Eugene Cho

falling in love with nebraska

As I shared earlier, I spent about 8 days in the middle of nowhere recently to cap my sabbatical.  Where did I go?  Because of some connections with friends, I retreated in a small town you’ve never heard of in Central Nebraska.  Yes, you read that correctly…Nebraska.  And after my visit, I think I fell in love with Nebraska [check out the pics below].

The population of the town was 302 people according to some townspeople.  According to their census, Asians comprise .24% of town’s 302 people.  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, travel

arrived and learning in haiti

The title of this post was supposed to be the title of a post that I was going to publish yesterday.  I was scheduled to fly out to Haiti on Monday to spend some time with connections, shadow and learn from some organizations for research for our poverty organization, hang with kids at orphanages, and learn about how the food crisis has significantly impacted the people of Haiti.  But because of the multiple storms that have hit Haiti and the surrounding countries – including the current “Ike” storm – I had to make a gut and prayerful decision to postpone my trip to another time. 

I have yet to step foot in Haiti but I have heard so much about its beauty and depravity.  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: religion, travel,

our family trip to korea

Our family trekked back to the Korea for a six week excursion for various purposes but especially because Korea is our “heart home.”  We had a great time even despite the intense humidity.  Great memories that we hope our children will remember throughout their lives.  Here are some pictures and a video to give you a glimpse of where our shoes took us in Korea. 

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, travel

solitude for the soul in seoul

We’re spending our last few days in Korea now.  If you don’t know much about Seoul, it is the capital of South Korea and one of the largest cities in the world.  It ranks from anywhere between 1 to 10 – depending on how people define the words: city, large, density, etc.  The city itself has about 10.5 million residents and the larger Seoul area has about 24 million people – plus or minus a few thousand.

In short, it is crowded but an amazing story nevertheless.  About 50 years ago, Seoul as we know it did not exist as it was toppled by the devastation of the Korean War.  However, it now stands as one of the emerging premier global cities.  It has hosted the summer Olympics [1988] and co-hosted the FIFA World Cup [2002].  And yet, with it’s fast paced growth has come its share of growing pains. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, travel

where is home?

Where is home for you?  Where is your heart home?  Let me explain.

After leaving Korea at age six and immigrating to the United States, I’ve often wrestled with the idea of “home.”

Growing up in San Francisco, I was often ridiculed and found myself in my share of fights – and usually on the losing end.  One comment I often heard was:

“Why don’t you go back home, Chink.  Go back where you came from.” Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, travel

land of the morning calm

Several folks have asked us why we have chosen to go to South Korea – also known as the Land of the Morning Calm – for our sabbatical. 

One of the reasons why we have decided to spend two months in South Korea is because Korea boasts some of the world’s most incredible beaches:  beautiful, intimate and not overcrowded, free of consumerism, and exclusive and private.  Check out these amazing pictures and don’t be envious. Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, travel

low tide adventure pictures

Wow!  After some morning drizzle, it turned out to be a beautiful day here in Seattle and the low tides during midday did not disappoint.  So glad that Minhee and I took the kids out of school for couple hours to explore Golden Gardens Beach.  Our kids knew what most of these sealife were or at least, they had better guesses than I did. 

While the forecast calls for rain throughout the week, you can still enjoy the low tide throughout the entire week.  Check out these pictures.  I’m borrowing a Canon G9 from one of the best photographers I know. Best point and shoot that I’ve personally used.  The last photo was taken by MacHero.

* No animals were hurt in this photoshoot.

Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, travel,

low tide in seattle = adventure

Update:  Check out the pics from our adventure.

I’m really excited.  So excited that I’ll sneak my kids out of school for couple hours tomorrow [Wednesday, June 4] to head off to a local beach called Golden Gardens to enjoy the adventures of what experts are speculating to be the lowest tide in Seattle in about 20 years.

Years ago, I would have been strongly against the idea of our kids missing any school.  Nowadays, I’m always looking and wanting for the kids to take a day or two off school so that my wife and I can spend some extra time with them.  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: family, travel,

at the end of the world

I am so envious. Even as I write this entry, this couple is traveling to the ends of the earth.  But tomorrow, I get to go to…Tacoma, Washington.  Holla.

In light of yesterday’s intense post and conversation, here’s a simple question and hopefully, many folks, including the “quiet” blog readers will chime in:  Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: travel

freezing chicago

I’m currently in Chicago for a quick visit to the Covenant Midwinter Conference  and to re-connect with some pastor colleagues around North America and will be returning to Seattle later today.  It snowed yesterday [again] in Seattle and I know folks have been complaining about the cold.  Well, toughen up…it’s nothing compared to how others have it…

This is the the forecast for Chicago today [Tuesday]:



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And let’s not even talk about eastern Canada where the temp [w/ wind chill factor] will be between 26-38 degrees celsius!  Honestly, I know that Chicago is a wonderful city but Read the rest of this entry »

Filed under: travel

stuff, connect, info

one day’s wages | video

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The Western Wall in Old City of Jerusalem (aka The Wailing Wall) - from the Second Jewish Temple.

I'm hoping to share a few stories of people that I met (Jewish, Muslims, and Christians) in the Holy Land in the days to come. One of our Palestinian tour guides said to me, "You will leave with more questions...and that's a good thing." He was absolutely right. We want everything so nicely packaged but if we're honest, it's very rare in a broken, complex world...and I can't think of too many things more complex than the situation in Israel and Palestine.

While I certainly understand and resonate with Israel and its history and its need to protect itself from harm, one can't deny the history and existence of Palestine as well. 
Is peace possible? This was the focus of my trip to the Holy learn more about the conflict and those that are working towards peace. My friend, Scott (and other pastor), Mae (our guide) and I had the privilege of going to a Jewish synagogue this past Friday. We were then hosted by a local rabbi and his family for a Shabbat meal. It was marvelous. Incredible. Illuminating. Delicious. A true honor to be invited to his home with his wife and three children. To pray, learn, share, and ask questions. 
What I loved the most was the story of how Rabbi Daniel and his wife rented a bus to take 15 of their friends to the West Bank ... to see for themselves the impact of the wall and the Israeli policies. Some of their friends had never even entered the West Bank...don't personally know a Palestinian. It's impossible to work towards peace when we don't know anyone from the other side...when we don't understand the other side.

Thank you, Rabbi Daniel. Old Jerusalem. So many stories. So much history. The synagogue in Capernaum (Galilee) where Jesus began his public ministry. He taught with authority... Pray for your pastors and teachers...that they may teach with courage, conviction, humility, and ultimately, directing people to Christ - the Word made flesh.

Speaking of, so excited to be teaching at @Quest Church tomorrow. If you're in the Seattle area, join us. A glimpse of Jordan River where John baptized Jesus. "This is my Son, whom I love; with him I am well pleased." What amazes me most about this event is about...timing and patience. For Christ, it wasn't about "if" but about "when." In a world of supersonic pace,  impatience, quick results, hurry and now and NOW...Jesus waited for the Father's timing. He was patient and faithful. I need to learn that waiting on the Lord in itself isn't apathy but rather an act of faith. The town of Bethlehem and at the site of the cave (aka manger) of the birth of Christ.

One of the highlights was a class of Palestinian Muslims and Christian kids in a local public school singing a Christmas carol for us in Bethlehem...just across the Shepherd's Field. Galilee. Surreal to be at the mountainside where Jesus delivered "The Sermon on the Mount" ... aka The Beatitudes. Walking around praying for Paris, Beirut, Istanbul, Nigeria, Mali, Palestine/Israel... This verse is so particularly important in light of all the violence in the world. "Blessed are the peacemakers for they shall be called the children of God." - Matthew 5:9

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