Eugene Cho

pastoral paradox

Death and Life?  It doesn’t surprise me to read statistics that one might view as contradicting statements.  There are ample stats that testify to the “dangers” of being a pastor.  On the other hand, a recent article reports that according to surveys, clergy report the highest level of satisfaction.  Huh?  Both statistics actually make complete sense to me

According to that survey, the top five professions are clergy, physical therapists, firefighters, education administrators, and painters/sculptors:

Clergy ranked by far the most satisfied and the most generally happy of 198 occupations.

Eighty-seven percent of clergy said they were “very satisfied” with their work, compared with an average 47 percent for all workers. Sixty-seven percent reported being “very happy,” compared with an average 33 percent for all workers.

Jackson Carroll, Williams professor emeritus of religion and society at Duke Divinity School, found similarly high satisfaction when he studied Protestant and Catholic clergy, despite relatively modest salaries and long hours.

“They look at their occupation as a calling,” Carroll said. “A pastor does get called on to enter into some of the deepest moments of a person’s life, celebrating a birth and sitting with people at times of illness or death. There’s a lot of fulfillment.” [read the entire article]

So, while pastoral ministry is at times exhausting, draining, depressing, and overwhelming, it’s also meaningful and fulfilling.  This past Sunday, our church family and pastors had the joyous privilege of encouraging, praying, and baptizing several people.  Each of their stories blessed me in unique ways.  Here, I’d like to share a portion of “Rachel’s” story:

My faith in God is nothing of my own doing. I am probably the chief saboteur of my own relationship with the Lord Christ. Rather than upholding pillars of a cathedral around my heart, which is St. Teresa of Avila’s beautiful analogy of our soulish vessel for the Holy Spirit, I’d say most days I struggle to keep a cardboard cover. I get blown around a lot, by the elements, by other people’s opinions of me and of the universe, by the un-ignorable state of injustice that is worse than a multi-drug resistant infection.  

I came to know Christ through a few individuals who took notice of my awkward struggle to construct an identity all my own. They say true friends are the people to whom you can say the things you’d rather not have to say, and they are those who tell you things you’d rather not have to hear. I’ve been unexpectedly blessed by angels who came out of the woodwork to walk with me through some dark times, and those conversations tell the true story of my faith. But like John said, “if every one were written down, the whole world would not have the room for the books that would be written.” 

My own stubbornness and arrogance are to blame for those dark nights of the soul. Loneliness is a bitch. By my sophomore year at SPU, I had pretty much encapsulated myself into a cocoon of pain—not of growth—more like an isolated tomb that still managed to smile away others’ concern. A dear professor of mine saw through the veneer, and pulled me aside more than once to minister to my hurting. He shared that on the day of his own conversion, a professor told him, “I am glad you are feeling this pain. You need to feel it some more.”  So I did, and it was a refining fire kind of good in my life.  I am a scientist, I am a philosopher, I am a comic, a cynic, I am a leader, a face on campus, and a very ugly sinner. These identities have made it very hard to accept the message of the cross, to truly believe that on top of all that schlock, I am also beloved, forgiven, and worth the sacrifice of death to be fully reconciled. I will profess as a living paradox who is tormented by the mystery of God’s salvation that only Jesus is freedom.  [read her entire story]

So, while pastoral ministry can be @*#$@…what a blessing.  May you also be engaged – not in a perfect job [since we know it doesn’t exist] but one that gives you pleasure, purpose and meaning – so that ultimately, you may honor God.  Sola Dei Gloria.

Question: Are you currently engaged in something that gives you pleasure, purpose, and meaning?  If not, what would that be?

baptism.jpg

Filed under: church, emerging church, ministry, religion

6 Responses

  1. Karen says:

    For me, it’s not one set thing. I just want to always be around people and reflect Christ and his grace somehow.

  2. LK. says:

    In being an artist, there is little return and recognition (unless you get really lucky and your name is Picasso). The hours are long, pay is virtually non-existent, and there is a lot of time spent in isolation. There is also a lot of misunderstanding, self-doubt, and lonliness, because sometimes none or very few people understand and validate you, and often times, an artist’s sense of worth is heavily constructed by the feedback and approval of other’s. Often times it feels like your efforts are going nowhere, and sometimes you wonder if it’s all really worth it.
    But when you feel convicted by Jesus with passionate vision, all the things above seem so meaningless in comparison. Feeling a sense of calling brings and keeps you so deeply connected to life and God, and true meaning is found in something greater than yourself. Even when the fruit of your labor seems invisible in our linear minds, there is reward in knowing that there is a larger picture in which God knows what he’s doing, and you are blessed to be an agent of it.

  3. Dan K. says:

    The problem, Pastor Eugene, is I don’t have a clue and I just want to find out what I’m passionate about.

  4. Blake says:

    I’m in similar boat as Dan. I know that I have passions, (People, Flying, Loving, etc.) but finding some work/avocation to be passionate about is my current challenge.

  5. Teresa says:

    At World Aid, our mission is “to give hope to the oppressed.” I am passionate about that mission, but the part God gave me to play, is very small-I’m a bookkeeper. What’s to be passionate about? My mission is to help get resources to people who actually get to be face to face with those who need the hope, need the medical care, and need the food, and need what folks who send in their checks here help to provide. Every time I do my bookkeeper thing, I get to give thanks to God for every one of the folks here who get to play a part in giving what they had, in caring, in using their skills to help feed the hungry, and encourage those in need on the other side of the world. I get to see the good in people and that while none of us can fix everything in some of the ugly places in the world, if we all do what God gives us to do, we can do SOMETHING. I pray for those who send resources, and I give thanks each week that even bookkeepers can use their skills for serving God.

  6. e cho says:

    thanks teresa for sharing that.

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One Day’s Wages

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"He must become greater; I must become less." - John 3:30 We have to remind ourselves of this truth every day lest we forget:

Our greatest calling as followers of Christ is to be faithful. Not spectacular. Not glamorous. Not popular. Not relevant.

Be faithful.

PS: Also, it helps to get some Vitamin D especially if you live in the rainy Northwest Thank you, Brooklyn, for the reminder. Umm, @jlin7 is a Christian but he wasn't very Christlike with me on the basketball court. He muscled me into the paint, dunked on me, mentioned my momma, and then said, "Stick with preaching." Just kidding. Kind of.

If you haven't heard, Jeremy Lin is donating his one games wages (approximately $140,000) and an additional $100 for every 3 pointer made to support Girls' Empowerment and Education through @onedayswages. That game is this Friday vs the Boston Celtics!

Join his campaign as he's inviting his fans to donate just $7. - http://onedayswages.org/jlin

Did you know that 32 million girls of lower secondary school age are not enrolled in school.

Did you know that every year of secondary school increases a girl’s future earning power by 20 percent.

Did you know that if all girls in Sub-Saharan Africa, South and West Asia had a secondary education, child marriage would fall by 64 percent.

We can't change the entire world but we can impact the lives of one, few, and in some cases...many.

#jeremylin #jlin #linsanity #onedayswages Don't be held captive to either praise or criticism.

Know who you are.
Know what you're about.
Know WHO you serve.

The answer to who you serve makes all the difference... It's the day after International Women's Day - and it's still important to celebrate the contribution of women in our lives, society, and world. As we honor women all around the world, I'm also reminded of how women and children are those who are most deeply impacted by injustice - especially poverty.

Sadly, I have witnessed this reality in too many places. ​In 2012, I traveled to a remote area in Eastern Kenya as part of a @onedayswages response to a famine that struck the Horn of Africa region. This famine impacted nearly 13 million people and according to some sources, took the lives of about 250,000 people. During my trip there, I had the chance of meeting many people but the person that still remains in my memory was a Muslim woman named Sahara.

She was so hospitable in inviting us to her small and temporary home. During our conversation, I learned that ​Sahara traveled 300 kilometers (a little under 200 miles) – some by cart and some by foot – as they sought to escape the worst drought that has impacted East Africa (Kenya, Somalia, and Ethiopia) in the past 60 years.

This is not a misprint.
200.

She traveled about 200 miles on cart and foot. ​And all along, she was ill. If you look closely ​at the photo, you might notice the large lump in her throat - likely a large cancerous tumor.​ She did not travel alone. She traveled with her husband who I was not able to meet because he was staying with one of his five other wives in this polygamist community.  She did not travel alone. She also traveled with her six children – the youngest being about 1 and the oldest being around 8. She had just given birth to her sixth child when they began her journey. Her youngest was severely malnourished when they arrived to this new settlement in a town called Benane. 
Sahara and her children all survived this journey. They survived because she persisted. 
In honor of Sahara...and so many other women who keep...keeping on.

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