Eugene Cho

an update on our global poverty initiative

from flickr

I hope that while this entry topic might not be as alluring as your top search engine topics like Britney Spears and Barack Obama, you’ll take a few minutes to read up the progress of our global poverty organization.  This has been one of the most humbling seasons of our life.  When we went public with our vision to give our year’s salary to start this poverty initiative, we had absolutely no idea about what was in store with the financial crisis and meltdown.  Our convictions have been tested but each time we think about how “bad” we have it, we’re reminded of the grave situation for the poorest of the poor – those affected by “extreme global poverty.”

Here’s 5 Updates on our Progress:

  • FACEBOOK.  On Friday, December 5, our Facebook Group – which can be accessed at – surpassed 200,000 members.  It’s pretty amazing considering we started the group on May 15, 2008.  While there are no guarantees if folks will ultimately support our organization, it confirms our aspiration for our initiative in helping change the world:

Human Relationships + Technology + [Vision] = Movement Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: seattle, technology, , , , , ,

if [my daughter] had $100,000…

As Minhee and I work towards launching a humanitarian organization later this year [once the 501c3 is officially issued], we’ve been enjoying opportunities to speak to our children about why we’ve made the decision and how it will impact our family.  We share with our kids about our faith in Christ and our desire to be agents of mercy, justice, and humility – both locally and globally.   But in many ways, our children are the ones that often challenge us with their sense of compassion.

[During my current sabbatical, I’ll be reposting some old posts for your reading pleasure.]

My oldest daughter who’s in 4th grade had a homework assignment this week where she was asked to write an essay about how she would help others if she had $100,000.  What a coincidence since that’s the amount we’ve pledged.  Anyways, I read it on Sunday night and was floored.

Read her essay below and check out the “vision plan” that she drew out.  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, religion, ,

fight poverty 3 – a vision of compassion and redistribution

This is the third and final part of a short series entitled, Fight Poverty.  If interested, you can read Part I [An Introduction] and Part II [A Broken World].  We want to do our part so Minhee and I have decided to give up our annual salary next year to join the fight against global poverty.

Global poverty is a very painful and complex situation.  But, it can also be seen in a simple angle:

  1. There are people and countries around the world that are suffering, dying, and in grave need.
  2. There are people and countries with abundant resources that can benefit the “have nots” around the world.
  3. The solution is simple:  Redistribute resources from us to them [since we are part of the same global community] and in that process, help create sustainability and build up/equip local leaders…

I know it’s too simplistic but we must see ourselves as part of the solution.  There is nothing wrong with enjoying the material goods that most of us have access to but we can easily cross the line into gluttony and overconsumption.  My family and I have everything that we can possibly need but there are times I still struggle with wanting more.  When is enough enough? Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, health, religion, ,

stuff, connect, info

one day’s wages | video

My Instagram

The Western Wall in Old City of Jerusalem (aka The Wailing Wall) - from the Second Jewish Temple.

I'm hoping to share a few stories of people that I met (Jewish, Muslims, and Christians) in the Holy Land in the days to come. One of our Palestinian tour guides said to me, "You will leave with more questions...and that's a good thing." He was absolutely right. We want everything so nicely packaged but if we're honest, it's very rare in a broken, complex world...and I can't think of too many things more complex than the situation in Israel and Palestine.

While I certainly understand and resonate with Israel and its history and its need to protect itself from harm, one can't deny the history and existence of Palestine as well. 
Is peace possible? This was the focus of my trip to the Holy learn more about the conflict and those that are working towards peace. My friend, Scott (and other pastor), Mae (our guide) and I had the privilege of going to a Jewish synagogue this past Friday. We were then hosted by a local rabbi and his family for a Shabbat meal. It was marvelous. Incredible. Illuminating. Delicious. A true honor to be invited to his home with his wife and three children. To pray, learn, share, and ask questions. 
What I loved the most was the story of how Rabbi Daniel and his wife rented a bus to take 15 of their friends to the West Bank ... to see for themselves the impact of the wall and the Israeli policies. Some of their friends had never even entered the West Bank...don't personally know a Palestinian. It's impossible to work towards peace when we don't know anyone from the other side...when we don't understand the other side.

Thank you, Rabbi Daniel. Old Jerusalem. So many stories. So much history. The synagogue in Capernaum (Galilee) where Jesus began his public ministry. He taught with authority... Pray for your pastors and teachers...that they may teach with courage, conviction, humility, and ultimately, directing people to Christ - the Word made flesh.

Speaking of, so excited to be teaching at @Quest Church tomorrow. If you're in the Seattle area, join us. A glimpse of Jordan River where John baptized Jesus. "This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased." What amazes me most about this event is about...timing and patience. For Christ, it wasn't about "if" but about "when." In a world of supersonic pace,  impatience, quick results, hurry and now and NOW...Jesus waited for the Father's timing. He was patient and faithful. I need to learn that waiting on the Lord in itself isn't apathy but rather an act of faith. The town of Bethlehem and at the site of the cave (aka manger) of the birth of Christ.

One of the highlights was a class of Palestinian Muslims and Christian kids in a local public school singing a Christmas carol for us in Bethlehem...just across the Shepherd's Field. Galilee. Surreal to be at the mountainside where Jesus delivered "The Sermon on the Mount" ... aka The Beatitudes. Walking around praying for Paris, Beirut, Istanbul, Nigeria, Mali, Palestine/Israel... This verse is so particularly important in light of all the violence in the world. "Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God." - Matthew 5:9

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