Eugene Cho

many still w/o power in seattle

seattle experienced some incredible weather this past week.  we had wind gusts beyond 70 miles per hour along with some pockets of torrential rain.  around midnight – 2am this past friday am, my wife and i stayed up to make sure everything was ok with the house and our children.  honestly, i was a little scared.  seeing trees outside sway back and forth was intense.  we woke up the next morning and from our perspective, everything seemed normal.  the streets were actually dry; we didn’t notice much debris on the grounds.  despite schools being closed, i proceeded to work like a normal day.  what was surprising was a steady flow of of phone calls from quest families asking if it was possible for them to stay with us since their power went out at their respective homes.

little did i know as a result of the wind storm, about a million people in the larger seattle area lost electricity!  as i post this blog, there are still over 250,000 folks that are still without electricity.  i guessed (from a show of hands at church today), about 40%+ of our church community had lost their electricity at one point in the past couple days.  had the church leaders known how many folks would have been affected by this windstorm, we would have been better prepared.  we should have had a list of homes ready to welcome guests as well as opening up the qcafe to local neighbors to use as a warm place to seek refuge and sleep if necessary.

in between hosting the quest christmas party on saturday night for about 70+ folks that showed up, our family has enjoyed being able to host several families who were left in the cold.   if you’re in need of some assistance or a warm place to crash until your power is restored, let us know.  our family and others within quest are able to serve you.  let’s use this opportunity to serve our neighbors, demonstrate kindness, and build the larger community of seattle.

be safe and stay warm.

Filed under: seattle

5 Responses - Comments are closed.

  1. SJ says:

    It is encouraging to see someone really living it… I have been trying to figure out the best term for it… I tend to call it “real life Christianity”, whatever you call it, it is the antithesis to nominal Christianity… You are living it… and you need to know that people are taking notice and be encouraged in that… what did St. Francis say, something about spreading the Gospel, and if you had to, use words…

  2. Sam says:

    Thanks for being such a wonderful pastor to our church.

  3. m@ says:

    SJ, I don’t believe St. Francis said that, but regardless it’s Franciscan in nature. And humbling.

    Eugene, I was actually thinking about this during church last night (in between spurts of wondering why you didn’t have your new giraffe on stage with you) — but I wondered how the two homeless gentlemen in the back of the audience at 5pm would have perceived our battle against the power lines. For them, braving the elements, not having refrigerated food or drink, or whatever luxuries we’re afforded simply by having electricity are never promised to them. Perhaps I should have just asked them, and that question would have been answered.

    Granted, we all have our own measure of struggles, and having to throw out my dairy products was no fun, but…yeah, it just got me thinking.

  4. e cho says:

    SJ: ‘really living it’ might be a stretch. ‘striving to pursue it’ might be more accurate. we also have 3000sq feet at our home; i was more encouraged by many folks that offered to share their couches, floors, food, and how showers than anything else.

    Matt: Bobby (one of our homeless friends) is a longtime friend. we’ve been encouraging and inviting him to work with us to get off the streets. it’s much more difficult that we can ever imagine. but indeed, this whole incident has put things into perspective when there’s still a substantial population around the world that either don’t have electricity or consistent electricity.

  5. this is SJ… wasn’t logged in before… not that it matters, but it is st. francis
    “Preach the gospel everyday; if necessary, use words.”
    St. Francis of Assisi
    looked it up online it must be true (snickers, but, i have heard it attributed to him often)…

    and “really living it” is not a stretch to me as much as a compliment… might be semantics here… i was encouraged to read the original blog…

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. Thanks for your prayers. 
I have numerous stories to share but for now, the following came up in every conversation with Iraqi/Syrian refugees:

1 Have tea with us. Or coffee. Or juice. Or something with lots of sugar in it. Or better yet, all of the above.
2 We want peace. We want security. 
3 We hate ISIS. 
4 We just want to go home.
5 Please don't forget us.

Please don't forget them... Father, please bless and protect these Iraqi and Syrian "refugee" children that have already endured so much. Protect their hearts and mind from unfathomable trauma. Plant seeds of hope and vision in their lives. And as we pray for them, teach us how to advocate for them. Amen. "We don't call them refugees. We call them relatives. We don't call them camps but centers. Dignity is so important." -  local Iraqi priest whose church has welcomed many "relatives" to their church's property

It's always a privilege to be invited into peoples' home for tea - even if it's a temporary tent. This is an extended Yezidi family that fled the Mosul, Iraq area because of ISIS. It's indeed true that Christians were targeted by ISIS and thatbstory muat be shared but other minority groups like the Yezidis were also targeted. Some of their heartbreaking stories included the kidnapping of their sister. They shared that their father passed away shortly of a "broken heart." The conversation was emotional but afterwards, we asked each other for permission to take photos. Once the selfies came out, the real smiles came out.

So friends: Pray for Iraq. Pray for the persecuted Church. Pray for Christians, minority groups like the Yezidis who fear they will e completely wiped out in the Middle East,, and Muslims alike who are all suffering under ISIS. Friends: I'm traveling in the Middle East this week - Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. (Make sure you follow my pics/stories on IG stories). Specifically, I'm here representing @onedayswages to meet, learn, and listen to pastors, local leaders, NGOs, and of course directly from refugees from within these countries - including many from Syria.

For security purposes, I haven't been able to share at all but I'm now able to start sharing some photos and stories. For now, I'll be sharing numerous photos through my IG stories and will be sharing some longer written pieces in couple months when ODW launches another wave of partnerships to come alongside refugees in these areas. Four of us are traveling together also for the purpose of creating a short documentary that we hope to release early next year.

While I'm on my church sabbatical, it's truly a privilege to be able to come to these countries and to meet local pastors and indigenous leaders that tirelessly pursue peace and justice, and to hear directly from refugees. I've read so many various articles and pieces over the years and I thought I was prepared but it has been jarring, heartbreaking,  and gut wrenching. In the midst of such chaos, there's hope but there's also a lot of questions, too.

I hope you follow along as I share photos, stories, and help release this mini-documentary. Please tag friends that might be interested.

Please pray for safety, for empathy, for humility and integrity, for divine meetings. Pray that we listen well; To be present and not just be a consumer of these vulnerable stories. That's my biggest prayer.

Special thanks to @worldvisionusa and @worldrelief for hosting us on this journey. 9/11
Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.

Today, I had some gut wrenching and heart breaking conversations about war, violence, and peacemaking. Mostly, I listened. Never in my wildest imagination did I envision having these conversations on 9/11 of all days. I wish I could share more now but I hope to later after I process them for a few days.

But indeed: Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.
May it be so. Amen. Mount Rainier is simply epic. There's nothing like flying in and out of Seattle.

#mountrainier
#seattle
#northwestisbest

my tweets

  • Boom. Final fishing trip. Grateful. A nice way to end my 3 month sabbatical. #catchandrelease twitter.com/i/web/status/9… || 1 day ago
  • Christians: May we be guided by the Scriptures that remind us, "Seek first the Kingdom of God" and not, "Seek first the kingdom of America." || 1 day ago
  • Every convo with Iraqi/Syrian refugees included: 1 Have tea with us 2 We want peace 3 We hate ISIS 4 We want to go home 5 Don't forget us || 4 days ago
  • Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan to assess @OneDaysWages' partnerships & to film mini-documentary on refugee crisis. So many emotions. || 4 days ago
  • Pray for Mexico. For those mourning loved ones. For those fighting for life - even under rubbles. For rescue workers. Lord, in your mercy. || 4 days ago
  • Don't underestimate what God can do through you. God has a very long history of using foolish and broken people for His purposes and glory. || 6 days ago