Eugene Cho

pastoral paradox

Death and Life?  It doesn’t surprise me to read statistics that one might view as contradicting statements.  There are ample stats that testify to the “dangers” of being a pastor.  On the other hand, a recent article reports that according to surveys, clergy report the highest level of satisfaction.  Huh?  Both statistics actually make complete sense to me

According to that survey, the top five professions are clergy, physical therapists, firefighters, education administrators, and painters/sculptors:

Clergy ranked by far the most satisfied and the most generally happy of 198 occupations.

Eighty-seven percent of clergy said they were “very satisfied” with their work, compared with an average 47 percent for all workers. Sixty-seven percent reported being “very happy,” compared with an average 33 percent for all workers.

Jackson Carroll, Williams professor emeritus of religion and society at Duke Divinity School, found similarly high satisfaction when he studied Protestant and Catholic clergy, despite relatively modest salaries and long hours.

“They look at their occupation as a calling,” Carroll said. “A pastor does get called on to enter into some of the deepest moments of a person’s life, celebrating a birth and sitting with people at times of illness or death. There’s a lot of fulfillment.” [read the entire article]

So, while pastoral ministry is at times exhausting, draining, depressing, and overwhelming, it’s also meaningful and fulfilling.  This past Sunday, our church family and pastors had the joyous privilege of encouraging, praying, and baptizing several people.  Each of their stories blessed me in unique ways.  Here, I’d like to share a portion of “Rachel’s” story:

My faith in God is nothing of my own doing. I am probably the chief saboteur of my own relationship with the Lord Christ. Rather than upholding pillars of a cathedral around my heart, which is St. Teresa of Avila’s beautiful analogy of our soulish vessel for the Holy Spirit, I’d say most days I struggle to keep a cardboard cover. I get blown around a lot, by the elements, by other people’s opinions of me and of the universe, by the un-ignorable state of injustice that is worse than a multi-drug resistant infection.  

I came to know Christ through a few individuals who took notice of my awkward struggle to construct an identity all my own. They say true friends are the people to whom you can say the things you’d rather not have to say, and they are those who tell you things you’d rather not have to hear. I’ve been unexpectedly blessed by angels who came out of the woodwork to walk with me through some dark times, and those conversations tell the true story of my faith. But like John said, “if every one were written down, the whole world would not have the room for the books that would be written.” 

My own stubbornness and arrogance are to blame for those dark nights of the soul. Loneliness is a bitch. By my sophomore year at SPU, I had pretty much encapsulated myself into a cocoon of pain—not of growth—more like an isolated tomb that still managed to smile away others’ concern. A dear professor of mine saw through the veneer, and pulled me aside more than once to minister to my hurting. He shared that on the day of his own conversion, a professor told him, “I am glad you are feeling this pain. You need to feel it some more.”  So I did, and it was a refining fire kind of good in my life.  I am a scientist, I am a philosopher, I am a comic, a cynic, I am a leader, a face on campus, and a very ugly sinner. These identities have made it very hard to accept the message of the cross, to truly believe that on top of all that schlock, I am also beloved, forgiven, and worth the sacrifice of death to be fully reconciled. I will profess as a living paradox who is tormented by the mystery of God’s salvation that only Jesus is freedom.  [read her entire story]

So, while pastoral ministry can be @*#$@…what a blessing.  May you also be engaged – not in a perfect job [since we know it doesn’t exist] but one that gives you pleasure, purpose and meaning – so that ultimately, you may honor God.  Sola Dei Gloria.

Question: Are you currently engaged in something that gives you pleasure, purpose, and meaning?  If not, what would that be?

baptism.jpg

Filed under: church, emerging church, ministry, religion

6 Responses

  1. Karen says:

    For me, it’s not one set thing. I just want to always be around people and reflect Christ and his grace somehow.

  2. LK. says:

    In being an artist, there is little return and recognition (unless you get really lucky and your name is Picasso). The hours are long, pay is virtually non-existent, and there is a lot of time spent in isolation. There is also a lot of misunderstanding, self-doubt, and lonliness, because sometimes none or very few people understand and validate you, and often times, an artist’s sense of worth is heavily constructed by the feedback and approval of other’s. Often times it feels like your efforts are going nowhere, and sometimes you wonder if it’s all really worth it.
    But when you feel convicted by Jesus with passionate vision, all the things above seem so meaningless in comparison. Feeling a sense of calling brings and keeps you so deeply connected to life and God, and true meaning is found in something greater than yourself. Even when the fruit of your labor seems invisible in our linear minds, there is reward in knowing that there is a larger picture in which God knows what he’s doing, and you are blessed to be an agent of it.

  3. Dan K. says:

    The problem, Pastor Eugene, is I don’t have a clue and I just want to find out what I’m passionate about.

  4. Blake says:

    I’m in similar boat as Dan. I know that I have passions, (People, Flying, Loving, etc.) but finding some work/avocation to be passionate about is my current challenge.

  5. Teresa says:

    At World Aid, our mission is “to give hope to the oppressed.” I am passionate about that mission, but the part God gave me to play, is very small-I’m a bookkeeper. What’s to be passionate about? My mission is to help get resources to people who actually get to be face to face with those who need the hope, need the medical care, and need the food, and need what folks who send in their checks here help to provide. Every time I do my bookkeeper thing, I get to give thanks to God for every one of the folks here who get to play a part in giving what they had, in caring, in using their skills to help feed the hungry, and encourage those in need on the other side of the world. I get to see the good in people and that while none of us can fix everything in some of the ugly places in the world, if we all do what God gives us to do, we can do SOMETHING. I pray for those who send resources, and I give thanks each week that even bookkeepers can use their skills for serving God.

  6. e cho says:

    thanks teresa for sharing that.

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One Day’s Wages

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As I soaked in this breathtaking sunrise this morning above the clouds, I felt compelled to pray for so my places in America and around the world that are experiencing such pain, heartache, injustice, and violence. At times, it feels so overwhelming but in prayer, I was reminded of these words from John 16:33. As we keep striving, working, hoping, preaching, loving, truthtelling, reconciling, repenting, forgiving, dismantling, peacemaking, Kingdom building...may we fix our eyes on Christ: “I have told you these things, so that in me you may have peace. In this world you will have trouble. But take heart! I have overcome the world.” - John 16:33 Grateful for a very full weekend of ministry and preaching in Toronto, Canada (GTA). Such a privilege to partner with @worldvisioncan @wvcollective to advocate for the most vulnerable around the world. God is so gracious. A true honor to meet and encourage local pastors, lecture at Tyndale University & Seminary (photo), and preach at Richmond Hills Community Church, Compass Point Bible Church, and New City Church. Thank you, Lord, that you use broken and imperfect people like me to speak of Your love. Today, Minhee and I dropped off our eldest child at her college. We have been thinking and praying about this day for many years. On some days, we hoped it would never come. On other days, we couldn't wait for it to come. On some days, we prayed for time to stop and other days, we prayed with anticipation. 
After an entire summer of laughing it off, it hit us...hard...this week. Seeing all of her stuff laid out on the basement floor was the catalyst to a load of emotions.

After unloading the car and taking her stuff to her new home for this year and mindful that she might never live with us again; helping sort out her stuff, saying hello to her roommates...I wasn't sure what to do or say.

A flood of thoughts rushed my mind.

Is she ready?
Have we done enough?
Have we taught her enough? 
What if this? What if that?

And so we shared what we have shared with her the moment she began to understand words: "Remember who you are. Remember WHO you belong to. Remember what you're about. God loves you so much. Please hold God's Word and His promises close and dear to your heart. We love you so much and we are so proud of you." And with that, we said goodbye. Even if she may not be thousands of miles away, this is a new chapter for her and even for us. I kept it composed. Her roommate was staring at me. I didn't want to be that father. I have street cred to uphold. Another final hug. 
And I came home.
And I wept.
Forget my street cred.
I miss her. I love her.
She will always be my little baby.

I'm no parenting guru. I just laughed as I wrote that line. No, I'm stumbling and bumbling along but I'd love to share an ephiphany I learned not that long ago. Coming to this realization was incredibly painful but simultaneously, liberating. To be honest, it was the ultimate game-changer in my understanding as a parent seeking after the heart of God.

While there are many methods, tools, philosophies, and biblical principles to parenting, there is – in my opinion – only one purpose or destination.

Our purpose as parents is to eventually…release them. Send forth. For His glory. Met a friend and fellow pastor who I haven't seen in over 20 years. In him, I saw a glimpse of my future. While only 10 years older, his kids are married and he's now a grandfather of 3. His love for his wife and family were so evident and his passion for the Gospel has not wavered. It was so good to see someone a bit older still passionately serving the Lord with such joy and faithfulness. Lord, help me to keep running the race for your Glory. Happy wife.
Happy life. - Eugenius 3:16

I still remember that time, many years ago, when Minhee was pregnant with our first child. She had left her family and friends in Korea just two years before. Her morning sickness was horrible and when she finally had an appetite, she craved her favorite Korean food from certain restaurants in her neighborhood in Seoul, Korea. I had no way of getting that food from those restaurants so I actually said, "How about a Whopper? Big Mac?" Sorry honey. Eat away. You deserve it. I don't care if it sounds mushy but sunsets are one of my love languages. Seoul, Korea was amazing but WOW...what a breathtaking welcome back sunset by Seattle. Not ready to let go of summer.

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