Eugene Cho

what a world

Consider how fast our world is changing.  The world I wake up to the next morning will be different than this day.  The world is changing so fast.  I think about the first time I used something called electronic mail 10 years ago.  It was so new and scary…

But to demonstrate how much the world has changed, consider my children:

  • My 8 year old daughter is upset that I didn’t buy a Prius.  She learned about hybrids and environmental issues in school and knows of other friends whose parents drive a hybrid.  I embarrass her.
  • My 6 year old daughter checks her email daily now – even though she rarely gets new email.
  • My wife and 4 year old son flew out to San Francisco couple days ago.  As my four year old son hugs me goodbye, he says to me, “Dad, I’ll miss you.  I’ll Skype you.”

What the heck?  Can you imagine how much our world will change for our children’s children? 

I thought I was so cool with my Atari 2600, Sony Walkman, and Commodore 64.  I think I still have my walkman somewhere.

What do you miss?  Or rather, what do you fondly remember?

Filed under: family, technology

14 Responses

  1. nancy says:

    too funny,

    i miss the old polaroid cameras.

  2. Kim Aliczi says:

    I wouldn’t say I “miss” them – but I fondly remember my dad coming home one day with one of the very first calcultors – it performed only basic functions, and cost somewhere in the neighborhood of $30.00 – a FORTUNE back then!

    I do miss the early days of being in business with my husband, we had a small but growing sound and lighting company. Our first company comuputer had a whopping 10 mB of RAM and took 5-14″ floppies. Sigh…memories!

  3. Wayne Park says:

    Great American Hero and Voltron

  4. Jerry says:

    I miss going to the movies for $1.50. This was in the early 80s.

  5. insipid "g" says:

    I am JUST waiting to bust out my tapered stone-wash jeans!!! Yeah!!!

  6. mszig says:

    I remember rotary dial phones, record players, tape recorders and the purple mimeograph papers we would get at school…. those really stunk!

  7. “My 8 year old daughter is upset that I didn’t buy a Prius. She learned about hybrids and environmental issues in school and knows of other friends whose parents drive a hybrid. I embarrass her.”

    Don’t feel too bad. If she only knew the kind of environmental damage done by the car batteries when they are disposed of she wouldn’t be that upset. Not to mention that those hybrid batteries are thus far prone to dying and need to be replace every 3-5 years- if you’re lucky.

  8. Todd Kim says:

    Star Blazers when I was 6-7 years old, Redline dirt bikes when I was 9 and Toyota MR2 & Honda CRX when I was 14 years old… oh yeah… Keds in middle school

  9. Paulas says:

    Hi, Cho!

    Yah, Yah, its changing a lot. I always think about this. right now I am a single guy and still I think what will happen when my kids will be growing like me? when they start heaving a children, our ideas and views will be very traditional to them and may not relate to their current context. they will accuse us , ” my dad is kind of narrow minded, and very traditional, he just doesn’t understand us.” … as some times we say it now to our parent’s generation.

    I am very interested to know how the world will be changed. and also praying for the Lord’s mercies upon the generation to come.

  10. Tracy says:

    I miss receiving personal letters in the mail. Something about them meant “soul”/”heart”.

  11. Joseon says:

    I miss rap songs with records getting scratched.

  12. Blake says:

    I echo Tracy’s sentiment about postal mail. Sure, email is amazing and handy, but I really miss getting letters writen by hand on carefully chosen paper. 🙂 Sigh, those were the days.

    I miss high-tops with three pairs of neon colored laces! That was hot stuff. I also miss Ducktails, Goof Troop, Darkwing Duck, Rescue Rangers, and Home Improvement. 🙂

  13. Blake says:

    Oh yeah, I totally forgot:

    – Monkey Bars (don’t see these much anymore)
    – Sand boxes
    – Doing “Cherry Bombs” on a swing set
    – Teeter-totters
    – Playgrounds built with the purpose of kids having fun as their primary objective, even if they got hurt occasionally. Too many modern playgrounds seem to be designed for safety at the significant expense of creative fun.

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She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

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200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
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