrants aren’t crossing borders or coming into the country to live on hte plains in South Dakota. They mostly go to to cities of high density and consequently, adding strain to the infrastructure.

  10. gar says:

    Great link & video, pastor.

    My heart goes out to my Latino/Latina brothers and sisters who have deal the BS anti-immigrant, racist hysteria that goes on these days. In a sad way, it’s eerily similarly to the same hysteria faced by Chinese Americans during the late 19th century (Chinese Exclusion Act, anyone?).

    I’m reminded of one of my favorite verses from Scripture:

    “Administer true justice; show mercy and compassion to one another. Do not oppress the widow or the fatherless, the immigrant or the poor. In your hearts do not think evil of each other.” -Zechariah 7:9-10

  11. Thank you so much for linking to this video. It reminds me to “ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” I am trying to be a good influence on my family members and those around me. We have so much more progress to make in the way that we interact with one another in America. I’ve been meaning to comment here for some time, but I’ve not done so until now. You have a beautiful blog.

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One Day’s Wages

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Checking out Canada in case I need to move up North after the presidential election. Just saying, eh.

Downtown Toronto. Fascinating architecture. Amazed by the diversity of this city. We desperately want our children to not just be captivated by the beauty of creation...but more importantly, to the actual Creator of all that is good and beautiful.

Actually, we want and need this truth for our souls, too. What a privilege. This isn't possible without all those who give, pray, and support the work of @onedayswages. This week, I signed and mailed grants to three partner organizations totaling over $170,000. These grants will empower people by supporting maternal health care, refugee relief efforts, access to clean water, provide education, etc.

Sometimes, the brokenness of the world feel so overwhelming but let's keep running the race with endurance. Let's keep pursuing justice, mercy, and humility. Let's be faithful and may we be spurred on to keep working for God's Kingdom...on earth as it is in heaven.

Again, thank you so much for your support for @onedayswages! My wife, Minhee, and I stand on the shoulders of praying mothers. I'd like to take a moment to honor my mother-in-law. It's hard to put words together to embody her life but she is a very special, anointed person. I'm so blessed to have her as a mother in my life.

She was a devoted wife until she lost her husband to cancer, mother to three daughters, and later became a pastor. She became a follower of Christ as an adult and as such, led her her family to Christ. In her late 50s, she obeyed God's calling to go to seminary and be a leader in the church. She graduated #1 in her class and reminded us that it's never too late to follow a new dream or calling.

As she'll soon celebrate her 80th birthday, I'm especially grateful for the ways that she poured into and prayed over Minhee and her other children.  Even though she's officially retired, I'm inspired that the concept of retirement is not in her vocabulary.  She continues to serve the local church, evangelize and bear witness to Christ, and goes to the early morning prayer meeting at 5am everyday to pray for our family, our church, and for others. 
Jangmonim, we love and honor you. 어머니, 사랑합니다.

Someday, I hope that when my kids speak of Minhee and I...above all, they would say with integrity that their parents prayed for them and kept pointing them to Christ. On this Mother's Day, I want to take a few words to honor mother.

There’s a moment from a few years ago that will stick with me until the day I die. It’s regarding Sung Wha, my mother.

Minhee and I were at a point of transition, between working at an ethnic Korean church in the northern suburbs of Seattle called Lynnwood and launching Quest in urban Seattle. As I shared earlier, I was in desperate need of a job. I had a mortgage to pay. A pregnant wife. A kid at home. 
Then, praise God, after months without work, I finally landed a job.

My mom was in between jobs at this point in her life. She was in her late fifties, but she had such bad knees and degenerative hips that it was, and is, difficult for her to walk. My mom is like a human barometer—when a storm is coming and when it rains, her hips throb. Although my parents lived in San Francisco, she was visiting us in Seattle to encourage us in this difficult season.

As I prepared to go to work one early morning, I walked downstairs to put on my jacket and shoes, and forgot that my mother woke up early every morning to pray. In fact, she had been praying for months that I would find a job. “Eugene, where are you going?” she said when she saw me.

I hadn’t told my mother the news that I had just recently been hired for the janitorial gig at Barnes and Noble. I chose not to because I thought she and my father would be devastated. I didn’t want them to think that after laboring, sacrificing, and doing so much for us over all those years that their son had failed them.

But I couldn’t lie to her, so eventually I told my mom that I got a job and was going to work. “Great! What job? What are you doing?” “Um, I’m working at Barnes and Noble as their custodian,” I said finally.

Without asking another question, my mother got up from the dining table where she had been reading her Bible and praying. She slowly walked slowly toward me.

She approached me, then walked past me without saying a word, and I realized she was headed toward the closet. She opened the closet door, put on her jacket, turned around and said to me (in Korean), “Eugene, let’s go together. I will help you.” This is my mother. I love all the free amazing views in our Evergreen State. #RattlesnakeLedge

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