Eugene Cho

105 million dollars

our church’s leadership team and pastors have been intensely busy in the past month reviewing this past year’s budget and simultaneously putting together a budget proposal to our church membership.  it is true that one’s budget should be seen as a ‘moral document’ (jim wallis).  i’ve always believed that one of the most substantive ways to discern a person’s values, worldview, and depth was by asking to see their personal budget.  perhaps, it is for this reason that one of “the don’t do’s” in life or ministry is to be too inquisitive about folks’ personal finances.  two commitments my family and i have made to help us remain aligned with our stewardship values are 1) to share our 1040 tax report with at least one other person or family, and 2) to publicly share (or make available) our ‘charitable giving’ summary with our church membership.  the latter is something that the entire leadership team and pastors do together – not with the motivation to boast but to model an attempt to live generously and convey to our church community that we are not going to ask them to do something that we ourselves will not strive to do. 

i still recall the first six months of our church when we began meeting at the vineyard church in the seattle u-district.  they were very generous but coming up with the $200 monthly rent was honestly, difficult at times.  during that season, i was trying to feed my family working as a part-time custodian; seattle was experiencing the painful reality of the dot-com craze and implosion; folks were getting laid off left and right; quest was then not collecting regular offering; and we were lucky to have a dozen people join us for bible study.  as i look back, i’m humbled that God had chosen to use a handful of people to not only bring together a church community but what i believe to be a mini-movement within the larger movement of the Kingdom of God.  it’s taken us some time but it feels good to finally give our pastors and staff a decent raise, to provide medical benefits to our full-time employees, and to remain committed to appropriating about 25% of our income to churchplanting and global missions. 

while feeling pretty positive about our church’s budget and stewardship philosophy, i was stunned to come across news of a megachurch in florida that has recently broken a record for the most funds raised (pledged) in a capital campaign.  i have no idea what they were raising the funds for because i was simply stunned by the figure:  they raised in pledge the amount of 105 million dollars!

…Calvary Chapel in Ft. Lauderdale has received pledges totaling $105 million, believed to be the largest amount every raised by a US church…Chicago’s Willow Creek Church…raised more than $80 million in the 2000 Chapter 2 campaign… [full article]

here’s my commentary:  that’s a lot of money

Filed under: christianity, church, emerging church

5 Responses

  1. David Park says:

    Love your commitment to openness and putting your money where your mouth is. I hope it is something that many pastors and leaders would be encouraged to do in order to live authentic lives. Thanks for your example and your leadership.

  2. Blake says:

    Ditto to the previous post. 🙂 I deeply admire and find inspiration in your genuinity. (Is that even a word? Heh, I guess it is now. 😉 )

  3. e cho says:

    thanks. trying my best. but it’s amazing how selfish i can still be. i guess it’s a lifelong journey to learn how to be more giving and generous.

  4. Mark says:

    I don’t know if I like reading this or not. I must admit that hearing a church raise 105 mil makes me feel frustrated that we have struggled to come up with 150K. I like you have always transparent with my salary and giving trying to make the same statement “we wont ask you to do something we wont do” but I find that as people come into our community who have never been part of sucha thing as church /faith communities faithful giving is incredibly hard to grasp (especially when they are typically living at 120% of their income) . I have a friend who always tells me that if you aren’t struggling with sexual relationships, heresy, and finances in a congregation then your dealing with the wrong people. – your milage may vary 🙂

  5. m@ says:

    I agree, Mark — and even more ironic to your last sentence is that many people keep financial struggles closest to their chest. I think I’ve been in many a situation where a pastor would give a story about how someone would tithe and, as a result, some sort of monetary blessing would come about, saving him/her from financial ruin. A great story, but it sorta distorts the purpose of giving “with good cheer”, doesn’t it? For someone who doesn’t entirely understand the concept of tithing, he/she may respond to that by saying “why should I tithe? I’m not in dire straits!”

    That said, if we really do adhere to the belief that God will not give us more than we can handle, then whatever needs your church has/will have will be met in full, even if the bottom line doesn’t reflect that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Window seat. For the win. As leaders, we must not see ministry and family as competing commitments.  We must not sacrifice our marriage and kids for the sake of "ministry." How can we? Loving our families IS ministry & good leadership.

And on a side note, we took this goofy photo for Mother's Day last Sunday at @seattlequest. I was shocked! What in the world happened to our kids? Our 13 year old son blocked four of my shots on the basketball court yesterday. He's since been grounded... I fear that we ask God to move mountains, forgetting that God also wants to move us.

In fact, it's possible that we are that mountain. Time flies. The eldest is wrapping up her 1st year in college and the college tours have begun for the 2nd child. The youngest enters high school in the Fall. Can't say enough about how proud Minhee and I are of the kids - not just of their accomplishments but the people they are and are becoming.

But...man...we can't wait to party it up when we're emptynesters. Party at our house. It's going to be epic. Humbled. Grateful. Mindful of God's grace and faithfulness in my life. It's all grace... It's an unexpected honor to be invited back - even with some mini-drama - to @princetonseminary to receive the 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award - exactly 25 years after starting my journey there as a student in 1992. Wow.

Princeton isn't necessarily for everyone. And to say that I loved everything about my experience would be misleading but it was very formative. Ir challenged me to examine why I believed in what I believed. It reminded me that God could handle my questions. It prepared me for a post-Christian context where I am not entitled to be heard but I had to earn the right to be heard, and of course, it taught me that all is good with a Philly cheese steak at Hoagie Haven.

No one is an island to themselves and I am certainly an example of that. Many people - women and men, young and old, and of many backgrounds - prayed, encouraged, mentored, and loved me along the way. Grateful for my professors at seminary, my many classmates, and the numerous fellow staff and co-laborers I've had the privilege of serving Christ with past and present. And of course, I'm forever inspired by my parents, my children, and my wife, Minhee. Thank you for your faith, hope, and love...and oh, for your patience. Only your family will know and see both the best and worst of you. They've seen my worst...and keep on believing in me.

Thank you again, PTS and President Barnes, for this honor. Then, today, and tomorrow...by God's grace, just striving to be faithful to my Lord and Savior...to preach and live out the convictions of the whole Gospel. Amen. So humbled and grateful to be with @catalystleader in Cincinnati to encourage leaders from all around the country about the invitation to Uncommon Fellowship.

Preached from John 4. We can talk, preach, sing, philsophize, liturgize, and spit rhymes about Samaria...but we still have to talk through Samaria.

my tweets

  • "They got money for wars but can't feed the poor." ~ Tupac #trumpbudget || 18 hours ago
  • Heartbroken. Praying for Manchester & the UK. For those mourning loved ones. For those injured and fighting for life. Lord, in your mercy. || 2 days ago
  • Window seat. For the win. https://t.co/yG66Sm2bvu || 4 days ago
  • As leaders, we must not sacrifice our family for the sake of ministry because loving our family IS good leadership: instagram.com/p/BUVAGVwg-5z/ || 4 days ago
  • We long for a Gospel that comforts but resist the Gospel that disrupts. Having the former without the latter seduces us into complacency. || 4 days ago
  • Love wins in the end but in the meanwhile,it fights for things that matter. Love isn't sentimental. It's both gentle & fierce. Love endures. || 5 days ago