Eugene Cho

monday sermon quarterback | ex 34

i don’t intend to make this a weekly habit.  not planning on sharing post sermon thoughts every week but will do so when i say something or omit something that i want to elaborate on.

yesterday, continued teaching on exodus 34 and the juxtaposition of god’s compassion and the announcement of punishment for sins for parents and their children to the third and fourth generation.  i wanted to elaborate on my thoughts that i shared about the importance of shaping ‘worldview’ of our children and how the early years are so important.

as a father of three, i know that parenting is complex.  i didn’t want parent and parents to be at quest (we’ve had about 10 babies born in the past 5-6 months) to feel like i was trivializing the tension they must feel as they make decisions about their families.  nor did i want to offend the feminists of quest (i refer to them as such with respect).

my proposal:  supporting and raising families are getting tougher.  dual incomes no longer seem to be an option but a way of life and that simply perturbs the life out of me.  in the early years of a child(ren)’s life, i believe parents ought to seriously consider one PARENT staying home to raise the child rather than daycares, babysitters, or even extended families. EDIT:  I’m not downplaying the health and viability of integrating other options but the importance of parents playing the PRIMARY role and not secondary roles to some of the options I listed earlier.  finances and income is obviously a legitimate concern but while we so easily justify taking on debt to obtain degrees and training – college, grad, seminary, etc. – i just think that parents shouldn’t feel so bad about debt in order to make the investment of the early year(s) of their children.  this is the choice that my wife and i have made.  we’re not espousing reckless  accrument of debt, but wise and prayerful investments.  there is nothing more significant that raising, nurturing, and shaping the lives of our children – so that they shape the lives of their children and add to the global community for the honor of God’s glory.

again, this is not to elevate the guilt level of parents who have chosen to continue working.  not at all. please pray, think, wrestle, and ultimately, may you FOLLOW your convictions and simultaneously, not be consumed entirely by your circumstances.

for those from our quest church community, we’ll have some of the se asia vision team sharing their stories this upcoming sunday and i’ll finally wrap up exodus on september 24.  we’ll take a break before we get into delicious leviticus.

Filed under: church, quest church

3 Responses

  1. David Park says:

    You raise some good points. I think that a response that I would like to see from churches and believers is a real, tangible commitment to community, living in community and raising our children in community. I believe that no other faith has a stronger theology or calling for that type of sacrificial communal living than what Christ gives us, and yet it is hard to see examples of that in real terms. So in terms of sacrificing and willingness to go into debt for the raising of our children, it should be a collective, communal commitment of like-Christ-minded people which should reduce debt altogether and allow us to visibly live with the statement that is counter to this individualistic, egocentric, here-and-now culture that we live in.

    Of course, I don’t have children yet, but ask me in a couple of years, I’m working on it though right now.

  2. Anonymous says:

    Eugene,

    I really appreciated your thoughts on Sunday morning.

    But I’m just not so sure that having a self-sufficient family unit where one brings in income, and one watches the children, is even always desirable. In earlier times, and in other cultures, the extended family was there to help. In the absence of extended family, most of us have to turn to friends and paid care-givers. The way that American families tend to do this is with mom and the kids staying home all alone all day. They may get out from time to time, but the mom generally has no other adult interaction during most days. I’m just not sure this model of isolated family was ever how it was intended to be. Kids need strong bonds with their parents, but having others around to help (extended family, friends, paid care givers) doesn’t interfere with that process and it can teach more about community beyond the stand-alone small family unit. The family unit is part of a bigger whole, and wasn’t ever intended to operate in isolation. I think some of the cracks that have appeared in the foundation of family are due to putting a bigger burden on it than it was meant to stand up under.

  3. eugenecho says:

    anonymous

    i agree. i recant the part about ‘extended families’ needing to be involved. i also agree that other forms of ‘community’ ought to be involved. there are many varaibles but here’s one variable that MUST not change: parents must be involved. and in ways that we’re not willing to acknowledge, i see parents (not necessarily at quest but just in general) too easily taking a backseat in the role of raising our children.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

One Day’s Wages

My Instagram

Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. Thanks for your prayers. 
I have numerous stories to share but for now, the following came up in every conversation with Iraqi/Syrian refugees:

1 Have tea with us. Or coffee. Or juice. Or something with lots of sugar in it. Or better yet, all of the above.
2 We want peace. We want security. 
3 We hate ISIS. 
4 We just want to go home.
5 Please don't forget us.

Please don't forget them... Father, please bless and protect these Iraqi and Syrian "refugee" children that have already endured so much. Protect their hearts and mind from unfathomable trauma. Plant seeds of hope and vision in their lives. And as we pray for them, teach us how to advocate for them. Amen. "We don't call them refugees. We call them relatives. We don't call them camps but centers. Dignity is so important." -  local Iraqi priest whose church has welcomed many "relatives" to their church's property

It's always a privilege to be invited into peoples' home for tea - even if it's a temporary tent. This is an extended Yezidi family that fled the Mosul, Iraq area because of ISIS. It's indeed true that Christians were targeted by ISIS and thatbstory muat be shared but other minority groups like the Yezidis were also targeted. Some of their heartbreaking stories included the kidnapping of their sister. They shared that their father passed away shortly of a "broken heart." The conversation was emotional but afterwards, we asked each other for permission to take photos. Once the selfies came out, the real smiles came out.

So friends: Pray for Iraq. Pray for the persecuted Church. Pray for Christians, minority groups like the Yezidis who fear they will e completely wiped out in the Middle East,, and Muslims alike who are all suffering under ISIS. Friends: I'm traveling in the Middle East this week - Iraq, Lebanon, and Jordan. (Make sure you follow my pics/stories on IG stories). Specifically, I'm here representing @onedayswages to meet, learn, and listen to pastors, local leaders, NGOs, and of course directly from refugees from within these countries - including many from Syria.

For security purposes, I haven't been able to share at all but I'm now able to start sharing some photos and stories. For now, I'll be sharing numerous photos through my IG stories and will be sharing some longer written pieces in couple months when ODW launches another wave of partnerships to come alongside refugees in these areas. Four of us are traveling together also for the purpose of creating a short documentary that we hope to release early next year.

While I'm on my church sabbatical, it's truly a privilege to be able to come to these countries and to meet local pastors and indigenous leaders that tirelessly pursue peace and justice, and to hear directly from refugees. I've read so many various articles and pieces over the years and I thought I was prepared but it has been jarring, heartbreaking,  and gut wrenching. In the midst of such chaos, there's hope but there's also a lot of questions, too.

I hope you follow along as I share photos, stories, and help release this mini-documentary. Please tag friends that might be interested.

Please pray for safety, for empathy, for humility and integrity, for divine meetings. Pray that we listen well; To be present and not just be a consumer of these vulnerable stories. That's my biggest prayer.

Special thanks to @worldvisionusa and @worldrelief for hosting us on this journey. 9/11
Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.

Today, I had some gut wrenching and heart breaking conversations about war, violence, and peacemaking. Mostly, I listened. Never in my wildest imagination did I envision having these conversations on 9/11 of all days. I wish I could share more now but I hope to later after I process them for a few days.

But indeed: Never forget.
And never stop working for peace.
May it be so. Amen. Mount Rainier is simply epic. There's nothing like flying in and out of Seattle.

#mountrainier
#seattle
#northwestisbest

my tweets

  • Every convo with Iraqi/Syrian refugees included: 1 Have tea with us 2 We want peace 3 We hate ISIS 4 We want to go home 5 Don't forget us || 2 days ago
  • Back safely from Iraq, Lebanon, Jordan to assess @OneDaysWages' partnerships & to film mini-documentary on refugee crisis. So many emotions. || 2 days ago
  • Pray for Mexico. For those mourning loved ones. For those fighting for life - even under rubbles. For rescue workers. Lord, in your mercy. || 2 days ago
  • Don't underestimate what God can do through you. God has a very long history of using foolish and broken people for His purposes and glory. || 5 days ago
  • Father, bless these Iraqi and Syrian refugee children that have already endured so much. As we pray, teach us how t… twitter.com/i/web/status/9… || 6 days ago
  • Pray for Iraq. Pray for persecuted Church, minority groups (Yezidis) and Muslims alike who are suffering under ISIS: instagram.com/p/BZF2j6Ngrna/ || 6 days ago