Eugene Cho

what really happened with laura ling, euna lee, and north korea?

North Korea border

These are crazy times but I have a feeling that those words could have been said at every point in human history.  These are crazy times because, in my opinion, it reflects that reality that “something just isn’t right with the world.” But nevertheless, we keep working and moving forward towards restoration and reconciliation. I just hope folks comes to realize that God is the author of Shalom and thus, we need to return to Him for guidance in this journey.

I’ve been mulling the situation in numerous part of the world but also keeping tabs with American journalists Laura Ling and Euna Lee.  I have friends, even as I write this, that cross the border of North Korea and China on a weekly if not daily basis.  When the whole news broke, I was absolutely confused:

How do journalists accidentally cross over to North Korea?

You don’t.

My suspicion all along has been foul play – somehow, somewhere, and some folks.

The 12 year sentence?

Didn’t really surprise me – but it still saddened me.

So what will happen?

For now, it’s all a guessing game but one thing I am convinced of is that the blame does NOT fall on Laura and Euna.  We need to keep them in our thoughts & prayers; Continue to put pressure on our government and its officials to maintain dialgoue and pressure on North Korea. I am also convinced that they will return one day. And while it was not what they intended or planned, the words they will write and share will be more impactful than they can imagine. It will give the world a deeper glimpse of the darkness in North Korea and the change/revolution that needs to happen.  For now, I want to encourage you to check out Nicholas Kristof’s article (below) about Laura Ling, Euna Lee, and North Korea. I agree with much of his assessment.

My ancestors are from North Korea.  My father and mother was born in North Korea. Some of you have read my burden and heart for North Korea.  Couple years ago, my parents trekked back to this part of the China and North Korea border in hopes of seeing their homeland – even from across the border.  He was taking some pictures and captured the one above before he was “asked” to stop taking pictures.

Here’s the full article by Kristof. Read it:

Now that my colleague David Rohde has escaped from his Taliban kidnappers, the American journalists who remain imprisoned for their work are Laura Ling and Euna Lee. They are the two journalists for Current TV who were arrested on March 17 for crossing illegally from China into North Korea at the Tumen River.

The details of the arrests remain unclear; they have “confessed,” but that is meaningless — who wouldn’t in such circumstances? There have been some suggestions that they wandered accidentally across the border, but that’s not easy to do. I’ve reported three times in that same area along the Tumen, interviewing North Koreans on the Chinese side of the border, and it’s always clear where the border is. That said, people often do cross over deliberately, just inside the border, and there are usually no consequences at all. In 1997, a Times correspondent based in China, Seth Faison, stepped across stones in the Yalu River (a different part of the border with China) to reach a North Korean island. He wrote:

”Have any cigarettes?” asked the head of North Korea’s five-man border guard on Lee Island, a finger of land in the Yalu River dividing North Korea from China. The officer, who gave his name as Park, lay idly on a shady patch of sand a few dozen yards from the border. He did not get up to greet a pair of visitors who stepped on stones to cross a narrow bend in the river from China, and allowed them onto the island because they accompanied a Chinese trader who had given him a pack of Chinese cigarettes the day before, worth 12 cents.
Another possibility, which I incline to, is that Laura and Euna may have been sold to North Korea by a local guide. If the guide said that it was safe to cross, or that they were still on Chinese territory, they would have believed him. Moreover, by some accounts they were working on a story about human trafficking — there’s a good deal of trafficking of North Korean women and girls into China, into prostitution and to be wives of peasants — and the traffickers could well have tricked them in exchange for a reward from North Korea. A couple of years ago, I set up an interview with a trafficker in that border area, but then backed out when he demanded money; the traffickers may realize that the people to demand money from aren’t the journalists but the North Korean officials. And at a time of crisis, when it is undergoing a leadership transition and a confrontation with the West, North Korea would probably pay well for a few extra bargaining chips in the form of American journalists.

Laura and Euna were sentenced to 12 years in a labor camp. The conditions in those camps are unbelievably wretched, according to survivors and guards who have escaped (the book “Aquariums of Pyongyang” offers an window into them). But since Laura and Euna will eventually be released, the authorities will treat them more gingerly; perhaps they will be kept in a guest house. North Korea would lose face if they died or turned out to be starving, and that will help them immeasurably. In both my visits inside North Korea, the government has worked so hard to keep foreigners from seeing the real North Korea that I just can’t believe that it would allow Euna and Laura to see anything real even in the context of their punishment.

My hunch is that North Korea will use them for a time as a propaganda victory and then release them to a high-ranking visitor — Al Gore, Bill Richardson or someone else. Gore invested in Current TV, and Richardson has gone to North Korea before to extricate Americans and has a decent relationship with officials there. The problem is that a North Korean freighter is now steaming on the high seas, apparently to Burma, and reputedly carrying weapons. The U.S. should stop it and search it or turn it back, since Burma obviously won’t, but that could easily lead to bullets flying — either at sea or in an incident at the DMZ, or both. If there is such an incident, North Korea may be less likely to release Laura and Euna for the time being.

Then there’s the transition. In the past, North Korean provocations have mostly been about us — they’ve been intended to get our attention, in hopes of working out some kind of a deal. But this time, the provocations may be more about internal North Korean power dynamics, meant to facilitate the rise of Kim Jong Un, Kim Jong Il’s youngest son, as the chosen heir. If this is all related to internal politics, then there’s not much we can do. Ambassador Steve Bosworth, the administration’s envoy for North Korea, reportedly has been blocked by North Korea from visiting; that’s a bad sign that this is all about them, not us.

Incidentally, for those who want to learn more about how North Korea ticks, there have been many good books lately. Perhaps the best is Bradley Martin’s exhaustive “Under the Loving Care of the Fatherly Leader.” And the Inspector O novels, set in Pyongyang and written by an American intelligence expert on North Korea (who uses the pseudonym James Church), beautifully capture the attitudes of the North Korean officials I’ve met.

And for Laura and Euna, if by some chance this blog post reaches you, courage! We are with you in spirit, and some day this will end. Then you’ll back with your loved ones, celebrating, like David Rohde. You will come home!

Filed under: , , , , ,

8 Responses

  1. Sue says:

    Eugene,
    Thanks for sharing this and Nic’s article. I agree that they will return but we have to put the pressure on to have it be sooner than later.

  2. charlestlee says:

    Thanks for sharing Eugene. There’s no doubt that something unusual happened with Ling-Lee. I too have friends who have worked in that area and I highly doubt that they just happened to be on the other side.

    In any case, I hope for a quick return home for those two journalists. Regardless of fault, it’s too bad that they are being used as pawns.

  3. Thanks for posting on this and helping us stay informed.

    And I know this is sort of a strange reaction, but as I watch the news surrounding this, my biggest question involves the parenting angle. Where does the line get drawn when it comes to courting danger and being responsible to one’s family? From what I’ve heard, the 4 year old is still being told that “mommy’s at work.” I know that the question is way bigger than this incident, but it brought it to mind…

  4. bl78 says:

    I havent seen it but heard on CNN or FOX that one of the people that were with Laura and Euna had a video camera which captured a footage of them crossing the border.

  5. Bo says:

    I hope Kristof is right. Certainly they ought to be freed immediately and it is unfortunate they are being used as political pawns. As to what happened – I’m not making any judgments yet. Laura Ling’s sister, Lisa Ling, did cross over into N. Korea in June 2006 with hidden cameras and filmed a show for National Geographic. I’m wondering if someone tipped off the N Koreans and they grabbed them whether in N. Korea or China in retaliation.

  6. Samantha says:

    How sad? Iran and kidnapped journalists…

    So few comments as all our attention goes to Jon & Kate (Plus Hate).

  7. Thanks for reporting on this very important issue, and adding to my understanding of it. It completely makes sense that NK would want to postulate in light of a new leader. Ling and Lee were shedding light on a shameful situation. Let’s all pray for and work towards their release.

  8. jeanne wall says:

    these people are innocent and should be sent home to their families. the u s is not doing their job .do you know if it was any of the bosses family they would have been home already. it is a shame that our country cares nothing about our people. they are thinking about nobody but themselves. i am ashamed to say i live in the u.s. God help you stupid goverment aides. may God hurt you for this. jeanne wall

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

stuff, connect, info

My Instagram

I'm no fan of prosperity theology, prayer of jabez, or the anointed lure...unless it involves fishing. Then, I'm all about it. 
Bless me, Jesus! #DoublePortion Gone fishing. First monster bass.

Going offline to train for the World Bass Championships. See you all next week. Grateful. Enjoying a moment with my earthly father and my Heavenly Father. Road trip continued.
Mountains are awesome. Road trip. Epic clouds. Oceans. 
#pugetsound

my tweets

  • Dear leaders: Leadership can be difficult...especially if we don't know how to genuinely apologize. Please learn how to say, "I'm sorry." || 1 hour ago
  • The best way to become a better storyteller is to simply live a more honest, deeper, and faithful life. Your move. || 18 hours ago
  • I'm no fan of prosperity theology, prayer of jabez, or the anointed lure...unless it's abt fishing. Bless me, Jesus! http://t.co/HALQeyolQO || 1 day ago
  • Gone fishing. First monster bass. Going offline to train for the World Bass Championships. See you all next week. http://t.co/hDVpifXryy || 6 days ago
  • We live in a busy world but there's a difference between empty fatigue and gratifying tiredness. Invest in the things you deeply care about. || 6 days ago
  • Grateful. Enjoying a moment with my earthly father and my Heavenly Father. instagram.com/p/qzu0efyWdN/ http://t.co/FHBIAh8Hrq || 1 week ago
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 933 other followers